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Download Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Edwin Abbott
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (16,734 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Edwin Abbott Narrator: Alan Munro Publisher: Trout Lake Media Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: April 2012 ISBN:
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Abbott used the fictional two-dimensional world of Flatland to offer pointed observations on the social hierarchy of Victorian culture. However, the novella's more enduring contribution is its examination of dimensions, for which the novella is still popular amongst mathematics, physics, and computer science students. Several films have been made from the story, including a feature film in 2007 called Flatland. Other efforts have been short or experimental films, including one narrated by Dudley Moore and a short film with Martin Sheen titled Flatland: The Movie.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dean | 1/31/2014

    " Fantastic book to expand how you think of dimensions. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kienie | 1/31/2014

    " I've decided that I don't like satire very much. Either I don't understand what the author is making fun of, or I think their approach is stupid. In this case I didn't really like how the story was told, as opposed to the idea itself. The main character is partially to blame. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 John Russell | 1/25/2014

    " A fun read. One of the cases where the story behind the book may be better than the one within it. Anyone with an interest in both physics and literature ought to enjoy this. I can think of few other examples where the two so closely meet. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Logophile | 1/16/2014

    " An exhortation to use one's imagination. Though the language is charmingly old-fashioned and the allegory of Victorian England somewhat dated, Abbott still inveigled me to imagine the "extra-Cube" of hyperspace. Like the poor square, I have difficulty visualizing where to put the seventh and eighth cubes that would form the "sides" of that extra-Cube, but it's been fun to try! Abbott's vision of a "modest" humanity that is more enlightened than our present one is also touching. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Billie Pritchett | 1/13/2014

    " In Edwin Abbott Abbott's Flatland, a square who lives in a two dimensional world called Flatland is visited by a sphere and taught the Gospel of Three Dimensions. The premise is cute, but I did not enjoy the story very much. For approximately one third of the book, Abbott describes the features of Flatland, for instance, the ways in which men and women are different (among other differences, women are lines and not any other shape and men come in various different shapes) and the ways in which the different classes recognize one another (the classes being divided by shape, of course). The book could have benefited from minimal description like the one just provided and not a detailed account. This could have been a very good short story as opposed to a novella/novel. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Riley | 1/13/2014

    " This book is a classic written from the perspective of a square. It is very interesting, because it talks about how a society in two dimensions differs from our normal society, and how their social system works. This book also dives into some aspects of going into a one dimensional world, and even a three dimensional world.I thought that this book was very well though up and creative. This book also made me think a lot about perspective in other dimensions, and how life would differ living in them. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Vasil Kolev | 1/13/2014

    " The first part can bring you nightmares with the totalitarian ideas. The rest is fun, a simple exercise in mathematics and geometry, probably good for children :) "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Will Brown | 1/7/2014

    " Really didn't live up to expectations; if you have less of a mathematical background the geometry might be interesting. The sexism was hard to get through. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Najd | 1/1/2014

    " An essay for those of us who appreciate and understand math. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Daniel | 11/27/2013

    " An interesting concept. Abbott explains the nature of a two-dimensional world while satirising victiorian life in England. If you can get over the heavily used victorian language, it is quite a good book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lemunisicate | 8/27/2013

    " A very unique approach to dimensional fictions. (which can actually be considered as a non-fic) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dawn | 8/24/2013

    " I loved how this book helped me better understand the fourth dimension. I found it very interesting. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Heather | 7/15/2013

    " 70-some pages that changed my whole outlook on the world. Truly a geometry book, but also a social commentary with decided religious questions and overtones. It made me think and has made me continue to think for months afterward. It is going on my favorite-books-of-all-time list. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jessi | 5/1/2013

    " I really enjoyed this, even with the mathematical concepts that were used (mostly basic geometry, so I could follow along). It's a really poignant commentary not just on social hierarchy and status, but also on our perception of the world around us. Hard to believe it was written in the late 1800s. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alexis Neal | 2/13/2013

    " Such a great book! So short, and such an easy read, but so much food for thought. Edwin Abbott gets major props for packing such profound content into such a tiny volume. Definitely worth reading. Multiple times. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jodie | 12/22/2012

    " Flatland literally changed the way I think about the world. A must read. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Johara | 12/16/2012

    " This is a book? What I read was an impossibly tedious math essay starring the world's most pretentious Square. And by pretentious I really do mean pretentious. The Square is horrid. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jaakko | 12/11/2012

    " This would have been great ten years ago. The worlds with different numbers of dimensions are pretty amazing if you consider when the book was written. If you already have had to work think about dimensionality the book does not offer much. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sharon Epperson | 7/21/2012

    " instructive and mildly entertaining. Introdution to geometry in a fictional setting. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Eliza Nalen | 6/18/2012

    " I had to give it four stars because of the originality I thought the book had. It explained the concept in depth, but I thought it was bland. I never finished the book even though I only had two or three chapters left because I lost interest. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Clara | 5/22/2012

    " The rating owes itself entirely to the concept, since the execution is nothing but dull. Would've made a fun theoretical essay, but as fiction it doesn't measure up. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Troy | 5/4/2012

    " Pretty cool concept for a story, although not super exciting. It was well written and offers a unique perspective on dimensions and geometry. Helps the reader to understand the reasoning behind higher dimensions of space possibly being a reality. "

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