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Download Imie Rozy (The Name of the Rose) Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Imie Rozy (The Name of the Rose) Audiobook, by Umberto Eco
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (102,468 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Umberto Eco Narrator: Krzysztof Gosztyla Publisher: Oficyna Literacka Noir sur Blanc Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: March 2012 ISBN:
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Listopad 1327 roku. Do znamienitego opactwa benedyktynów w pólnocnych Wloszech przybywa uczony franciszkanin, Wilhelm z Baskerville, któremu towarzyszy uczen i sekretarz, nowicjusz Adso z Melku. W klasztorze panuje ponury nastrój.

Opat zwraca sie do Wilhelma z prosba o pomoc w rozwiklaniu zagadki tajemniczej smierci jednego z mnichów. Sprawa jest naglaca, gdyz za kilka dni w opactwie ma sie odbyc wazna debata teologiczna, w której wezma udzial dostojnicy koscielni, z wielkim inkwizytorem Bernardem Gui na czele. Tymczasem dochodzi do kolejnych morderstw. Przenikliwy Anglik orientuje sie, ze wyjasnienia mrocznego sekretu nalezy szukac w klasztornej bibliotece. Bogaty ksiegozbiór, w którym nie brak dziel uwazanych za niebezpieczne, miesci sie w salach tworzacych labirynt. Intruz moze tam latwo zabladzic, a nawet - jak kraza sluchy - postradac zmysly.

Please note: This audiobook is in Polish.

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Julie Dunn Shedd | 2/19/2014

    " "In that face, deformed by hatred of philosophy, I saw for the first time the portrait of the Antichrist, who does not come from the tribe of Judas, as his heralds have it, or from a far country. The Antichrist can be born from piety itself, from excessive love of God or of the truth, as the heretic is born from the saint and the possessed from the seer. Fear prophets, Adso, and those prepared to die for the truth, for as a rule they make many others die with them, often before them, at times instead of them. Jorge did a diabolical thing because he loved his truth so lewdly that he dared anything in order to destroy falsehood. Jorge feared the second book of Aristotle because it perhaps really did teach how to distort the face of every truth, so that we would not become slaves of our ghosts. Perhaps the mission of those who love mankind is to make people laugh at the truth, to make truth laugh, because the only truth lies in learning to free ourselves from insane passion for the truth." "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Antonis | 2/16/2014

    " This book was so boring, that describing it as such, is simply underestimating the feeling of boredom when reading it. As soon as you get a bit intrigued by the plot, a pointless and huge description of an abbey starts, with no purpose whatsoever. If it's of any importance, I'm an architect, and finding a description of an abbey boring as hell, means that it really is! The plot doesn't get any more exciting afterwards, either. I've tried to read it three times, each of them with the biggest of motivations, however each and every time I managed to quit before reaching its half. Honestly, I wouldn't recommend to anyone reading it. Better watch the movie with Sean Connery. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Eric | 2/7/2014

    " Fun, sophisticated, readable...what more do you want? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jac | 2/6/2014

    " took me forever. hard to see the comparison between eco and borges. enticing, both. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Grace | 2/4/2014

    " if you haven't read this book read it! I love this book it is so so well written i really wish he would have done a series with these monks! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Victor Labrada | 1/18/2014

    " The Name of the Rose is a jumble of abstruse references and philosophical asides melted into a coherent and captivating plot about murder, truth and the lunacy which connects the two. What is amazing about this book is that it is entertaining when it doesn't have to be. Eco could have easily compiled his reflections on religion and semiotics in a less cleverly-written mass of erudition. Instead, he gives us characters who breathe, locations crawling with detail and a plot that is as good as any historical whodunnit. Some will be dismayed with the sometimes excessive amount of Latin and obscure church history, but these all buttress Eco's purpose behind his work. You will have to refer to other works to fully appreciate this one. Just as every book refers to every other. The Name of the Rose will be set alongside the best works of Dostoyesvky as literature that is continually re-translated and re-interpreted; literature that never ceases to speak. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah | 12/24/2013

    " This is a book that I forced myself to read twice - not because I found it confusing, but I wanted to absorb every word that Umberto Eco had written. Every paragraph is a joy to read, every sentence like a poem. This is a book that will leave you full and satisfied after reading! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mary | 10/20/2013

    " Read this a long time ago,but really enjoyed it,,Intrigue,religion,secrets,,kind of like,,well,,,you know "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Caroline | 10/5/2013

    " If there were a six-star rating available, this book would get it. My desert island read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tamara | 9/15/2013

    " I mostly enjoyed the academic debates tbh, I thought the story was a bit... dull. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sara | 7/5/2013

    " Wonderful, but genuinely exhausting to power through. At book club we all agreed about 200 pages of expository historical detail could be removed and the story would still be good. You'll have to be pretty patient (or good at skipping long passages!). "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michal Cierniak | 5/6/2013

    " This is probably one of the best books I've ever read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Handian | 10/6/2012

    " So slow. So long. So difficult "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Aaron Crofut | 9/7/2012

    " Mystery isn't really my genre, but this was a great read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Leila | 9/5/2012

    " a very good one , and the movie is good as well "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Slmcmahon | 8/4/2012

    " This is one of my favorite books. I also enjoyed the movie, starring Sean Connery. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christie | 5/13/2012

    " So much more than a murder mystery - the film version, any film version can't begin to reveal the multiple layers of story and meaning. "

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About the Author
Author Umberto EcoUmberto Eco is an Italian semiotician philosopher, literary critic, and novelist. He is the author of The Name of the Rose, Foucault's Pendulum, and The Prague Cemetery, all bestsellers in many languages, as well as a number of influential scholarly works.