Extended Audio Sample

Download Frankenstein: or The Modern Prometheus Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Frankenstein: or The Modern Prometheus Audiobook, by Mary Shelley Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (925,986 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Mary Shelley Narrator: Anthony Heald, Stefan Rudnicki, Simon Templeman Publisher: Craig Black Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: March 2008 ISBN: 9781455190393
Regular Price: $16.95 Add to Cart
— or —
FlexPass™ Price: $12.95$5.95$5.95 for new members!
Add to Cart learn more )

This special unabridged, multivoiced production of Mary Shelley’s masterpiece of nineteenth-century Gothic horror is narrated by film and television star Anthony Heald, joined by Grammy winner Stefan Rudnicki and actor Simon Templeman, under the direction of award-winning audio producer Yuri Rasovsky.

Dr. Victor Frankenstein, an ambitious young scientist, is consumed by a fanatic desire to create a living being. He fashions an eight-foot creature and succeeds in animating him but, horrified by his visage, perceives his creation to be a monster and frightens him away. The monster, wandering in search of human companionship, is spurned and repulsed by all he approaches and learns to hate and to kill. He confronts his maker with a terrible choice: unless Frankenstein creates for him a mate, he will go on a rampage of destruction.

A subversive tale about the corrupt tendencies in humanity’s most “civilized” ambitions, this haunting thriller, the original science fiction novel, maintains its hold in the collective imagination centuries after its first publication.

Download and start listening now!

4722

Quotes & Awards

  • “It is a mistake to read Frankenstein as a modern novel of psychological realism…Where Dracula and other conventional Gothic works are fantasies, with clear links to fairly tales and legends, and even popular ballads, Frankenstein has the theoretical and cautionary tone of science fiction.”

    Joyce Carol Oates

  • “The quest of a solitary and ravaged consciousness first for consolation, then for revenge, and finally for a self-destruction that will be apocalyptic, that will bring down the creator with his creature.”

    Harold Bloom

  • “A vibrant rendition of a tragic story.”

    AudioFile

  • “A subtle and ironic prophecy that raises the question of who exactly is the real monster in this story.”

    Jesse Larsen, 500 Great Books by Women

Listener Opinions

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Maike Bruls | 2/16/2014

    " I was really looking forward to reading this book for my literature class. however, I was extremely dissapointed with the story and I found the book actually quite irritating at times. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mollie Trail | 2/16/2014

    " The were many parts I really disliked about this book. There were a couple parts I did like though. The first half was good, but when the monster tells his story to Doctor Frankenstein, everything went downhill. The monsters story was WAY TOO LONG. After that meeting, most of the rest of the book is mere rambling of depressing thoughts with some overly descriptive parts of traveling thrown in. Plus, Mary Shelley turned a genius of a man into a clueless one with absolutely no common sense. I'm being generous to the first half of the book by giving it a two star rating. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 cartercam | 2/14/2014

    " Oh, so many themes in this book! Lots of wretchedness too. It made me think about everything from which character deserved the most sympathy to adopting rescue animals. The whining did go on rather a long time, but I wasn't bothered by it. I liked the prose. And I liked finally reading the actual story. Modern mythology does the story much injustice! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Monica Martin | 2/14/2014

    " This book is a classic, which asks the frequent question of 'nature vs. nurture'. Many people like to blame society for the creature becoming a murderer, however in my opinion the major of the blame goes to Frankenstein himself! Blaming society is the easy way out, it answers the question blankly with an abstract criminal, leaving the punishment for the air and not for the real guilty party. Is Frankenstein cared for the creature, and not ran from him then, his child would have then grown to be nice and happy, this is shown then he looks after the family. Being rejected from them (his only source of love) then turns him into the monster. Frankenstein should have appreciated his creation and not of screamed and ran. This book is powerful and steaming with moral issues! One of my Favourites! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Vickie Richey | 2/5/2014

    " Compelling story. Listened to it on CDs while riding my bike. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Vanny | 2/3/2014

    " Just okay but it's so cool that this is the first sci-fi novel. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lissette Maldonado | 1/26/2014

    " it was amazing and sure the old english takes a while to get used to but other than that it's an amazing book with a Gothic and gory theme. it will capture you and not make you stop reading until you learn Victor's story and the Creature's story as well. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ana | 1/20/2014

    " Another classical that gives you the chance to explore both sides of science and moral. This book is definitely a breakthrough if what you are searching is to understand how far can science go before it's considered unethical. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kerry | 1/19/2014

    " One of the strangest books I've ever read but enjoyable because of that. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Christine Van zyl | 1/16/2014

    " Mind twisting in that it is not nearly the ghost story you would expect. Shows you the other side of the story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Linda Knowles | 12/18/2013

    " The book that started the Gothic Horror genre. Movies have yet to do this book justice. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cherrie | 11/19/2013

    " I assigned this book to my senior English class so I thought that I'd better read it again. I'm so glad for the assignment and the reread. It's full of great questions and so pertinent in today's push of scientific limits/boundaries. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Marissa | 11/2/2013

    " I'm honestly not sure how I feel about this book. I loved the way Mary Shelley writes.... her skill with words is phenomenal. I'm not sure how I feel about the story, however. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jenna Leigh | 10/21/2013

    " What can I say? It's a classic. Great to read and there is a lot of depth, although it can be a bit dry at times, as some books from this era are. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tommy | 8/28/2012

    " Liked it a lot more than in high school! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jessscard | 7/2/2012

    " Too much babble for me, might try to read it again one day "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andrew Sweatman | 4/13/2012

    " I read this at the same time as Dracula and I liked this one better "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 KR | 7/18/2011

    " Easily one of the best books of all time. The deeper meaning of the monster within us all is fascinating...great, great book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shams | 6/1/2011

    " One of my favourite novels. Frankenstein acts as a warning: The less you know, the happier you will be. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 James | 5/31/2011

    " This book made a considerable influence on me, moreso than any other book I've read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lindsay | 5/31/2011

    " A rather captivating read! I also learned something modern America seems to be ignorant of--Frankenstein is the doctor, not the monster! Honestly, Shelley's British writing is beautiful and, her mother is Mary Wollstonecraft--what's not to love!? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Suzanne | 5/31/2011

    " I read this in high school. I was leery of reading it because everyone knows that Frankenstein is supposed to be scary. This is not the case in Shelley's version. It was very enjoyable. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Amanda | 5/29/2011

    " A must read classic, and if you don't know the story of how Mary Shelley came to win a bet with her famous husband and Lord Byron by writing this book, make sure you look it up. It just adds to the greatness of this masterpiece. Shelley is a true original. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sally | 5/28/2011

    " Frankenstein is this kind of classic book that I'd love to have all over in my bookshelf. I've read it twice and I still got lots of excitement while reading it again. I highly recommend this to everyone in all ages, you won't feel regret. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joshua | 5/24/2011

    " When I first read this, I was a freshman in high school and had no desire to read this novel, but I am very glad I did. It is a wonderful novel that invites the reader to look at oneself and the choices that we take in our own lives that can come with undesirable cost. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alexander | 5/23/2011

    " not bad.
    i do enjoy gothic fiction, the way they're written is facinating.
    but i still felt marginally detatched from the characters and story.
    but i watched the 94' movie with Helena Bonham Carter and i was all set :D "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ann | 5/23/2011

    " One of my all time favorites! This is NOT a book about a monster. It is a book about humanity and what it is to be human. Beautifully written. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Melinda | 5/23/2011

    " I used to teach this book toy tenth graders It was great for discussion. And it was a good one for grabbing the boys which is hard to do. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Drucilla | 5/20/2011

    " Interesting to read the actual story of Frankenstein. It's always nice to read the original version of a story that has been done so many times. it gives you a fresh perpective on the new retellings. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Roman | 5/20/2011

    " interesting for scholars, reflecting the ills of the industrial society...
    not quite enjoyable as a book to read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Steven | 5/20/2011

    " I thought it was quite dry, the only times it became a page turner was when frankenstein was actually in the scene, and unfortunatly that was probably only an 1/8ish of the book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Morgan | 5/19/2011

    " I enjoyed the philosophical themes in this book. Definitely a thoughtful book, not nearly the horror the movies all become. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Alan | 5/18/2011

    " One of the worst written books in English but one of the great ideas in English literature. The handling of the creature within the narrative is particularly egregious. Read this as it is an important story in modern literature but also notice the nonsensical unfolding account of that creature. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 David | 5/18/2011

    " I read this book on a train bound for Scotland in 1995. It has a compelling moral: we create monsters by the way we treat or mistreat people. "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author
Author Mary Shelley

Mary Shelley (1797–1851), née Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin, was born in London, the second daughter of Mary Wollstonecraft, well known feminist, philosopher, educator, and writer, and William Godwin, famous English philosopher, novelist, and journalist. She was best known for her Gothic novel Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus, written when she was eighteen and published when she was twenty-one. She was married to the Romantic writer Percy Bysshe Shelley.

About the Narrators

Anthony Heald, an Audie Award–winning narrator, has earned Tony nominations and an Obie Award for his theater work; appeared in television’s Law & Order, The X-Files, Miami Vice, and Boston Public; and starred as Dr. Frederick Chilton in the 1991 Oscar-winning film The Silence of the Lambs. He lives in Ashland, Oregon, with his family.

Stefan Rudnicki first became involved with audiobooks in 1994. Now a Grammy-winning audiobook producer, he has worked on more than three thousand audiobooks as a narrator, writer, producer, or director. He has narrated more than three hundred audiobooks. A recipient of multiple AudioFile Earphones Awards, he was presented the coveted Audie Award for solo narration in 2005, 2007, and 2014, and was named one of AudioFile’s Golden Voices in 2012.

Simon Templeman is a British actor who frequently voices vampire characters in video games, most notably Kain from the Legacy of Kain video game series.