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Download How the Universe Got Its Spots: Diary of a Finite Time in a Finite Space Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample How the Universe Got Its Spots: Diary of a Finite Time in a Finite Space (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Janna Levin
3.58 out of 53.58 out of 53.58 out of 53.58 out of 53.58 out of 5 3.58 (0 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Janna Levin Narrator: Christine Williams Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc. Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2009 ISBN:
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The gifted young cosmologist Janna Levin sets out to determine the size of the universe, along the way providing an intimate look at the day-to-day life of a globe-trotting physicist. Nimbly synthesizing geometry, topology, and chaos and string theories, Levin shows how the pattern of hot and cold spots left over from the Big Bang may one day reveal the size and shape of the cosmos. She does so with such originality, lucidity, and even poetry, that How the Universe Got Its Spots becomes a thrilling and deeply personal communication between a scientist and the lay listener. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jane | 3/18/2011

    " This book is fascinating and sometimes poetic, but the author's attempts to draw parallels in Godel's and Turing's lives are heavy-handed in places. That's the only reason I'm giving it four stars instead of five. Still, I'm looking forward to more from Janna Levin. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chris | 3/11/2011

    " I can't come up with a better way to describe this than: mathematician fan fic.

    But it's good. A quick read. And very sad, mostly because Turing and Gödel had such sad lives, in the end. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brian | 1/31/2011

    " Pretty great book for being written by a physicist. Equal parts fiction, history and poetry. A quick read, too! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Doris | 1/2/2011

    " Janna Levin breathes life into her characters from a pen dipped in a magical, lyrical language. She dwells more on the humanity of her famous subjects than on their theorems, giving the reader an immediate intimacy with them. An amazing literary talent. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Lindsay | 12/31/2010

    " Levin is clearly a scientist first and an author second. I disliked almost everything about this novel, from the poor, under-developed themes of truth and reality to the bland and lacking "plot" with a barely visible thread linking the three scientists' lives. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kirsty | 12/7/2010

    "

    Declaring literary blogging bankruptcy as I'm now eight months behind on logging books read and I would like to get back into the swing of things without dropping further behind!

    "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Glynn | 10/24/2010

    " This was an excellent read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Canton | 5/18/2010

    " Wonderful and informative. Straddles a very interesting line between fiction & biography.

    A great read if you're at all a fan of Turing or Gödel.

    Dark ending. Un-light. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rose | 4/17/2010

    " Such a thin line between genius and madness! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rob | 4/3/2010

    " Interesting back story about the man and the math behind the invention of the computer. "

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About the Author
Author Janna LevinJANNA LEVIN is a professor of physics and astronomy at Barnard College of Columbia University. She is also director of sciences at Pioneer Works, a center for arts and sciences in Brooklyn, and has contributed to an understanding of black holes, the cosmology of extra dimensions, and gravitational waves in the shape of spacetime. Her previous books include How the Universe Got Its Spots and a novel, A Madman Dreams of Turing Machines, which won the PEN/Bingham Prize. She was recently named a Guggenheim fellow.
About the Narrator

Christine Williams is an actor and singer with extensive experience on both the theater and concert stages.