Extended Audio Sample

Download Ghost Light: A Memoir Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Ghost Light: A Memoir Audiobook, by Frank Rich
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (201 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Frank Rich Narrator: Frank Rich Publisher: Phoenix Books Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: May 2009 ISBN:
Coming Soon! We're adding audiobooks daily and hope to make this one available for download very soon. Submit your vote below to let us know you really crave this title!
Vote this up! This audiobook has 0 votes

The celebrated New York Times drama critic and columnist Frank Rich shares an endearing memoir of a childhood transformed by the magic of Broadway.

There is a theater superstitions that if the emptied house is ever left completely dark, a ghost will take up residence. To prevent this, a single ghost light is left burning at center stage after the audience and all of the actors and musicians have gone home. Frank Rich's eloquent and moving boyhood memoir reveals how theater itself became a ghost light and a beacon of security for a child finding his way in a tumultuous world.

Struggling with his parents' divorce and the universal trial of childhood, Rich took refuge in the spectacle and emotion of the great musicals - South Pacific, Carousel, The Music Man -and eventually found a second home at Washington's National Theatre, where as a teen he was ticket-taker. The revered New York Times critic writes lovingly of how his favorite shows, songs, and actors became a lifeline, leading him out of a tumultuous household and propelling him towards the itinerant family of theater, whose romantic denizens welcomed him into the colorful fringes of Broadway during its last glamorous era. Download and start listening now!

BK_PNIX_000118

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 shawn stapleton | 2/16/2014

    " Well written book about growing up in the late 50's and early 60's. Stories about Broadway shows showed some similair interest as my step son is going to school for theater. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Natalie Sherling | 2/6/2014

    " I'm more of a fiction reader, but I picked up this book because it looked interesting. I was sucked and and devoured it. Fantastic look at what you will do to obtain what you love. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Pam Quinn | 1/24/2014

    " Memoir by Frank Rich, the theatre critic for the NY Times. What a life he lived. What a way to grow up. I am jealous, jealous! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ellen | 1/17/2014

    " Not my all time favorite book but a must for any musical theater buff! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Maria | 12/30/2013

    " --- a theater-obsessed boy, who uses musical theater to escape an unhappy home life, grows up to become the theater critic for the NY Times. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cynthia Gelper | 12/22/2013

    " Excellent memoir of a lonely childhood spent obsessing about the theatre "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michelle | 12/21/2013

    " If you have a love of the theater, grew up going to the theater, have a parent who adores the theater ... you will love this book. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Megan Reichelt | 12/16/2013

    " I got so angry at the abuse and inaction in this book that I had to stop reading it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Huling | 11/29/2013

    " Wonderful coming of age that highlights the golden age of Broadway. Full of a lot of heart and honesty. Really quite affecting. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Johanne | 10/27/2013

    " I agree with James Ellroy: a spellbinding coming of age tale". Unlike some memoirs by those with difficult childhoods, he is - while very honest - able also to credit the good parts. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amy Neal | 12/5/2012

    " Frank Rich's column for the NY Times in my opinion, is always right on the money. For an insight of who he is today, this memoir is a good start. He is a theater-aholic. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jean | 5/8/2012

    " A phenomenal memoir by one my favorite columnists. I probably like it even better because he signed my book for me. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Emily | 3/16/2012

    " If you grew up, as I did, singing along with Broadway show tunes from the '40s and '50s, you'll love this memoir "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cindy | 2/4/2012

    " This book was an interesting memoir about a childhood/young adulthood in DC and NY. I think I was expecting more that would've informed me about his current focus on our political system...but was interesting nonetheless "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marion | 12/12/2011

    " Great theater book along with his memoir. Easy read for a weekend. Would recommend for those that have an interest in theater & memoirs - well written. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ronni | 11/2/2011

    " This book is a MUST for any theater fan. Rich, the former theater critic of the NY TIMES, details how theater literally saved his life during a rather unhappy childhood. His excitement and gratitude to the practioners of the art form are palpable, and his writing is impeccable. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kennedy | 12/4/2010

    " Very cool autobiography, about the theater and its leading critic & champion, the great New York Times writer Frank Rich. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Huling | 8/11/2010

    " Wonderful coming of age that highlights the golden age of Broadway. Full of a lot of heart and honesty. Really quite affecting. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Natalie | 7/9/2010

    " I'm more of a fiction reader, but I picked up this book because it looked interesting. I was sucked and and devoured it. Fantastic look at what you will do to obtain what you love.
    "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Megan | 5/14/2010

    " I got so angry at the abuse and inaction in this book that I had to stop reading it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cindy | 11/8/2008

    " This book was an interesting memoir about a childhood/young adulthood in DC and NY. I think I was expecting more that would've informed me about his current focus on our political system...but was interesting nonetheless "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 shawn | 8/18/2008

    " Well written book about growing up in the late 50's and early 60's. Stories about Broadway shows showed some similair interest as my step son is going to school for theater. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kennedy | 5/18/2008

    " Very cool autobiography, about the theater and its leading critic & champion, the great New York Times writer Frank Rich. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ellen | 3/13/2008

    " Not my all time favorite book but a must for any musical theater buff! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amy | 2/27/2008

    " Frank Rich's column for the NY Times in my opinion, is always right on the money. For an insight of who he is today, this memoir is a good start. He is a theater-aholic. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Maria | 11/13/2007

    " --- a theater-obsessed boy, who uses musical theater to escape an unhappy home life, grows up to become the theater critic for the NY Times. "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author
Author Frank Rich

Frank Rich served from 1980 to 1993 as the chief drama critic for the New York Times, and is now an op-ed columnist at the paper, as well as senior writer for the New York Times Magazine. He lives in New York City