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Download Flesh and Blood So Cheap: The Triangle Fire and Its Legacy: The Triangle Fire and Its Legacy Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Flesh and Blood So Cheap: The Triangle Fire and Its Legacy: The Triangle Fire and Its Legacy Audiobook, by Albert Marrin Click for printable size audiobook cover
3.58 out of 53.58 out of 53.58 out of 53.58 out of 53.58 out of 5 3.58 (12 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Albert Marrin Narrator: John H. Mayer Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2012 ISBN: 9780449014752
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On March 25, 1911, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory in New York City burst into flames.  The factory was crowded.  The doors were locked to ensure workers stay inside.  One hundred forty-six people—mostly women—perished; it was one of the most lethal workplace fires in American history until September 11, 2001.

But the story of the fire is not the story of one accidental moment in time.  It is a story of immigration and hard work to make it in a new country, as Italians and Jews and others traveled to America to find a better life.  It is the story of poor working conditions and greedy bosses, as garment workers discovered the endless sacrifices required to make ends meet.  It is the story of unimaginable, but avoidable, disaster.  And it the story of the unquenchable pride and activism of fearless immigrants and women who stood up to business, got America on their side, and finally changed working conditions for our entire nation, initiating radical new laws we take for granted today.

With Flesh and Blood So Cheap, Albert Marrin has crafted a gripping, nuanced, and poignant account of one of America's defining tragedies. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • Published to coincide with the centennial anniversary of the 1911 fire that erupted in the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, this powerful chronicle examines the circumstances surrounding the disaster...Marrin's message that protecting human dignity is our shared responsibility is vitally resonant. Starred Review, Booklist, April 1, 2011:
    "Sure to spark discussion, this standout title concludes with source notes and suggested-reading lists that will lead students to further resources for research and debate."
  • Starred Review, School Library Journal, May 2011:
  • The writing is compelling and detailed, and the author effectively manages to bridge the gap between detached expository writing and emotionally charged content...this is a useful and thoughtful addition to any American history collection."
  • “The writing is compelling and detailed, and the author effectively manages to bridge the gap between detached expository writing and emotionally charged content…This is a useful and thoughtful addition to any American history collection.”

    School Library Journal (starred review)

  • “Sure to spark discussion, this standout title concludes with source notes and suggested-reading lists that will lead students to further resources for research and debate.”

    Booklist (starred review)

  • “Published to coincide with the centennial anniversary of the 1911 fire that erupted in the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, this powerful chronicle examines the circumstances surrounding the disaster…Marrin’s message that protecting human dignity is our shared responsibility is vitally resonant.”

    Publishers Weekly (starred review)

  • Starred Review, Publishers Weekly, January 17, 2011:
  • A 2011 National Book Award Finalist

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Clarissa | 2/19/2014

    " I must not have been paying very much attention in my US history classes because I felt like a lot of the material covered in this book was brand new to me. It was a fantastic overview (or introduction) of the pre-Unionized era of our country's history. I want to learn more. Great book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sam Luchsinger-Boice | 2/17/2014

    " A fairly good overview of the Triangle Fire for young readers that details the greed & corruption and work conditions of sweatshop workers and their bosses in the early 1900's. packs a lot of information for a YA book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anna Kim | 2/16/2014

    " This is a solid book that does a nice job of relating information about the Triangle Fire, which many people may not be aware of. With that said, it is clear that this book was written with younger students as the primary audience. The sentences are somewhat choppy and the details can be a bit unfocused, especially at the end. While I was able to figure out the point that the author was trying to make, I'm not sure that many students would be able to make the connections between gangsters, union corruption, international trade, and the need for further reform. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 readknitread | 1/28/2014

    " This book is really more about immigration life. I felt cheated with the cover. The actual fire/event is only a few pages towards the end. Be warned it has graphic pictures. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Edward Sullivan | 1/16/2014

    " Excellent history that places the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911 in the context of tenement life for new immigrants in early 20th century New York City and the rise of the labor movement. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Danie P. | 1/8/2014

    " Excellent book on the history of unions, child labor and immigrant labor in America. Written for older children and young adults. Could possibly be used in a book discussion? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Angela Rosio | 11/30/2013

    " An amazing story about the most deadly workplace fire pre 911. A look back at how government intervention and a few people standing up against the higher-ups, changed how the workplace operates, for the better. An amazing story about the strength and hard work of immigrants to this country. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 lesleymac | 8/15/2013

    " Good book for someone totally unfamiliar with the fire. The tone was a bit... smarmy? at times. More about unions and the historical setting than about the fire itself. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Krisi Bacher | 8/12/2013

    " Very informative, and written in a readable way. I was engaged in the story. If more non fiction was published like this - I think we could get more kids to read it. This is a great piece to go with a unit on Immigration and the Presidency of FDR. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bea | 4/6/2013

    " Excellent background for a time of immense, out of control growth in industry and our economy. The children and young women paid a terrible price. Excellent period photos. Useful background to such works of fiction as Uprising by Margaret Peterson Haddix. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dominique | 11/5/2012

    " A very superficial look at the Triangle Waist Factory fire and its impact on workers' rights. I guess I already knew most of the material in this book, so I didn't find it super enlightening, although I guess if you don't even know what the Triangle Fire is, you might. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tracey | 9/1/2012

    " teen nonfiction; history: triangle shirtwaist fire. Appears to be well-written, providing thorough background on immigration, living and working conditions, etc. "

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About the Author

Albert Marrin is the author of numerous nonfiction books for young readers, including the National Book Award finalist Flesh and Blood So Cheap: The Triangle Fire and Its Legacy as well as A Volcano beneath the Snow: John Brown’s War against Slavery, and Black Gold: The Story of Oil in Our Lives. His many honors include the Washington Post Childrens’ Book Guild Lifetime Achievement Award, the James Madison Book Award for Lifetime Achievement, and the 2008 National Endowment for the Humanities Medal.

About the Narrator

John H. Mayer is a writer, actor, and audiobook narrator. In 1973, he cowrote Radio Rocket Boy, an award-winning short film. He also has narrated dozens of audiobooks, including American Lion and The Wolf Tree, among many others.