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Download Fire and Rain: The Beatles, Simon and Garfunkel, James Taylor, CSNY and the Lost - Story of 1970 Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Fire and Rain: The Beatles, Simon and Garfunkel, James Taylor, CSNY and the Lost  - Story of 1970 Audiobook, by David Browne Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (704 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: David Browne Narrator: Sean Runnette Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: July 2011 ISBN: 9781452673714
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January 1970: the Beatles assemble one more time to put the finishing touches on Let It Be; Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young are wrapping up Dejà Vu; Simon and Garfunkel are unveiling Bridge Over Troubled Water; James Taylor is an upstart singer-songwriter who's just completed Sweet Baby James. Over the course of the next twelve months, their lives-and the world around them-will change irrevocably. Fire and Rain tells the story of four iconic albums of 1970 and the lives, times, and constantly intertwining personal ties of the remarkable artists who made them. Acclaimed journalist David Browne sets these stories against an increasingly chaotic backdrop of events that sent the world spinning throughout that tumultuous year: Kent State, the Apollo 13 debacle, ongoing bombings by radical left-wing groups, the diffusion of the antiwar movement, and much more. Featuring candid interviews with more than one hundred luminaries, including some of the artists themselves, Browne's vivid narrative tells the incredible story of how-over the course of twelve turbulent months-the '60s effectively ended and the '70s began. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • Browne's engrossing account of this fertile but volatile period sets the standard by which comprehensive musical histories should be judged. BookPage
  • “This juicy, fascinating read transports you back to a turbulent year…Browne artfully describes the creation of these classic songs in a way that makes them seem brand-new.”

    Parade

  • “[Browne’s] attention to detail lends this compelling book a depth and richness rarely found in rock biography.”

    Financial Times

  • “Absorbing…Browne avoids sentimentality and nostalgia, aiming instead at a fresh look at the bands and their milieu. Some of the period details are almost astonishingly apt.”

    Boston Globe

  • “Fascinating doesn’t even come close as we get a never before seen glimpse of the time leading up to Paul McCartney’s announcement that he was leaving the Beatles and the intertwining, almost incestuous connections between all four of these artists, not to mention the tremendous cultural tremors going through the body politic as a whole and how this informed their music.”

    Huffington Post

  • “Intriguing new book…Fire and Rain works as a history lesson but is foremost a fast-paced music fan’s appreciation of the brilliance of that era’s artists.”

    Miami Herald

  • “A fascinating look at an era when an artist’s reputation was built not on social media sites, but on the music itself.”

    Publishers Weekly

  • Browne engagingly illuminates many overlooked stories that may not be familiar to even dedicated rock enthusiasts. Highly recommended.”

    Library Journal

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lori | 2/15/2014

    " I liked this book for the details that I didn't already know - that was fun. But I'm not a fan of the writing style. It reminded me of a college term paper - lots of properly cited facts with glimpses of creativity. The flow between musical happenings and historical events just didn't gel for me, and I think might be the sequence of the chapters...not sure. In any event it was an ok read, but not as good as many others that cover those great pop/rock/folk music years. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nancy | 2/4/2014

    " I very much enjoyed this book. I give it 5 stars for the people who love this music and were young when it first came out, and four stars for those who just like the music. I was a freshman/sophomore in 1970, and so many of these albums were among the first I bought and played over and over again on the stereo, staring into the album covers. The book probably doesn't add much new to what we know about these groups but I thoroughly enjoyed it. I played After the Gold Rush and Harvest this afternoon, had a Simon and Garfunkle fest last Sunday, and it's James Taylor's turn tomorrow..... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cwelshhans | 1/25/2014

    " The subjects are among my most favorite groups/singers ever. But because there are so many subjects, it's difficult to get in deep with any of them, although CSNY comes across as the most interesting by far. There also was little by way of a unifying theme of what these groups went through or what they meant. So the book was worth it if you like the groups, but it feels like a series of magazine articles and not a comprehensive book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 PM | 1/4/2014

    " Meh. Some interesting writing about James Taylor but nothing new on The Beatles, and frankly, CSNY and S&G don't belong in this book. Browne should have focused on a few up and coming bands who went on to define the hard rock music of the 1970s (Led Zeppelin comes to mind) providing contrast to Taylor and the slew of "folk rockers" to follow like Jim Croce, Dan Fogelberg, etc. It wasn't just the rise of singer/songwriter pablum that made 1970 a turning point in music. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Anne | 12/25/2013

    " There was more than I wanted to know about the publishing, recording and touring side of these bands and not enough about the performers personally. I was sorry to learn that there were so many quarrels and disagreements among the groups that I thought must have taken turns hanging the moon and who created the music which played throughout and still plays through my days. Actually, I wish I hadn't read it and in my imagination they all loved each other, loved the music they wrote, and supported the efforts of the other people they worked with. Do I really have to know what the reality is? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Betsy | 12/20/2013

    " Definitely took me back to my lost youth - I loved all of these performers and reading this history of their tumultuous year (1970) was fun and interesting. At times the writer perhaps gave music a little too much significance in the overall scheme of things but generally I liked how he gave the music historical context by showing what other stuff was going on in the world (the Vietnam War,youth power, youth rebellion, college campus upheaval, sex, drugs and rock n'roll, Nixon)and how it influenced the songs these performers wrote. It's also full of good People-Magazine style gossipy tidbits about internal divisions within the bands (Stephen Stills vs. Neil Young, David Crosby and Graham Nash; Paul vs. john and george; art vs. paul; James vs. James); the performer's strange quirks (Art Garfunkel loved to hitchhike and did so even at the height of his fame, once even hitching to perform at a concert while Paul drove past him in a limo); and how these people overlapped (James Taylor's first label was the Beatles' Apple Records; Simon and Lennon hung out; Stills and Beatles hung out; Graham Nash and Stephen Stills fought over Joni Mitchell who eventually ended up with James Taylor; and on and on.) I found myself humming so many songs, amazed that the lyrics came back to me so effortlessly. Maybe these guys were THAT significant! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Alissa | 12/11/2013

    " It's sort of all over the place in its telling. But the fun facts alone are worth reading it; " holy host of others standing round me"... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ang | 12/10/2013

    " If this is your music, this is your book. Excellent. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John Kaess | 12/5/2013

    " Excellent for any lovers of 1970 Rock. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Debra | 9/20/2013

    " Paul Simon was a pain, CSNY jockeyed for position in the group, egos abounded, and 1970 was a good year for popular music. I remember! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dominick | 3/16/2013

    " I liked it, found out much mor about James Taylor tha I ever knew previously. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Nikki | 10/17/2012

    " Fascinating subject, but boring book. Couldn't make myself finish it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Chris | 9/19/2012

    " Very interesting to read about 3 of my favorite musical acts and the times surrounding them. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Stormy | 8/30/2012

    " A great read. This is the year I graduated from high school. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cindy S. | 7/4/2012

    " Loved this quick read and learning of all the little background tidbits surrounding classics like "Bridge Over Troubled Water", "Suite Judy Blue Eyes" and "Fire and Rain"...it evoked memories of a more innocent time in my life when music was almost everything. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kyria | 2/29/2012

    " A big year in the life of music. Certainly an interesting read, but I realize why I usually prefer fiction. I found myself skimming a lot, but did enjoy it and learned a lot about the musicians that were focused on in this book. It was definitely a year of major transitions for all of them. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Patricia Geller | 1/20/2012

    " Listen on tape. Story of a time - he captures it well but for the audio version, would have been sweet to include the music. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Diana | 8/3/2011

    " This account of important rock and roll events in 1970 was a fun and nostalgic read. Iwho would how've thought that what these four groups were doing in 1970 could be analyzed as a history of the times. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Joe | 7/18/2011

    " Way too much detail and way too little narrative energy make this a tedious encyclopedia rather than an enjoyable read. Some of the most engaging artists of the decade become utterly boring in the hands of this writer. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Stormy | 7/13/2011

    " A great read. This is the year I graduated from high school. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jennifer | 6/26/2011

    " Who knew 1970 was such a pivotal year in music? The Beatles and Simon & Garfunkel split up while James Taylor's star ascended. CSN&Y were on again, off again. An amazing chronicle of a significant year; all it needs is to come with a soundtrack! "

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About the Author

David Browne is a contributing editor at Rolling Stone and the author of Dream Brother, Amped, Goodbye 20th Century, Fire and Rain, and So Many Roads. He also contributes to the New York Times, New Republic, Spin, NPR, and other outlets.

About the Narrator

Sean Runnette, an Earphones Award–winning narrator, has also directed and produced more than two hundred audiobooks, including several Audie Award winners. He is a member of the American Repertory Theater company and has toured the United States and internationally with ART and Mabou Mines. His television and film appearances include Two If by Sea, Cop Land, Sex and the City, Law & Order, the award-winning film Easter, and numerous commercials.