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Extended Audio Sample Heart of Darkness Audiobook, by Joseph Conrad Click for printable size audiobook cover
3.35 out of 53.35 out of 53.35 out of 53.35 out of 53.35 out of 5 3.35 (263 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Joseph Conrad Narrator: Scott Brick Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: July 2008 ISBN: 9781400178469
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Heart of Darkness is a short but compelling novel which follows the journey of the narrator, Marlow, into the heart of Africa at the height of the British empire. Marlow is shocked by what he sees when he first arrives in Africa — the inhumane manner in which the British officers treat the natives who are forced to work in chain gangs, malnourished and whipped for any mistakes they might make. After this initial shock, he takes up his post and, while waiting for his steamer to be repaired, takes stock of the men he's going to work with, learning about their petty rivalries.

The station manager, in particular, has something against a man named Kurtz who works further inland and the more Marlow hears about Kurtz, the more curious he becomes. He finally boards the steamer with a crew consisting of a few white men whom he calls "pilgrims" because they always carry long wooden staves, and a number of black men or "cannibals." The steamer is attacked when it reaches Kurtz' territory but Marlow finally manages to get the natives to back off.

This is when Marlow finally meets Kurtz, although his curiosity about the man has been further whetted by a meeting with a Russian who brings news of him. Marlow doesn't understand why there is such an aura of mystery around Kurtz but when he meets him, he realizes that Kurtz has gone a little crazy in this foreign land. On the one hand, he seems to rule over the natives like a king but on the other hand, he also hates them and, in a famous line, says "exterminate all the brutes." Kurtz is also fatally ill and dies on board the steamer, before reaching England.

In a sense, Conrad sets Kurtz up as a symbol of the British Empire ruling over Africa and other colonies all around the world. Conrad's implication is that although Britain lorded it over the colonies and benefitted greatly from the trade, it lost the moral high ground by treating human beings as less than they really were.

Joseph Conrad was of Polish Ukrainian descent but he traveled a great deal throughout his life, living in France and finally becoming a British subject. Heart of Darkness is based on his journey to Africa and what he encountered there. When the novel was written, many people didn't even realize that this was meant to be a commentary on British imperialism; they merely thought of it as a description of an alien, exotic place. Now, of course, we recognize Conrad's commentary in the book and also his struggle to accept that he belonged with a set of people who were denuding Africa of all its riches. Incidentally, Conrad didn't learn English until his twenties but his grasp of the language was so strong that he went on to write Heart of Darkness and several other novels, including Lord Jim, which have become literary classics.

Download Heart of Darkness now from The Audio Bookstore for a brutal and honest depiction of the British Empire in Africa.

Horror awaits Charlie Marlow, a seaman assigned by an ivory company to retrieve a cargo boat along with one of its employees, Mr. Kurtz, who is stranded deep in the heart of the Belgian Congo. Marlow’s journey up the brooding dark river soon becomes a struggle to maintain his own sanity as he witnesses the brutalization of the natives by white traders and then discovers the enigmatic Mr. Kurtz. Kurtz, once a genius and the company’s most successful representative, has become a savage; his compound is decorated by a row of human heads mounted on spears. It soon becomes clear that the demonic mastermind, liberated from the conventions of European culture, has traded his soul to become ruler of his own horrific dominion.

Acclaimed to be one of the great, albeit disturbing, visionary works of western civilization, Joseph Conrad’s haunting tale dramatizes the stark realities of Africa in the colonial period. Heart of Darkness reflects the physical and psychological tragedies that Conrad had experienced while working in the Belgian Congo in 1890. It is also the basis of Francis Ford Coppola’s Academy Award–winning film Apocalypse Now.

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kosta Karakashyan | 2/20/2014

    " The language was fascinating, but from a contemporary point of view, I found it extremely difficult to actually connect with the story. I enjoyed reading it as a whole, but I felt it was missing something. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lex | 2/20/2014

    " Profound, hypnotically written with metaphors and allegory (and looong descriptions) in abundance. It was probably the most difficult read of my life and I think a lot went past my head though. Here's one I definitely have to return to later. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Annalise | 2/19/2014

    " slept at every 1/2 page "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Todd | 2/18/2014

    " Technically interesting. Very dense. Excellent tho disturbing descriptions. Odd having an immense build up to meet the major object of the book only to have him die a few pages later. Many unanswered questions. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Carmen | 2/17/2014

    " I could appreciate it for the great piece of literature it was, but I didn't really enjoy it. One of those books everyone should read and appreciate, but may not enjoy. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Butterfly | 2/16/2014

    " I've read this at least three different times for school/uni and it never made a huge impression on me. All I remember is "The horror! The horror!" Definitely worth a read, though, if only to compare it to Apocalypse Now. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rachel Poe | 2/15/2014

    " I read this book for English and I surprisingly enjoyed it. Granted, I wasn't floored by it but it was alright. Pretty dense material but great descriptions. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Robert Hudder | 2/15/2014

    " Another classic book that draws you in. A travelogue through the worst of mankind. Well worth the early pain as the trip takes place. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 suzyq | 2/15/2014

    " Required for Post 1800 Lit Hist Class. I read it...What would you say about it? "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Nathan Kellari-tranter | 2/13/2014

    " I really did not like this book. Reading the summary I was expecting something dark and beautiful, that painted (excuse the pun) a picture in your head like the story of Dorian Gray. Something that made you shiver and something that really made you think. I felt myself with Heart of Darkness constantly tracking back in pages and paragraphs trying to re-read as I was constantly feeling as if I had missed something. There is no flow to this story, I never could picture the scene or follow where in the story I was. To be honest I found it a chore, and did not enjoy the abrupt ending or draw anything deeper from its vague and far out style. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sophie Tallis | 2/13/2014

    " An extraordinary work of pure genius. The throbbing menace of the landscape Conrad takes you through is matched perfectly by the brooding inner dialogue of a character utterly lost with himself. A spiral into madness and the things that drive us. Wonderful! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jesse Markus | 2/12/2014

    " This is some great classic huh? I've meant to get around to reading this for the last ten years or so. This is Joseph Conrad, huh? This is the acclaimed Heart of Darkness. This was the inspiration for Apocalypse Now, eh? I was bored to death and couldn't wait to finish this book. So, they're looking for Kurtz, they find Kurtz, Kurtz dies, Marlow talks to Kurtz's wife, The End. How lame is that? And why does Marlow have to say 'nigger' all the time? At least it's a short book. Don't waste your time! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Katie | 2/12/2014

    " It was kind of boring. Which was disappointing as I'd heard good things about it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mairi-c | 2/12/2014

    " Best read aloud to oneself... try it, it brings the richness and darkness of the book alive. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Blair Beveridge | 2/11/2014

    " This book, and the famous movie based off of it we both very depressing experiences for me. I can recognize the angle, the purpose and the meanign of this book, but at the end of the day it depressed me "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ehi | 2/11/2014

    " I actually really enjoyed this novel. Many people see it as racist. Honestly, Conrad was a man of his time, and there are racist aspects of this book, but I do not believe he was and I do not believe that is the main point of this novel either. Yes, he compares the savages to the Heart fo Darkness , but he also compares Kurt. I tend to focus more on Kurt. After having a discussion in class about this, many people seemed to believe that Kurt was not a bad guy. Some could argue that Africa changed Kurt and that Africa was the real Darkness. Kurt had just become one with the darkness, but that is not how I picture this novel. I see Kurt as the true darkness. He is persuasive, manipulative, and cunning; he would have been a great politician! lol He created an entire empire with natives praising him. That is just my opinion. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gary Dale | 2/11/2014

    " Conrad is a master at setting a mood and mood is what you felt on every single page of this classic. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lisa Lenox | 2/11/2014

    " Conraf was a scary dude- looking so deep into the hearts of men and finding them so tragically wanting. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Avery | 2/10/2014

    " A true literary master, Conrad effortlessly combined symbolism, depth, and character development to create the Heart of Darkness. However, I found no true effortless reading within the novel- the entirety of it, while an immortal masterpiece to Conrad's credit- was too high in level for my feeble mind. I only rate it so low for the sake of the fact that I could barely understand a sentence- to no fault of Conrad's. I have decided to perhaps explore more of Conrad's work, hoping that I will fall upon a title I can actually grasp! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dave | 2/10/2014

    " This and Lord Jim are my two favorite Conrads. Anything I write about Conrad and this book could not do it justice. Probably my favorite author of all time. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gary Gilbert | 2/10/2014

    " Glad I finally read this book. After seeing Apocalypse Now and the hearing of the trouble Orson Welles had making the book into a film, I was really looking forward to reading the book. I can see how the book raised the awareness of the mistreatment of Africans in the Congo. While reading the story, I could not keep from thinking of the horrors Joseph Conrad saw on his trip to the Congo that influenced this book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Yana | 2/10/2014

    " This is one of my favorite western literature. It may be boring at first glimpse but it provides broader knowledge and understanding regarding the situation of both blacks and whites during the peak of colonialism in the west. It is creative and mind boggling. I like it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Christy | 2/9/2014

    " Heart of Darkness is a classic novella, presented in the form of a story within a story. In 1998, it was ranked 67th on the list of Modern Library Top 100 English Language Novels of the 20th Century. It tells the story of Charles Marlowe, an ivory transporter, and his journey down the Congo River. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Will | 2/8/2014

    " I decided to re-read this for the first time since high school after reading Adam Hochschild's King Leopold's Ghost. I'm not sure how it was received at the time it was written. I assume it was shocking. But,if anything, it is too tame. In this case truth really is stranger (or more horrible) than fiction. Knowing that this is a TRUE STORY did enhance the experience. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bryan | 2/7/2014

    " I enjoyed this book a lot more than I thought I would. It is dense but worth the effort. A good 'literary' read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dina | 2/7/2014

    " Enjoyable story telling with emotional and moody language. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kelly Wortham Wick | 2/7/2014

    " Very interesting read,beware of the racial slurs. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Rachel | 2/6/2014

    " I hate this book with every ounce of my being "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rmry68 | 2/5/2014

    " Liked it but a bit hard to follow. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Brian Parshall | 2/4/2014

    " This book is such a tough read, but is well worth it in the overall meaning. I am not a huge reader myself, but after being challenged with the enourmous task of analyzing and dissecting this novella for my AP Literature class I honestly think I can read anything. At first I took this book for the rantings and ravings of a rascist author whose only talent was that of geography, and his recount of the savagery in a forsaken jungle through the eyes of Marlow. Upon further inspection the meaning behind the words seemingly unwound itself, becoming a masterpiece of human nature. Conrad uses this book as a medium to relay his thoughts about imperialism, the effects of it such as madness, the absurdity of evil, and how the brooding storm created by these themes and motifs settles over the Congo in this time period. The background information such as where this was written (in England) and when it was written (1898-1899) play an important role in the overall meaning, since this was the prime time of imperialism in Africa. This is a dark time for the congo where the whole mission of these imperialistic countries was to bring light to the savages and where better than the 'Heart of Darkness' itself, the Congo. What really happened was not quite so enlightening, Marlow recounts the violence and brutality that ensues on his journey through the Congo. The imagery from the darkness of the Thames river, the snake like shape of the Amazon, and the description of the way the dark waters run into the dark sky on the even darker horizon contribute to the overall motif of darkness. What makes a Novella like this a masterpiece is the ability it has to connect so strongly to the reader, and how it expresses such abstract concepts as the pilgrims being the real savages, and how this whole enlightenment concept is a false pretense to conquer a foreign land and enslave its people. This is where the theme of human efficiency ties in and I linked it to the book 'A Brave New World' where human efficiency is pushed beyond its limits, creating a utopian society based on consumption and control, which is pretty close to the practice of imperialism, except imperialists never bothered to try and make their slave-citizens happy, and they never tried to disguise their true intentions, Bringing together the themes and motifs of Savage, and civilized, and native, and foreign. The genuine brilliance of this book is that it can't be summed up in a review, That you have to read it for yourself, and realize the beauty in it, which is different for everyone, The whole reason I am writing this review is to inspire those who thought like I did, not wanting to continue on and finish the book, or if you haven't started already to go buy a copy and discover 'The Heart Of Darkness' for yourself. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jessa | 2/4/2014

    " Everyone needs at least one exposure to this book, as the phrase "the heart of darkness" carries so much punch in so few words - so long as you know the ideas and mores of the story. One of those cultural references that you should know well in order to be truly literate. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Claira Gildersleeve | 2/2/2014

    " Very thought provoking. Had a hard time getting over the way that Conrad writes but after that I really liked the book as a whole. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Frederic Pierce | 2/2/2014

    " It is the archetype of dark travelogues into the unknown. A story that works on many levels, telling the story of an internal journey wrapped in an external trip. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ema | 2/1/2014

    " I mean, I liked the concept, but concerning readability (a must, for me), it was... barbarous. I was made to read it in my freshman year of high school, so that was some time ago, but even so... Perhaps I should chance a second read, but, really, it's one of those books that I was glad to have read, rather than enjoyed reading. On that note, everyone should be forced to read this (or something like it) at least once in their formative years. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mark Spano | 1/30/2014

    " Mr. Kurtz is fascinating in his embodiment of evil. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ken Sbeghen | 1/29/2014

    " A masterpiece portraying the horrors and atrocities of colonialism. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 djcb | 1/27/2014

    " I know the symbolism is dripping from each page, but I never really got into the story... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jessica Johnson | 1/24/2014

    " My AP Literature teacher said reading this book would be "A Badge of Honor" so I started reading with the expectation of difficulty but also with excitement. Finishing this novel was long and boring and I did not like it or see its importance. When we discussed it in class, still wasn't a huge fan. When midterm exams came along and I had to write a deep essay about it and truly ponder its meaning, I began to finally get it. I had an epiphany and actually like it. Its not fun, its not easy, but it is a badge of honor. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kenneth | 1/24/2014

    " Joseph Conrad is one of my favorite English novelists. Chronologically speaking, I would argue that Conrad is the next great novelist following Charles Dickens (though I'd be willing to discuss Thomas Hardy). Like Dickens, most people first encounter Conrad in their high school English class - that is, in the worst possible context, unless you're one of the lucky few to have a stellar teacher. Worse yet, most folks are forced to read Heart of Darkness (and A Tale of Two Cities, in Dickens' case), not because of the book's inherent literary value but rather, I suspect, because of the perceived historical lessons a student may draw from it. Indeed, this was where I first encountered Conrad, but later I had the pleasure of reading his entire canon as a grad student and fell in love with books like Lord Jim and Chance: A Tale in Two Parts. It's been at least ten years since I last read Heart of Darkness and reading it today, far removed from high school and grad school or any school really, I was able to encounter it with completely fresh eyes. It is a very strange book - the manner of its storytelling is infamously odd, its subject matter is at once harsh in substance yet foggy in presentation, and in some ways, the action never rises to at least this reader's expectations. Still, it is so mesmerizing in its evocation of mystery and its use of repetition that I feel its poetic aspects are what make this book so special and persistent in my memory. For book lovers, the new Penguin Deluxe Classics Edition is a great book object - appropriately spooky cover artwork by Mike Mignola, plus nice touches like French flaps, a rough front and deckled pages. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rakhi Dalal | 1/24/2014

    " The last pages were my favorite! Though there might not be any connection between the two, but they consistently kept me reminding of "The Fall" by Albert Camus. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ariel | 1/22/2014

    " A good story, with interesting political implications about 19th century colonialism. Bit too descriptive for my taste, but there you have it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gorfo | 1/22/2014

    " After reading Heart of Darkness you begin to wonder if there's any hope for the human race at all. A darkness lingers around the edges of your heart, leaving you with the uneasy feeling that everything noble that you've previously held in esteem is nothing but a pile of rancid hippo meat and lies. Conrad & Marlow spin a tale of gloom and deception, enshrined within the deepest reaches of the Congo, were logic fails, madness prevails, savagery reigns, and the darkness is king. It's a world where a smile means death and light means pain. Racism, misogyny and the noble or cruel Mr. Kurtz. This book reminds us all that "we live in the flicker...But the darkness was here yesterday." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Melanie | 1/22/2014

    " It took me weeks to get through this book in college because it was heavy and dark. It was hard to read it, it was difficult to put myself in the characters' shoes in any way, I felt little empathy. It made me uncomfortable, sick to my stomach at times, but I had to pushed through and felt a little exhausted afterward. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rowan | 1/22/2014

    " I had to read it aloud to get anywhere, even though it's only short. I'd be pacing up and down my living room. The imagery and detail is so sprawling, graphic and nuanced that you have to be as energised as the writer to meet the text. But Jee, is he a great writer tackling the sad and the transcendent, yes, sir. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Deirdre | 1/21/2014

    " The language and somewhat un-PC bits made it difficult to approach at times, but I really enjoyed the plot and overall themes. The story of Kurtz's downfall is truly fascinating. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Robin | 1/21/2014

    " I didn't realise just how much of this book was lifted directly for Apocalypse Now. This book has endlessly creative turns of phrase. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lttlmsprefect07 | 1/20/2014

    " This intensely descriptive novel became even more impressive once I learned this was written in Conrad's third language. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kelly S. | 1/18/2014

    " Read this because Connor had to for AP 12. Excellent book. Deep.... dark.... but great. Novella. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Merve | 1/18/2014

    " dark, dark and dark..mysterious, obscure but engrossing. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Suzie | 1/18/2014

    " I don't recommend it. . . . . . "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alexandra | 1/17/2014

    " Very useful...now I just have to read the book again... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gorfo | 1/16/2014

    " After reading Heart of Darkness you begin to wonder if there's any hope for the human race at all. A darkness lingers around the edges of your heart, leaving you with the uneasy feeling that everything noble that you've previously held in esteem is nothing but a pile of rancid hippo meat and lies. Conrad & Marlow spin a tale of gloom and deception, enshrined within the deepest reaches of the Congo, were logic fails, madness prevails, savagery reigns, and the darkness is king. It's a world where a smile means death and light means pain. Racism, misogyny and the noble or cruel Mr. Kurtz. This book reminds us all that "we live in the flicker...But the darkness was here yesterday." "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Janelle | 1/16/2014

    " One of the most boring books I ever had to read in high school. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Deirdre | 1/13/2014

    " The language and somewhat un-PC bits made it difficult to approach at times, but I really enjoyed the plot and overall themes. The story of Kurtz's downfall is truly fascinating. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jesse Markus | 1/13/2014

    " This is some great classic huh? I've meant to get around to reading this for the last ten years or so. This is Joseph Conrad, huh? This is the acclaimed Heart of Darkness. This was the inspiration for Apocalypse Now, eh? I was bored to death and couldn't wait to finish this book. So, they're looking for Kurtz, they find Kurtz, Kurtz dies, Marlow talks to Kurtz's wife, The End. How lame is that? And why does Marlow have to say 'nigger' all the time? At least it's a short book. Don't waste your time! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kerry | 1/13/2014

    " I know it's a classic...I read it in high school and hated it, then re-read large sections of it along side State of Wonder. I appreciated it more as an adult but still not a book I really want to curl up with... "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Theresa | 1/13/2014

    " My opinion might be tainted by the class I was in when I read this, but seriously boring stuff here... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dina | 1/11/2014

    " Enjoyable story telling with emotional and moody language. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Elmo Ensio | 1/11/2014

    " One star for the vivid language that took me into the mood and story. Second star because I finished the book despite the story, which I thought to be a bit boring and meaningless. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Chantal Emond | 1/5/2014

    " Well, it's not 200 pages first of all. Only 78 pages. Good story. Dark, hence its name, but good :) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Witch'sCat | 1/5/2014

    " A masterpiece! We had discussions on this book during our lectures and they were all so full of life! There are so many questions in this book that you just have to ask...though the answers aren't always simple. But you can find that out for yourselves ;) "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 suzyq | 1/4/2014

    " Required for Post 1800 Lit Hist Class. I read it...What would you say about it? "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Anna | 1/3/2014

    " Boring book. Found it extremely wordy and author sexist. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bob | 1/1/2014

    " Fascinating story; I'm left with unanswered questions, but I suppose that's what Conrad intended. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Carl Williams | 12/30/2013

    " One of the very first "modern" novels and one of the finest. So much beautiful writing and such a dark story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Parth | 12/29/2013

    " What could i say about it that hasn't already been said in the novel itself, not even a faint glimpse of an idea. This novel is as much about African colonization as it is about the affairs of your country. This is a novel purely about human psychology and the darkness that abides in one character's heart, the narrator, Marlowe. It is seldom about the journey and even less about the experiences. It deals only in the darkness that can fill your heart once you've spent enough time in a desolate place. The psychoanalytic strength of this novel could hardly be bettered in any book ever written. Having said that, the ending, especially the line when he talks about people who go on with their petty lives and miserable affairs without giving a thought to life hardly interest him just because he has seen so much that it elevates his understanding of the enigma called life to a completely different level. I salute Joseph Conrad for turning such a simple story line into such a delicate and precarious tale about human nature itself. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Annie | 12/26/2013

    " Fiction/Classic: very difficult read but a good exploration in discovering other cultures "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joemodz | 12/26/2013

    " This could be the greatest short novel of all time! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Kent | 12/23/2013

    " I struggled to understand the point, and that's because I missed some key insights along the way. This novel was too subtle for me. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Jennifer | 12/22/2013

    " I have no idea what I just read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Stuart | 12/22/2013

    " Great book. So descriptive of the darkness of the mind (and the heart). Interesting style, too, told as Marlow's narrative to his compatriots about the experience. Knowing that "Apocalypse Now" was loosely based on this book, or at least paid homage to it, I kept looking for similarities. There were, some, obliviously, but one of the striking differences is that Kurtz in the novel is physically weakened, but I don't think that in the movie version he was. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Josh Graml | 12/21/2013

    " Not exactly a fun read, but it's still worth the effort. Tells a fascinating story populated by interesting characters. I went as Marlowe for Halloween last year. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Loic | 12/8/2013

    " a masterpiece, adapted by coppola on the big screen as "apocalypse now". "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Matt Hartman | 12/8/2013

    " As a reader, I like it when an author is able to draw my attention and use language that doesn't make reading confusing. I didn't like Joseph Conrad's writing style at all, due to his wierd verbiage and repetitive nature in his sentances. So as a reader it is hard for me to ever get into a story if I it's a struggle to actually comprehend what's going on. The one thing that I did enjoy was the character Kurt'z but that was about the only thing that intersted me. I would definately only recommend this novel to a select few students. I am never reading a Joseph Conrad novel again. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mina Anderson | 12/7/2013

    " I listened to this book on audiotape, which is a terrible decision because the language in the book is gorgeous, so I kept missing the actual meaning of the text. But! It's short and good, mostly the language is incredibly textured :) "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ljbaker | 12/5/2013

    " The book fell down for me. The writing was so descriptive and convoluted, that I lost track of the storyline. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Susan | 11/30/2013

    " Have been fascinated by the Congo, the subject of Colonialism ever since. Worth rereading and reflecting on as you age and gain different life experiences. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Colin Roy | 11/29/2013

    " An engrossing, powerful journey that can be a little tricky to get into, but is worth the effort. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lauren Hyde | 11/29/2013

    " I have to admit this book was so difficult to get through. With that said, it's considered a masterpiece of early twentieth century literature, and it certainly is a must-read in understanding the European cultural reactions to colonized Africa. Conrad writes well, and his work leaves an impact on its reader long after the book has been closed. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mickey | 11/28/2013

    " Readers that don't give it five stars missed the point(s) of the book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sean Dhaliwal | 11/26/2013

    " I like the topic of this book, imperial exploitation. It is a dark and unflinching look at what men can do when away from proper society and given total freedom. It has it's slow parts, yes, but it's still a very engaging read. I can see the inspiration for Apocalypse Now very clearly. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dan | 11/25/2013

    " An extraordinary work that blurs the distinction between poetry and narrative fiction. Conrad weaves a tale that draws in the reader, evoking a mixture of fascination and fear, as his protagonist travels deep into the unknown... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Chantal Emond | 11/22/2013

    " Well, it's not 200 pages first of all. Only 78 pages. Good story. Dark, hence its name, but good :) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mike | 11/19/2013

    " I was assigned to read this book for my AP literature class. Although it was the most challenging book I've read I'm glad I did. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Judy | 11/18/2013

    " Read in college. A classic but not a favorite. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Vidur Kapur | 11/17/2013

    " I've read War and Peace, yet this book was orders of magnitude less interesting and seemed orders of magnitude more lengthy. A very detailed tale, but I really could not get myself to enjoy it or even take an interest in it. All I was reading was each word - individually. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Darko Bodnaruk | 11/15/2013

    " jezik je dober, ampak bi se zlagal, ce bi rekel, da sem dojel point "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Suhauna | 11/5/2013

    " Literally the most confusing book I've ever read... also it's like, super deep. It's also like a paradox and I'm a sucker for paradoxes. If I failed my in-class essay on it I'm going to be disappointed. Oh Conrad you scoundrel. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 James Rushton | 10/29/2013

    " A bit of a relic, a lot of the themes don't stand up today. You can't just run away to a uncharted territory in this day and age, but I still felt a lot of mysticism coming from Marlow's journey into the heart of the Congo. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lee | 10/29/2013

    " Chilling tale of madness written 100 years ago holds up today. A lot packed into such a short read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Christine | 10/25/2013

    " Too obscure for me. I got it and yet I feel I didn't really. The many parodies of this story do a FAR better job of telling it than Conrad does. Give me Apocolypse Now anytime over rereading these tortured 100 pages! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Colin Roy | 10/25/2013

    " An engrossing, powerful journey that can be a little tricky to get into, but is worth the effort. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jordan Goodeye | 10/20/2013

    " Despite being a small book, this is a bit of a challenging read; however it's highly rewarding for those who stick with it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Marsy Billinger | 10/20/2013

    " this book is the basis for so many modern stories. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andrew Price | 10/17/2013

    " A massively influential book obviously but not for me an enjoyable one. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Aphotic | 10/15/2013

    " Arrows, by Jove! We were being shot at! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Veronica | 10/14/2013

    " I didn't like this classic. It was dull. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Carmen | 9/28/2013

    " I could appreciate it for the great piece of literature it was, but I didn't really enjoy it. One of those books everyone should read and appreciate, but may not enjoy. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elaine Haby | 9/23/2013

    " Beautiful language . Pure poetry and amazing when you remember that English was not his first language. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Amy Naidoo | 9/18/2013

    " Dark and miserable. I really could not get into this book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gilberto Rodríguez | 9/17/2013

    " Amazing journey to the evilness and corruption of the men "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Toni Salas | 9/14/2013

    " Masterpiece. I've read it twice and can't wait to re-read it as soon as possible. Conrad is one of the best, five star literature. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Blair Beveridge | 9/7/2013

    " This book, and the famous movie based off of it we both very depressing experiences for me. I can recognize the angle, the purpose and the meanign of this book, but at the end of the day it depressed me "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Janeen | 9/5/2013

    " An elegant metaphor. Look for meaning in the corners and the shadows. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Stavros Pavlides | 8/26/2013

    " Meh... I actually found the 'story within a story' format a little unnecessary. It made Marlow's tale seem like more of a tall tale. The story itself was suitably dramatic but felt scattered. Perhaps i need to give it a closer reading "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Ryan | 8/24/2013

    " At 113 pages long, The Heart of Darkness was the longest, hardest, most painful 113 pages I've ever read in my entire life. "The Horror. The Horror," indeed. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Doris Pavonarius | 8/13/2013

    " I now remember why I hated reading required books in college. I don't have to finish them any more, but I did just to see if I could stand it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chuck Knight | 8/8/2013

    " Lovely work, with some very striking imagery. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Maman Samte | 7/29/2013

    " Read it in my English class for semester assignment, it is a classic. Language is rich and deep, but not something that I would have read in my own time for self purpose. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kelly Wortham Wick | 7/26/2013

    " Very interesting read,beware of the racial slurs. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Michael Van gorp | 7/14/2013

    " Definitely a classic that epitomizes the modernistic trend of writing at the turn of the century. Has some key elements missing, and the plot at the end of the story gets trampled on by long winded over-dramatic sentences. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Emma Lishness | 7/13/2013

    " While the content was incredibly interesting, I found Conrad's writing style to be less than engaging. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Paul Batt | 7/4/2013

    " Oh yeah, this is a must-read for expats. Try not to look too hard for parallels with Apacolypse Now, and it's , ahh, smooth sailing. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 djcb | 6/2/2013

    " I know the symbolism is dripping from each page, but I never really got into the story... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jean-sébastien Lévesque | 5/2/2013

    " The best book I ever read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Allison | 4/3/2013

    " An incredible book in many ways, Heart of Darkness is not a book for leisurley reading. It took me three weeks and a pile of annotation to get just ONE theme froms its' pages. I'm sure if I re-read it I could glean many other significant information, but that will have to wait. Just read it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Brittany Oldroyd | 3/31/2013

    " I'm not a huge fan, but at least I can say I've read it. The style was a little confusing and hard for me to focus on the story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Crcfozzie | 3/5/2013

    " Kind of terrifying to read while in the Peace Corps in central Africa... "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Andy | 3/2/2013

    " I've never actually finished this. It's the longest 84-page book I've ever seen. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mandie | 2/22/2013

    " need to re-read. (many times) to fully appreciate. Short. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Victor | 2/1/2013

    " Note; rating may have been affected by my love for two direct descendants; apocalypse now and the wrath of aguirre "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ragne | 1/22/2013

    " I'm not sure about this one. I loved the third part, but in part 1 and 2, very little happens. The language is beautiful, but I struggle to picture a sea-man speaking for so long in such a way. The story is dark and beautiful, but I still couldn't quite "get into" it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bill Brimijoin | 1/17/2013

    " One of those I was supposed to read in high school and college. Never got it done. Happy I still had my used bookstore copy. A tough read but an amazing one; well worth the effort required and a book best read with a little life experience under the belt. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anneirwinward | 1/11/2013

    " This is the book that prompted my switch of college major from English to Psychology. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 MichaÅ‚ | 12/21/2012

    " A mesmerising and piercing insight into downward spiral of a human mind. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Terrance Kutney | 12/9/2012

    " harder read, but interesting if you want to learn about the colonialism. I had fun watching Apocalypse Now after reading this. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kelly S. | 12/3/2012

    " Read this because Connor had to for AP 12. Excellent book. Deep.... dark.... but great. Novella. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 John Penn | 12/1/2012

    " One of my all time favorites! I've read it many times. Incidentally, my favorite movie was based on this novel: Apocalypse Now. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Emily Ellsworth | 11/30/2012

    " Some really compelling moments, and a few huh what?! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Mason Milne | 11/29/2012

    " I hated this book. It is to hard to follow. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Viktoria | 11/26/2012

    " I listened to the AudioBook version and I was so confused. It was also kinda boring. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Suzie | 11/21/2012

    " I don't recommend it. . . . . . "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kerry Beavers | 11/7/2012

    " I took a class in Conrad in college. I never understood the facination with this book when his others are so much better. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Morgan Colleen | 11/5/2012

    " Haunting Story about going deep in the jungle and never coming back out... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kathleen | 10/21/2012

    " This classic book is very intriguing and well-written. Kenneth Branagh's phenomenal narration made this one of the best audiobooks I have ever listened to (thus the five-star review). The book itself would probably get 4 stars, despite its unfortunate racist overtones. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gilberto Rodríguez | 10/20/2012

    " Amazing journey to the evilness and corruption of the men "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kazza | 10/17/2012

    " If you like well detailed, morally ambiguous journeys into the human mind, Heart of Darkness is for you. Genuinely, the writing is brilliant, and the multiple point of views through which it is written is fascinating. For me, Marlow's moral ramblings became monotonous . "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Katie Comfort | 10/7/2012

    " Blech! I think pop culture ruined this one for me before I even began. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kelly | 9/30/2012

    " Wanted it to be darker. I need a British lit nerd to talk about this with me. I was hoping for an African "Apocalypse Now." "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Paul Robbins | 9/24/2012

    " Whether I liked it or not, it has stayed with me a long time "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Adan Muñoz lozano | 8/27/2012

    " A great book, deep in the soul of human heart. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Claira Gildersleeve | 8/18/2012

    " Very thought provoking. Had a hard time getting over the way that Conrad writes but after that I really liked the book as a whole. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Valerie Linsinbigler | 7/25/2012

    " You have no idea how much I despised reading this book in English class. It was so intensely boring and I usually love classics. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dan Lacy | 7/17/2012

    " Brilliant. Conrad is showing the poisonous corrupting nature of unlimited power, even among, or most especially among, the most "high minded". A work rarely approached in its power. Mesmerizing. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Paul Batt | 7/17/2012

    " Oh yeah, this is a must-read for expats. Try not to look too hard for parallels with Apacolypse Now, and it's , ahh, smooth sailing. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Rachael Forden | 7/17/2012

    " Well written, interesting and dark. I don't know that I liked it enough to recommend it, but I did enjoy reading it myself. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Scottwood80 | 7/16/2012

    " One of the most difficult books I've ever read.. But so worth the journey. The basis for the movie Apocalypse Now.. And Joseph Conrad is one of the most intriguing authors of his time. Enjoy! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Crcfozzie | 7/15/2012

    " Kind of terrifying to read while in the Peace Corps in central Africa... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Emilian Kasemi | 7/13/2012

    " I know "Apocalypse Now" was inspired and adapted from this book so I'd like to read it. Even though some of my friends gave it bad ratings. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Gayle | 7/6/2012

    " Do not read this book when you have a 102 degree fever. It has haunted me since high school - having to finish this book while severely ill. No I don't think I would have enjoyed it even if I had been well but the fever combine with the dark and often gross imagery has haunted me ever since. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Valerie Linsinbigler | 7/6/2012

    " You have no idea how much I despised reading this book in English class. It was so intensely boring and I usually love classics. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anneirwinward | 7/5/2012

    " This is the book that prompted my switch of college major from English to Psychology. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Polytimi | 6/11/2012

    " "It was ok", with some extracts that were full of lyricism and very profound.I cannot say that I loved reading it,but I certainly loved some quotes very much, especially the ones about death! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lex | 6/6/2012

    " Profound, hypnotically written with metaphors and allegory (and looong descriptions) in abundance. It was probably the most difficult read of my life and I think a lot went past my head though. Here's one I definitely have to return to later. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jahn | 6/2/2012

    " I really didn't like while reading it, but once I was done and thought about it, I realized it was pretty good and I liked it. Not sure I'd read it again though "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Prakriti | 6/2/2012

    " At long last. The end was a rather damp squib, I didn't quite get it. But the prose throughout is fantastic, heavy and oppressive (that's how it's meant to be) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Duncan Whitehead | 5/14/2012

    " Kurtz....one of the best characters ever written, in my opinion, I love this book and it deserves it place among the classics. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anthony Meaney | 5/1/2012

    " Occasionally you have to read the classics. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Christian Webb | 4/21/2012

    " Maybe it's because I'm not used to the horrible narrative that Conrad uses, or maybe it's because I had to write an essay on this book - but I didn't enjoy the story of Marlow at all. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Kent | 4/19/2012

    " I struggled to understand the point, and that's because I missed some key insights along the way. This novel was too subtle for me. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dibakar Roy | 4/12/2012

    " Every time i read it i feel like ive crawled into something deep and meaningful but when im done i cant grasp it. Im going to read it for the forth time now. Apocalypse Now, which was based on this is probably my favourite movie ever. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lee | 4/10/2012

    " Chilling tale of madness written 100 years ago holds up today. A lot packed into such a short read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kate Krz | 4/2/2012

    " Joseph Conrad - a true artist!!! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Clydefroggie | 3/28/2012

    " The ending is drove me insane. It's not badly written, but after finishing the book I was in agony. I felt the writer injected a poison into my bloodstream and left me suffering in the open field. I can see why its a classic novel. I will re-read it in my deathbed and rate it 5 stars. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Adan Muñoz lozano | 3/23/2012

    " A great book, deep in the soul of human heart. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sophie Tallis | 3/16/2012

    " An extraordinary work of pure genius. The throbbing menace of the landscape Conrad takes you through is matched perfectly by the brooding inner dialogue of a character utterly lost with himself. A spiral into madness and the things that drive us. Wonderful! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joao De andrade | 3/15/2012

    " There comes a moment when what you believed your country was really comes tumbling down.... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kelly S. | 3/12/2012

    " Read this because Connor had to for AP 12. Excellent book. Deep.... dark.... but great. Novella. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jem Wilton | 3/6/2012

    " Cause of the Apocalypse Now link "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mark Spano | 3/4/2012

    " Mr. Kurtz is fascinating in his embodiment of evil. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dhruvi Chauhan | 3/3/2012

    " AP LIT. WOOT WOOT. really deep and profound book. 4/5 since despite the depth of this book, this guy's a misogynistic a-hole LOL. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Morgan Colleen | 3/3/2012

    " Haunting Story about going deep in the jungle and never coming back out... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Colin Roy | 2/14/2012

    " An engrossing, powerful journey that can be a little tricky to get into, but is worth the effort. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kelly Warren | 2/11/2012

    " Great story line, but the writing style did not hold my attention too well. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Peter | 1/16/2012

    " Loved it. I wish I could reread it and savour every bit of this masterpiece. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Merve | 1/14/2012

    " dark, dark and dark..mysterious, obscure but engrossing. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 William | 1/9/2012

    " Well, simply put, it could not live up the the high expectations caused my the abundant hype. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Riley | 12/28/2011

    " the best book i've ever read and i've read over 40 books. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Victoria | 12/14/2011

    " It's a boy's adventure story. Perhaps this book was so talked up to me, that when I read it, it didn't live up to my expectations. It's well written and a classic for a reason. But it didn't really speak to me, I didn't really relate to the characters. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Zoli | 12/9/2011

    " Now I have to watch Apocalypse Now again... "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Marie | 12/5/2011

    " This book contained Heart of Darkness and The Congo Diary. I preferred the Heart of Darkness over The Congo Diary which I found to be very confusing. Perhaps it was because it was not the type of diary I was thinking of. I would be curious to hear what others think. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jessica Goodwin | 12/1/2011

    " Overly dense. It seemed like the narrator never felt like he was getting his point across. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Allison | 11/29/2011

    " An incredible book in many ways, Heart of Darkness is not a book for leisurley reading. It took me three weeks and a pile of annotation to get just ONE theme froms its' pages. I'm sure if I re-read it I could glean many other significant information, but that will have to wait. Just read it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dane | 11/29/2011

    " Great American Novel! Apocalypse Now... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Devin D. Barrett | 9/30/2011

    " Albeit reluctantly - This book is no longer the bane of my existence. I might just have to give Apocalypse Now a chance... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bernie | 8/31/2011

    " Not an easy read but thankfully it was short. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Riley | 8/3/2011

    " the best book i've ever read and i've read over 40 books. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Rachael Forden | 8/1/2011

    " Well written, interesting and dark. I don't know that I liked it enough to recommend it, but I did enjoy reading it myself. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Clifford Massie | 7/29/2011

    " Another great classic and good vocabulary builder. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Alie | 7/27/2011

    " I give up. I hit the wall with this book a few weeks ago and now I can't get past a page at a time. The writing is so wordy that I can't actually tell what's happening. Hemmingway taught me that there's nothing to be gained by finishing books that you're not interested in. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Peter | 7/16/2011

    " Loved it. I wish I could reread it and savour every bit of this masterpiece. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anita | 7/9/2011

    " This tale of a crazy man living in a jungle is a classic. As usual I found myself often lost in the stream of consciousness prose, but having seen Apocalypse Now, I was able to stay focused on the plot. The language in its raw primal character was quite beautiful if not frightening and morbid. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Denise Flynn | 6/9/2011

    " I need to re-read this before I formulate a review as I'm not sure I would do the book justice at the moment. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dad | 5/22/2011

    " I read this as part of my Advanced Placement English class during my senior year at Roy High School.
    This book had a lot of symbolism. Everything there was meant to be "dark." I still remember it after 40 years. It kinda gave me a creepy feeling. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Mary | 5/22/2011

    " This book was a real challenge for me. Book group wanted to read a classic and someone picked this. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christopher | 5/21/2011

    " One of my favorite books due to the contemplative nature of the narrative and its dialogue concerning the human experience. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Tanya | 5/19/2011

    " Worst high school assignment ever... but maybe it was the teacher and my group rather than the book... "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Gretchen | 5/18/2011

    " So boring. I can see why people think it was amazing... but really, what a bore. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ctb | 5/16/2011

    " Achebe is wrong! This book exposes and condemns European racism and colonization, not condones it. It even, in 1898, takes a stab at sexism. Conrad was a genius. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Oskari | 5/15/2011

    " A simple novella plotwise. The language is powerful, scenery oppresive and the themes intellectually brutal. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Deepti | 5/12/2011

    " Brilliant, although you need multiple reads to uncover it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Steffi | 5/11/2011

    " Good start. By the end you get a bit drowned in the heavy 19th-century writing style. There are some good excerpts and thoughtful moral messages, if you can manage to pick them out from the rubble of words... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chris | 5/10/2011

    " the sentences! the sentences! The very end makes no sense to me, though. Think he screwed that up. I also don't see what was so great about Kurtz. Seems to me that might have been shown better. But the rest is beautifully written, sentence after sentence. "

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About the Author
Author Joseph Conrad

Joseph Conrad (Józef Teodor Konrad Nalecz Korzeniowski) (1857–1924) was born in Ukraine. Raised by an uncle after the death of his parents, he educated himself by reading widely in Polish and French. At age twenty-one he began a long career sailing the seas on French merchant vessels, after which he went to London and began writing, using the romance and adventure of his own life for his incomparable sea novels.

About the Narrator

Scott Brick, actor, narrator, and writer, attended UCLA and spent ten years in a traveling Shakespeare company. Passionate about the spoken word, he has narrated a wide variety of audiobooks, from thrillers and science fiction to classics and nonfiction. He has recorded more than eight hundred audiobooks and won over fifty AudioFile Earphones Awards and several of the prestigious Audie Awards. He was named a Golden Voice by AudioFile magazine and the Voice of Choice for 2016 by Booklist magazine.