I Live in the Future & Heres How It Works: Why Your World, Work, and Brain Are Being Creatively Disrupted Audiobook, by Nick Bilton Play Audiobook Sample

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I Live in the Future & Heres How It Works: Why Your World, Work, and Brain Are Being Creatively Disrupted Audiobook, by Nick Bilton Play Audiobook Sample
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Author: Nick Bilton Narrator: Mike Chamberlain Publisher: Random House Audio Audio Length: Release Date: September 2010 Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download ISBN: 9780307736581

Publisher Description

Are we driving off a digital cliff and heading for disaster, unable to focus, maintain concentration, or form the human bonds that make life worth living? Are media and business doomed and about to be replaced by amateur hour? The world, as Nick Bilton—with tongue-in-cheek—shows, has been going to hell for a long, long time, and what we are experiencing is the twenty-first-century version of the fear that always takes hold as new technology replaces the old. In fact, as Bilton shows, the digital era we are part of is, in all its creative and disruptive forms, the foundation for exciting and engaging experiences not only for business but society as well. Both visionary and practical, I Live in the Future & Here’s How It Works captures the zeitgeist of an emerging age, providing the understanding of how a radically changed media world is influencing human behavior:    • With a walk on the wild side—through the porn industry—we see how this business model is leading the way, adapting product to consumer needs and preferences and beating piracy.    • By understanding how the Internet is creating a new type of consumer, the “consumnivore,” living in a world where immediacy trumps quality and quantity, we see who is dictating the type of content being created.    • Through exploring the way our brains are adapting, we gain a new understanding of the positive effect of new media narratives on thinking and action. One fascinating study, for example, shows that surgeons who play video games are more skillful than their nonplaying counterparts.    • Why social networks, the openness of the Internet, and handy new gadgets are not just vehicles for telling the world what you had for breakfast but are becoming the foundation for “anchoring communities” that tame information overload and help determine what news and information to trust and consume and what to ignore.    • Why the map of tomorrow is centered on “Me,” and why that simple fact means a totally new approach to the way media companies shape content.    • Why people pay for experiences, not content; and why great storytelling and extended relationships will prevail and enable businesses to engage with customers in new ways that go beyond merely selling information, instead creating unique and meaningful experiences.   I Live in the Future & Here’s How It Works walks its own talk by creating a unique reader experience: Semacodes embedded in both print and eBook versions will take readers directly to Bilton’s website (www.NickBilton.com), where they can access videos of the author further developing his point of view and also delve into the research that was key to shaping the central ideas of the book. The website will also offer links to related content and the ability to comment on a chapter, allowing the reader to join the conversation.

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Customer Reviews

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  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " It reads as long NY Times article and even though there is lots of interesting research mentioned it does not say anything really surprising. But what is great about the book is its optimism and openness to the new. Basically it says that our world is changing and even though this transition might be bumpy there is no need to worry. We have been there before and change is good. It turned me in to a techno-optimist, at least now in a days after reading it. I would definitely recommend it. And it was a first book I bought on my Kindle - impulse buy after I read an article in NY Times about it on my Kindle while traveling in a city tram. "

    - Vratislav, 2/7/2014
  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5

    " I like that he connects all formats to telling a story and how effective getting to that storytelling (content) is crucial. But there isn't much new here. Did think referring to Reader's Digest was the Twitter of that time was amusing. "

    - Chris, 2/5/2014
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " I now feel very knowledgeable about technology use in the porn industry. No, really! I also got some great arguments for calming the panic about how "paper is dead, and we're all moving to eReaders." And that the interwebs is not the death of us all, despite what I hear all the time. Definitely worth the read, but maybe not at the beach like I did. "

    - Beth, 1/12/2014
  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5

    " Good book club book because of the discussion topics. It is well written and easy read, but nothing really new here. Particularly for people in this group. "

    - Angie, 1/11/2014
  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5

    " A nice, breezy review of the changes that are underway. Unlike books by Clay Shirky or the Forrester books ("Groundswell" and ""Empowered"), I found far less to underline and dogear. "

    - John, 1/10/2014
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " The book every Andew Keen/Jaron Lanier/Mark Helprin types, lawmaker, movie, record label, and news executive should read but probably won't. "

    - Nick, 12/26/2013
  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5

    " I have always enjoyed Bilton's writing in The Times. Although I did not learn incredibly much from the book, it provided a decent review of the current state of technology. "

    - Alexander, 11/21/2013
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " Basic for those of us already 'living in the future' (i..e working, playing, shopping, banking, etc) online, but a great eye opener for those who still don't understand the seismic social and cultural shifts underway. "

    - Yuri, 10/24/2013
  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5

    " Interesting contrast to The Shallows, but not very in-depth. "

    - Occam98, 8/4/2013
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " A should-read book for knowledge workers and entrepreneurs on concepts and social trends. "

    - Lori, 12/16/2012
  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5

    " you lost me at "[eating] bytes, snacks and meals" nick bilton, and you'll never have me back. "

    - Lauren, 11/17/2012
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " Good read. Quick overview of how technology is changing how we live - and what might be next. "

    - Rosemary, 8/26/2012
  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5

    " interesting, fascinating glimpse of where technology can take us. recommend to anyone interested in the future of mass media. "

    - Anita, 3/20/2012
  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5

    " The internet is good, I guess? Stopped on page 164 of 266. "

    - Adam, 1/16/2012
  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5

    " I finally get to learn about 4square. Otherwise this had some interesting info on current social networking technology. "

    - Beth, 1/7/2012
  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5

    " This was a good primer to a lot of the trends that are shaping our current and future world, but I found it was a bit too basic for someone who is already paying attention to many of these trends. "

    - Dave, 9/4/2011
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " Really getting into this one. It seems like a great book for any information professional. Never realized the porn industry and librarians had similar battles! "

    - Michelle, 2/21/2011
  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5

    " Too obvious, adds very little to the general knowledge regarding the future of innovation, at least for people that take the time to read stuff like Wired magazine. "

    - Martín, 11/23/2010
  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5

    " you lost me at "[eating] bytes, snacks and meals" nick bilton, and you'll never have me back. "

    - Lauren, 10/18/2010

About the Author

Nick Bilton is a special correspondent for Vanity Fair, where he writes about technology, business, and culture, and is a contributor at CNBC. He was a columnist for the New York Times for almost a decade.

About the Narrator

Mike Chamberlain is an actor and voice-over performer in Los Angeles whose audiobook narration has won several AudioFile Earphones Awards. His voice credits range from radio commercials and television narration to animation and video game characters. Stage trained at Boston College, he has performed works from Shakespeare and the classics to contemporary drama and comedy.