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Download Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions Audiobook, by Edwin A. Abbott Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (16,793 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Edwin A. Abbott Narrator: Patrick Frederic Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2001 ISBN: 9780739300701
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"Your world has not just four dimensions, but five, fifty, a million, or even an infinity of them!" - A. Square

For more than 100 years, Edwin Abbott's mathematical adventure has charmed and fascinated. Set in a world on one plane, Flatland takes listeners on a strange and wonderful journey. This timeless fantasy tells the story of A. Square, a character who lives in a completely flat world where all the inhabitants are geometric shapes and think their world of length and width is the only world that exists. When Square is whisked away to the Land of Three Dimensions, he shakes up his fellow two-dimensional beings with his notion of a dimension beyond their own.

One of the rare novels about math and philosophy with almost universal appeal, Flatland is simultaneously a brilliant parody of Victorian society and a fictional guide to the concepts of relativity and the multiple dimensions of space.

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ferris | 2/16/2014

    " Audiobook........listening to this with Sally while we stitch on the porch at Douglas lake.....I get it that this story of a two dimensional world is a metaphor for the superficiality and the divisiveness of the social structure of our three dimensional world. Did not like it at all. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Matt Quail | 2/15/2014

    " Really disappointed. The way it explored multi-dimensional ideas was okay, but the weird misogyny was too much. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rocío | 2/12/2014

    " When I have kids, I will be reading this to them. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Norman Cook | 2/9/2014

    " This would be an excellent book for a teenager curious about geometry, as it presents the concepts of spatial dimensions in an entertaining and easily understandable manner. However, be warned that some of the ideas are quaintly old fashioned, such as some not so subtle sexism. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Scott Kleinpeter | 1/21/2014

    " What did the triangle say to the sphere? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Garrett Mccutcheon | 1/20/2014

    " The core story of Flatland is certainly starting to show signs of its age, but Ian Stewart does a phenomenal job of reviving the relevance of Flatland and it's inhabitants. Stewart does an excellent job of providing both historical context as well as discussing how Abbott's ideas foreshadowed, predicted, or influenced modern mathematical developments. The mathematics and analogy Abbott and Stewart use are equally useful to the mathematically inept and the mathematically adept. Entertaining and educational. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hardus | 1/9/2014

    " A brilliant escape from this world in a way that no other book did before Flatland or has since done with originality. Anyone vaguely interested in the possibilities of other dimensions should not even think twice. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Renee | 1/3/2014

    " Very interesting world creation, with a meticulously described 2-D world. Along with all of the fantastic geometry, also some great satire of classes and divisions and pushing outside the box of acceptable society. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Thomas Kinsfather | 12/30/2013

    " Fun with physics. A real brain stretcher. I'm amazed this was written in 1880. Brilliant! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ana | 12/20/2013

    " 3.5, actually. Review to come! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura | 12/16/2013

    " Really fun math book, especially how the author helped me better understand different dimensions. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jillian | 12/8/2013

    " I don't know a good way to describe this book. From the point of view of the 2D characters, 3D cannot exist. Once you are into it, it's very easy to start wondering what dimension exists outside of us. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Paul Coogan | 11/24/2013

    " Rather simplistic and only somewhat imaginative. It was possibly ground breaking in it's time. Very sexist as well, even considering the times. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Beckie | 6/29/2013

    " Interesting - not one that I would have picked on my own but made me think. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sharon Epperson | 6/7/2013

    " instructive and mildly entertaining. Introdution to geometry in a fictional setting. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Andy Bird | 5/13/2013

    " Not the best book, only just makes a 3. I read this because it was mentioned on the great TV series Big Bang. I found it mildly interesting but there was far too much geometry explanation and not enough story. Would not recommend. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ben Burnett | 3/29/2013

    " ok book, good description of dimensions, and how "people" from different dimensions may act and perceive the universe, but kinda dry. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julia Hilton | 12/16/2012

    " Other than the reflection of cultural biases against women during the author's time, I really liked this book. It was an interesting exploration of perceptions and societies. Short, easy to read, and still thought-provoking. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Paul Ivanov | 11/15/2012

    " A delightful and clever quick read - twists and stretches your mind in a playful manner. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ivan | 8/6/2012

    " In a word: mindblowing. When reading it keep in mind this book has been written in the 1880, as such many theories weren't invented yet. If you can follow the reading (which I admit, in order to do so you must love math) and impersonate "the circle", this book will really, really blow your mind. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mutasem Aldmour | 4/20/2012

    " possibly the most boring piece of literature I have ever read. I used it to bore me to sleep for more than a month. there were interesting ideas there. It was all fresh and different. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dane Peterson | 11/8/2011

    " Fun to read with a simple (yet compelling) argument regarding the possibility of other dimensions. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Heather | 10/5/2011

    " 70-some pages that changed my whole outlook on the world. Truly a geometry book, but also a social commentary with decided religious questions and overtones. It made me think and has made me continue to think for months afterward. It is going on my favorite-books-of-all-time list. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Emilie | 8/29/2011

    " This book is like nothing I have ever read before. It is so wonderfully odd, and every single person should read this! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jeri | 5/7/2011

    " Very hard to read in some places. . . but it had some interesting analogies "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kathan | 5/6/2011

    " Two dimensional worlds, victorian culture, and geometry. Highly recommended for anyone that wants an introduction into perceiving dimensions. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Molly | 5/2/2011

    " Such affection for this book. Read it! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carina | 4/26/2011

    " watching big bang made me remember this book! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jodie | 4/26/2011

    " Flatland literally changed the way I think about the world. A must read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Gabriel | 4/23/2011

    " As much as I want to recommend a metaphorical/fictional presentation of mathematical / geometric ways of thinking, I’m sorry to say I found this book to be severely overrated. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nuno J. | 4/14/2011

    " A book which explains you how a four-dimension space can be as natural as the three-dimension spaces or two-dimension spaces we are used to (at least in high school mathematics). "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lillian | 4/12/2011

    " Best read aloud. The satire is much more obvious that way, and the language simply fun. A good book for thinking about mathematics and one's place in the universe. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Stephen | 4/7/2011

    " Not exactly fantastic prose, but very mind-expanding. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sarah | 4/6/2011

    " I read this book for my English class. While there were parts of it that were interesting, this book just couldn't hold my attention. It actually made me fall asleep once. It got marginally better in the second half, but if you can avoid reading this book, then I would, if I were you. "

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About the Author
Author Edwin A. Abbott

Edwin A. Abbott (1838–1926) has been ranked as one of the leading scholars and theologians of the Victorian era. He received highest honors in mathematics, classics, and theology at St. John’s College, Cambridge, and in 1862 began a brilliant career, during which he served as schoolmaster of some of England’s outstanding schools. At the same time he distinguished himself as a scholar, and in 1889 he retired to his studies.

About the Narrator

Patrick Frederic is an American actor whose film and television credits include The Big Easy, 200 Cigarettes, and Law & Order, among others.