Extended Audio Sample

Download In the Country of Men: A Novel Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample In the Country of Men: A Novel Audiobook, by Hisham Matar Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,819 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Hisham Matar Narrator: Stephen Hoye Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: April 2007 ISBN: 9781400174188
Regular Price: $16.99 Add to Cart
— or —
FlexPass™ Price: $12.95$5.95$5.95 for new members!
Add to Cart learn more )

Libya, 1979: nine-year-old Suleiman’s days are circumscribed by the narrow rituals of childhood: outings to the ruins surrounding Tripoli, games with friends played under the burning sun, exotic gifts from his father’s constant business trips abroad. But his nights have come to revolve around his mother’s increasingly disturbing bedside stories full of old family bitterness. And then one day Suleiman sees his father across the square of a busy marketplace, his face wrapped in a pair of dark sunglasses. Wasn’t he supposed to be away on business yet again? Why is he going into that strange building with the green shutters? Why did he lie?

Suleiman is soon caught up in a world he cannot hope to understand—where the sound of the telephone ringing becomes a portent of grave danger; where his mother frantically burns his father’s cherished books; where a stranger full of sinister questions sits outside in a parked car all day; where his best friend’s father can disappear overnight, next to be seen publicly interrogated on state television.

In the Country of Men is a stunning depiction of a child confronted with the private fallout of a public nightmare. But above all, it is a debut of rare insight and literary grace.

Download and start listening now!

bdm1

Quotes & Awards

  • “Matar writes in a voice that shifts gracefully between the adult exile looking back and the young boy experiencing these events through his limited, confused point of view.”

    Washington Post

  • “A tender-hearted account, winning in its simplicity, of a childhood infected too soon by the darkness of adults.”

    Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

  • “With so much horror to digest, Hoye wisely doesn’t try to infuse childish ingenuousness into Suleiman’s observations. An exceptional debut novel is given an intelligent, respectful reading.”

    AudioFile

  • New York Times Bestseller
  • Washington Post Bestseller
  • National Book Critics Circle Award Nominee

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shui | 2/13/2014

    " Beautiful prose. Left me feeling humble and deeply grateful for the life I have in the West. Gives a glimpse how ordinary people behave in a hostile environment in order to get by and not be noticed. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Isabella Douglas | 2/6/2014

    " Love the opening and seeing the story through the eyes of a young boy. The language brings the reader into the story immediately. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rashid | 2/6/2014

    " Talks about an early period in Qaddafi's rule of Libya from a child's point of view. Well written but left with no ending! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nicole Marble | 1/27/2014

    " Written in 2008 about Libya in 1979, it seeps prescient: a police state, revolutionary students, secret police, arbritary arrests, told through the eyes of a 9 year old boy. It is a strange story, strangely told. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dovofthegalilee | 1/20/2014

    " I usually find Arabic authors to be repetitive in their themes and so I read them less and less. In this case while some of those themes are present [deflowering of a young teen bride] there is a freshness present here. I like how he views Muhmar Quadafi's regime and the horror that he caused through the eyes of a nine year old boy. The translation was well done too, reading smoothly "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lynn Kearney | 1/9/2014

    " A dark story set in Libya before its dictator became a jolly fellow. Seen through the eyes of a not-very-appealing nine year-old. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rick | 1/9/2014

    " Insight into Libya under Gaddafi. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cody | 12/31/2013

    " I'm not sure why I gave up on this, as it really is the most convincing and well-executed of the "child"-narrated tales of atrocity that I have read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sandra | 12/24/2013

    " Reading this for book club, liking the start. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Hermien | 11/29/2013

    " An impressive thought provoking book. Makes you think twice about the liberties we have and so often take for granted. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dilruba Ara | 11/24/2013

    " Controlled language. Sad and beautiful. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rema Mohamd | 9/27/2013

    " changing our beleives just to stay alife without pain its the real death ,, also whatever our life is bad if we love its will the best in our eyes. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Richard | 9/8/2013

    " Khadaffi's Libya through the eyes of a child. Illuminating and disturbing. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Joy | 6/22/2013

    " It's not exactly breaking news that living in a dictatorship with an alcoholic mom is not going to make for a carefree childhood. Still, this book did present a somewhat interesting perspective on how totalitarianism can affect families in the most intimate ways. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ziad | 1/22/2013

    " good story , but i didn't like that it was all from 9 year old boy , he loses focus from main events , maybe it was Hisham matar wish to focus on day to day life under Gaddafi's regime , but it wasn't what i wished to read about Libya "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah | 9/15/2012

    " lovely, if painful, story about a mother-son relationship "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Narjes | 5/16/2012

    " Vivid story about life in Libya in the late 70s and 80s, from a young boy's perspective. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lisa | 10/12/2011

    " Really good read, fiction but you learn a lot about Libya before the revolution. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ctb | 10/6/2011

    " Nothing to make it any more memorable than any other book about life under dictatorship "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Aaron | 5/28/2011

    " Matar's tale of a nine year old boy in 1979 Libya is poignant, sweet, at times cruel and disturbing in its autobiographical echoes. Through his protagonist, the author shows us how childhood development is affected by the world in which we live. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Yahya | 5/8/2011

    " Good read, and describes the horrors of living in Qaddafi's Libya. I highly recommend it. I only gave it 3 stars because personally, I didn't like it all that much; this is my pure very impressionist rating. Objectively though, it is good. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ctb | 5/7/2011

    " Nothing to make it any more memorable than any other book about life under dictatorship "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mbhatia | 5/1/2011

    " Tells the story of Qaddafi's rule in Libya thru the eyes of a 9 year old boy. A coming of age story about a timely subject. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Aaron | 4/4/2011

    " Matar's tale of a nine year old boy in 1979 Libya is poignant, sweet, at times cruel and disturbing in its autobiographical echoes. Through his protagonist, the author shows us how childhood development is affected by the world in which we live. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Samantha | 3/27/2011

    " Rough going at first, so grim initially i found it difficult to stick with. The book is beautifully written and now that I've finished it I am sorely missing it. A book of great human depth. Striking perspective of a boy. I am eagerly awaiting his new book to be released in the U.S. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jessica | 3/22/2011

    " Great story of a child's perspective of political upheaval and the ramifications for his family. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Carol | 3/20/2011

    " The story of post-revolutionary Libya through the eyes of a nine-year-boy who tries to make sense of the insensible. A variety of issues are examined, including the role of women, childhood, resistance, secret police, betrayal, torture, and survival. Timely, important, and interesting. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marilyn | 3/18/2011

    " a fascinating novel following a young boy, son of a rebel under Qadhafi. I almost gave it five stars "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kirsten | 3/17/2011

    " A magnificent book from a child's point of view, when everything is going wrong in the adult world. Very moving. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Terry | 3/6/2011

    " Through the eyes of the 9-year-old narrator we encounter the totality of a totalitarian state's grip on the lives of its citizens. A telling quote from the novel, "Nationalism is as thin as a thread, perhaps that's why many feel it must be anxiously guarded." "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author
Author Hisham Matar

Hisham Matar was born in 1970 in New York City to Libyan parents and spent his childhood in Tripoli and Cairo. His first novel, In the Country of Men, was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, Guardian First Book Award, and National Book Critics Circle Award. It won six international literary awards, including the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize Best First Book Award for Europe and South Asia, the Royal Society of Literature Ondaatje Prize, and the inaugural Arab American Book Award. He currently lives in London.

About the Narrator

Stephen Hoye has worked as a professional actor in London and Los Angeles for more than thirty years. Trained at Boston University and the Guildhall in London, he has acted in television series and six feature films and has appeared in London’s West End.