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Download Germs, Genes, & Civilization: How Epidemics Shaped Who We Are Today Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Germs, Genes, & Civilization: How Epidemics Shaped Who We Are Today (Unabridged) Audiobook, by David P. Clark
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (275 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: David P. Clark Narrator: Summer McStravick Publisher: Pearson Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 2011 ISBN:
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The stunning, hidden interconnections between microbes and humanity.

AD 452: Attila the Hun stands ready to sack Rome. No one can stop him - but he walks away. A miracle? No... dysentery. Microbes saved the Roman Empire. Nearly a millennium later, the microbes of the Black Death ended the Middle Ages, making possible the Renaissance, Western democracy, and the scientific revolution. Soon after, microbes ravaged the Americas, paving the way for their European conquest.

Again and again, microbes have shaped our health, our genetics, our history, our culture, our politics, even our religion and ethics. This book reveals much that scientists and cultural historians have learned about the pervasive interconnections between infectious microbes and humans. It also considers what our ongoing fundamental relationship with infectious microbes might mean for the future of the human species.

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ron | 2/15/2014

    " David Clark provides a quick, popular history of the interaction of germs on genes and civilization. He let slips his political stance on several occasions, but provides a decent introduction to the topic with many interesting readings listed in the back. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cindy | 2/6/2014

    " Although difficult to plow through at times, this is an extremely interesting read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Heather | 2/5/2014

    " Great book! Informative and an overall great read. While I enjoy books on diseases and history, this book is a book I would recommend to all! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Donna | 1/30/2014

    " This book had some interesting factoids but was very repetitive and extremely disorganized. It didn't break any new ground and the sections on AIDS and religion were rife with illogical conjectures. If I hadn't been reading it on a Kindle I would have thrown the book across the room. The first half or so I gave 3 stars, the last quarter 1 star. I'm averaging it out to a 2 but I would not recommend this book to anyone. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julie | 1/16/2014

    " Currently reading this book. I am only about halfway through but am finding it fascinating. Of course, the fact that I was a microbiology major has nothing to do with my interest level! The content is quite dry but the author draws very interesting conclusions about the impact of disease on all of human history. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rob | 1/16/2014

    " Really cool look at how genes and germs have shaped civilizations throughout history. Shows not only how germs and genetic mutations have been responsible for economies and wars and visa-versa. Great hypothesis that is backed up with science, proof, evidence, and analysis without being too dry. Very readable. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Michael | 1/6/2014

    " I confess I didn't finish this book. I may come back to it at some point after I've read every other book in the world that is more compelling and interesting which will be never. Not that Clark's book wasn't interesting-- it was. It's on my Kindle and always there to be read whenever I get around to it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 CK | 1/5/2014

    " Interesting book that highlights disease as a main impetus to most religious and economic change. Lots of facts and reasonable historic correlation. Repeats occasionally making the book longer, and less enjoyable. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jen | 1/5/2014

    " While I completely disagree with his philosophy (evolution and atheism), his historical interpretation on the effects of pandemics and the diseases that cause them was was very interesting. This was a really good read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nathan Shumate | 1/5/2014

    " A bit stiff and repetitive, but a good overview, especially for spec fic worldbuilders, of some of the dynamics regarding population density. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nancy Jones | 1/1/2014

    " Helpful book in understanding some of our greatest fears concerning epidemics. But there is much more interesting information included if you have any interest in science and people. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joy | 12/17/2013

    " Not a lot of new material here for someone interested in the subject, but a solid, fun-to-read book on the subject. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kelly Barfuss | 12/17/2013

    " VERY interesting book! Want to learn more. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Faye Bierbower | 12/15/2013

    " I read this because I was sick and reading a lot, and found it for free on my Kindle. It didn't add much to any of my prior studies on the subject, but was a diverting way to spend some couch-time. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Eden Steffey | 11/29/2013

    " Really interesting book. I learned a lot. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cara | 11/1/2013

    " Interesting thoughts and ideas, but I thought it would have worked better with more cohesive organization. I felt like it skipped around a lot, and interesting threads would trail off. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Dick Thomas | 10/21/2013

    " slow read. but interesting if you give it time "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lisa Taruschio | 9/8/2013

    " This book was not as interesting as I had hoped it would be. Informative, but rather like a survey course. I'd have liked more info on the actual social effects of the various epidemics aside from the numbers of how many died and what that meant. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Caryn | 8/20/2013

    " Interesting information albeit a bit dry in spots. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Michael Descy | 2/19/2013

    " I learned a few new things from this book. I did find it repetitive, however. I think it could have been edited better. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Katy Borluvie | 2/6/2013

    " Very interesting look at how disease and bacteria have had a positive as well as negative effect on human development. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Katie | 1/12/2013

    " Pretty good, not as good as Gun, Germs and Steel, but still a good book. Don't read if you're coming down with a cold or the flu, however. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mary | 12/24/2012

    " Interesting information in this nook about how epidemics shaped history. Only thing is, the book repeated much of the same information ad nauseum and the book did not flow well at all. I also would have liked to see citations in the chapters for reference. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jack | 6/29/2012

    " An interesting account of the way disease-causing micro-organisms have influenced the development of civilization as it exists today. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Charlie Dennis | 6/24/2012

    " It was okay but just okay "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 liirogue | 3/26/2012

    " Interesting, but as others have mentioned it can be very repetitive. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Shannon | 3/20/2012

    " Read up until the author got into the subject of homosexuality and how they are a public health hazard. That ended it for me. "

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