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3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,091 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Tom Wolfe Narrator: Tom Wolfe, Ron Rifkin Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2000 ISBN: 9780743519199
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Only yesterday boys and girls spoke of embracing and kissing (necking) as getting to first base. Second base was deep kissing, plus groping and fondling this and that. Third base was oral sex. Home plate was going all the way. That was yesterday. Here in the year 2000 we can forget about necking. Today's girls and boys have never heard of anything that dainty. Today's first base is deep kissing, now known as tonsil hockey, plus groping and fondling this and that. Second base is oral sex. Third base is going all the way. Home plate is learning each other's names. And how rarely our hooked-up boys and girls learn each other's names!
Tom Wolfe ranges from coast to coast, chronicling everything from the sexual manners and mores of teenagers...to fundamental changes in the way human beings now regard themselves, thanks to the hot new fields of genetics and neuroscience...to the reasons why, at the dawn of a new millennium, no one is celebrating the second American Century.
Hooking Up is a chronicle of the here and now. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “I love Tom Wolfe. Whenever some big bizarro thing happens I want the man in the white suit to do his usual exhausting reporting, turn the labels inside out and the hypocrites upside down…and tell me what’s what in one of those jittering, dazzling riffs of his.”

    New York Times

  • “The book’s title is a sexual metaphor, but in Wolfe’s hands, it means making connections among the culture’s disparate corners. And nobody hooks up better than he does.”

    Newsweek

  • “The rich retrospective of one of America’s finest writers.”

    Baltimore Sun

  • “His fans will find plenty of evidence that Wolfe remains willing to plunge into ‘the raw, raucous, lust-soaked rout that throbs with amped-up octophonic typanum all around him’ and that—especially in his nonfiction—he can still grab the brass ring.”

    Publishers Weekly (starred review)

  • “Wolfe takes potentially boring subjects and turns them into a verbose tour de force…his style of writing is awe inspiring.”

    Library Journal

  • A USA Today Bestseller

Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Loyd | 2/17/2014

    " I love everything about Tom Wolfe's writing. It's brash, energetic, insightful, interesting, and always keeps you hungry for more. Hooking Up is a collection of essays on a variety of topics, from the sexual anthropology of today's campuses, jealously in literary criticism, to how a small midwestern college became the model for Silicon Valley. Wonderful stuff. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lil Sparrow | 2/13/2014

    " I had my reservations when my father started pushing this book on me, and I'm still not sure he should go around recommending this to every niece and nephew of his, but it was definitely worth the read. The short stoy is questionable, but the essays were exceedingly well researched and well written. They were a pleasure to read and rather thought provoking, if somewhat dated. I'll be keeping an eye out for his older work. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Leslie | 2/6/2014

    " Collection of mostly non-fiction essays. Fascinating stuff about the 1st guys (one went west from MIT) getting the microchip industry going in California. Other sound essays about American culture changing over the years. There is one great novella within "Ambush at Ft. Bragg" "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 W.B. | 1/25/2014

    " This is cobbled together creation, rather a literary Frankenstein's monster, a pastiche of various essays with some fiction thrown in, but it's actually a very rewarding read. You don't have to like the man or share his values to appreciate his ability to understand history's machinations, to trace trends and cultural tendencies with a rarely rivaled acumen. I don't share many of his values, and do find him to be an unremittent elitist (which is always an embarrassment for readers) but I still found this book very interesting for the way it traced the genesis of the internet and subsquent shifts globally in mores and values. He's been such a diligent reader in so many disciplines that he has much really worthwhile information to share. Yes, much of this is delivered in his trademark smarmy tone, and in a self-congratulatory gesture he includes some early essays that earned him notoriety in the literary world ("Tiny Mummies" is one of these) which really don't fit the tenor of the book at all. You might be surprised how dated and irrelevant these essays are now, and Wolfe admits as much even as he can't help including them. The man probably realizes the Elysian fields where literary snobs presumably graze on leatherbound D.W.E.M. lit for eternity cannot be that far off, and this sense of mortality has sharpened his vision somewhat. He sneers overmuch (and feel free to sneer back) but I guarantee you will come away with some very interesting backstory on our little god, the internet, and proabably a few other tangential subjects to boot. I know I did, and am grateful for having endured his pallid, often bloodless sense of life. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lance Cahill | 1/21/2014

    " Hit and miss. "Two young men who went west", "in the land of the rococo Marxists", and the "the great relearning" are worth the price of admission but the others include writing that is at times pedantic (even for Wolfe) and prurient with no utility. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Fran | 1/6/2014

    " I have been a Tom Wolfe fan since the late 60's, and I was SO DISAPPOINTED in his HORRIBLE "Charlotte Simmons". You can see parallels between it and the essay that titles this collection. But thank goodness this collection of several essays and one novella restores my admiration and faith in Tom. In fact, some of the essays are almost luminous, and they certainly are illuminating!!!! THANK YOU TOM WOLFE! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Derek Baldwin | 1/2/2014

    " Now that I'm a grumpy old fogey it's especially enjoyable reading Mr Wolfe's sneering essays on yoof culture and other modern superficialities. Possibly his best collection, or perhaps it's just that I've come to see things more the way he does as the years go by. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Leigh Anne | 12/18/2013

    " A little dated.... but interesting. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeff | 11/30/2013

    " The essay on Frederick Hart is great. So is the essay "In the Land of the Rococo Marxists." "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Kendra | 8/24/2013

    " I have no idea what the point of this book was. I couldn't get into it. I put it down without finishing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Greg | 7/20/2013

    " The birth of Silicon Valley is particularly entertaining. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Kathleen | 7/3/2013

    " Tom Wolfe is one of American's literary nonfiction greats, but he fails here trying to explore contemporary youth culture. However, his writing is superb as always. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cindy | 6/22/2013

    " OK maybe only 3.5 stars but I love this author. Met the man in full white-suited presence when he was inspiring young journalists at UF in 2000 and researching this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bruce Reiter | 11/2/2012

    " I like Tom Wolfe as an essayist. I am not quite as keen on him as a novelist nor did I like him taking to task the people who denigrated his writing ability. I would recommend this book to those who like his essay style. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Roberto | 8/17/2012

    " Thanks Mr. Wolfe. I belive never unknow what meaning first base, second and others. But, understand where are gone in my life. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Melissa | 7/7/2012

    " Anyone who is a fan of Tom Wolfe's style of prose will enjoy this book. It wasn't my favorite of his, but definitely worth reading. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Griff | 5/18/2012

    " Fascinating group of essays and short stories that range over numerous topics and ideas, somehow are interrelated. Commentary on truth, existence, limits of science, nature of art, etc. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lauren | 12/13/2011

    " Tom Wolfe's first book of shorts... really interesting mix. I like some better than others- there is a journalism flair to this and he discusses his own work, including the 11 year wait between his first two novels, The Bonfire of the Vanities and A Man in Full. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Vanessa | 3/15/2011

    " This book was not worth reading past the first chapter...just couldn't get into it, and failed to see how the first chapter was anywhere remotely related to what was described on the book jacket. And if he uses the word "insouciant" one more time, I think I will cringe. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 david shin | 3/3/2011

    " i think Tom Wolfe is one of those modern geniuses in writing. So fun to read, and deeply insightful. I would recommend this book to anyone. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hubert | 3/2/2011

    " I actually think Wolfe's non-fiction writing is much more compelling than his recent novels. This tome solidifies his standing as an avid and intelligent commentator on contemporary American culture. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kate | 12/23/2010

    " Sorry, but your soul just died.

    Earn one's worsteds! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 J. | 7/31/2010

    " This particular book b Tom Wolfe was to me ok, or in other words fair. It did not capture me or get me going with it. Sorry.

    J. Robert Ewbank author "John Wesley, Natural Man, and the 'Isms'" "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lauren | 7/9/2010

    " Tom Wolfe's first book of shorts... really interesting mix. I like some better than others- there is a journalism flair to this and he discusses his own work, including the 11 year wait between his first two novels, The Bonfire of the Vanities and A Man in Full. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Thomas | 6/2/2010

    " I thought this book sucked. It seemed to me that Wolfe, previously an acute observer of the American Social Scene, has lost touch with the common realities of American life. Give this one a pass. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Kendra | 3/8/2010

    " I have no idea what the point of this book was. I couldn't get into it. I put it down without finishing. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jeff | 1/21/2010

    " I originally got the book because Grinnell College and legendary professor Grant Gale were featured. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gregory | 12/26/2009

    " Fantastic! Some essays are for mature readers only (the content is adult-level, and Wolfe is a realist), but his survey of modern culture is penetrating ... and fun to read! He even made the history of computers a page-turner. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Griff | 11/3/2009

    " Fascinating group of essays and short stories that range over numerous topics and ideas, somehow are interrelated. Commentary on truth, existence, limits of science, nature of art, etc. "

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About the Author
Author Tom WolfeTom Wolfe is the author of more than a dozen books, among them such bestselling contemporary classics as The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, The Right Stuff, The Bonfire of the Vanities, A Man in Full, and I Am Charlotte Simmons. A native of Richmond, Virginia, he earned his B.A. at Washington and Lee University and a Ph.D. in American studies at Yale. He received the National Book Foundation's 2010 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in New York City.
About the Narrator
Ron Rifkin has appeared in the films Wolf and JFK, starred on Broadway in Arthur Miller's Broken Glass and has played recurring roles on television in the series The Trials of Rosie O'Neill and the award-winning drama series ER.