Farewell to Manzanar Audiobook, by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston Play Audiobook Sample

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Author: James D. Houston, Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston Narrator: Jennifer Ikeda Publisher: HMH Young Readers Audio Audio Length: Release Date: September 2019 Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download ISBN: 9780358296980

Publisher Description

During World War II a community called Manzanar was hastily created in the high mountain desert country of California, east of the Sierras. Its purpose was to house thousands of Japanese American internees. One of the first families to arrive was the Wakatsukis, who were ordered to leave their fishing business in Long Beach and take with them only the belongings they could carry. For Jeanne Wakatsuki, a seven-year-old child, Manzanar became a way of life in which she struggled and adapted, observed and grew. For her father it was essentially the end of his life.

At age thirty-seven, Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston recalls life at Manzanar through the eyes of the child she was. She tells of her fear, confusion, and bewilderment as well as the dignity and great resourcefulness of people in oppressive and demeaning circumstances. Written with her husband, Jeanne delivers a powerful first-person account that reveals her search for the meaning of Manzanar.

Farewell to Manzanar has become a staple of curriculum in schools and on campuses across the country. Last year the San Francisco Chronicle named it one of the twentieth century’s 100 best nonfiction books from west of the Rockies.

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Quotes

  • "A poignant memoir from a Japanese American. . . . Told without bitterness, her story reflects the triumph of the human spirit during an extraordinary episode in American history."—Library Journal "[Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston] describes vividly the life in the camp and the humiliations suffered by the detainees... A sober and moving personal account."—Publishers Weekly

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Customer Reviews

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  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " Whether it's redundant or not, people need to be aware of their history. "

    - Sabrina, 2/18/2014
  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5

    " The reason for the three stars is because it is mostly descriptive, and thus an excellent research book, when doing "empirical" research on the evacuation and internment of Japanese-Americans during WW II. However, I was expecting more emotions, and what the author was feeling emotionally, or I wanted the author to get into the minds of her parents and their thoughts. It is an important book, because it was one of, if not the first, book to talk about the internment. "

    - Steven, 2/16/2014
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " I'm reading this for school. "

    - Ilona, 2/11/2014
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " This book is a must read for all school kids; probably at middle school age. Story of a girl whose family were taken to the internment camps for Japanese Americans during WWII. What this country did breaks my heart and it is (sadly) not taught in schools. Why is it that we can't admit that we were cruel to the Japanese Americans -- or, for that matter, that we raped, pillaged & murdered thousands of Native Americans? I thought this book was very good, and it's written for middle school students. "

    - Tracey, 2/9/2014
  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5

    " reading this for school "

    - Jasmine, 2/7/2014
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " I give it 4 stars for the content and 3 stars for writing/editing. I wish Jeanne had not jumped around so much in her story. I enjoyed the book and feel I learned a lot from it. "

    - Angela, 1/24/2014
  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5

    " Because I had a specific amount of time to read this book I didn't get to read it the same way I would when I read for fun. I didn't like this book that much. It was a touching story and it gave me some perspective of what had happened in Pearl Harbor and the Japanese sent there but at times it was confusing and I didn't understand it. I think Houston explained more about how she transitioned from being a student at school to a woman with an American husband and children it would have made more sense. Overall it was ok but by far it wasn't a favorite book of mine or the best that I've read. "

    - Tess, 1/22/2014
  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5

    " It was okay...kind of a different perspective compared to the last japanese internment book I read. I was expecting a very easy reading level, like Journey to Topaz, but it was more complicated. "

    - Chloe, 1/18/2014
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " Farewell To Manzanar....A brilliant memoir of a eleven year-old girl's experience interned in a concentration camp. The events she remembered...the way she remembered....that was just so amazing. This is not exactly a spoiler, but for those of you who have read it, my favorite scene was the one where Jeanne's mother smashes the dishes. This scene was so lovely. The mental state that her mother went into to smash the dishes, all of that insult, that was so amazing. Amazing writing. "

    - Amelie, 1/16/2014
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " I recommend this book is full of history. the real story of many Japanese people and how they were treatened by the American Goverment. "

    - Lopez, 1/14/2014
  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " I loved it but my aunt wrote it and it's fascinating to read a book about your family's history "

    - Penni, 1/11/2014
  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5

    " This book was okay, I read it for school. "

    - cassie, 1/10/2014
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " This book is a true story from the life of the author who lived through the Japanese American internment. The book is short but detailed and makes you sad all over again. The one thing that bugged me was that it was not always historically accurate. "

    - Tiffany, 1/8/2014
  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5

    " IF you like books about prejudice, this book is for you. "

    - Ericâ–², 1/5/2014
  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5

    " This was an enjoyable read for me, particularly since I vistied Manzanar a few years ago and studied it during my California History class a few semesters before my visit. "

    - Dawn, 12/21/2013
  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5

    " This book read fast, was very interesting. "

    - Rhonda, 12/11/2013
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " Use with Japanese-American Internment Unit "

    - Robin, 11/1/2013
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " This was a chilling recollection of the treatment of the Japanese during ww2 in our country. it is a sad piece of American history that we should learn from and not be forgotten. "

    - Sarah, 10/12/2013
  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5

    " Forced to read this in 8th grade. I don't think anything I read in 8th grade is going to get more than 2-3 stars. And I'm sorry for that. "

    - Krishna, 10/3/2013
  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " This is for my summer reading. I HAVEN'T completed any of it yet, but I will as soon as I get all three of my books! "

    - Imani, 9/4/2013
  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " This is my son's summer reading book. This is a sad memoir of an ugly time in America's history. A coming-of-age account of a young girl's formative years spent in Manzanar, a Japanese internment camp. "

    - Elise, 8/2/2013
  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5

    " I prefer Julie Otsuka's "When the Emperor was Divine" to this. But it's straightforwardly told. "

    - Marcos, 7/16/2013
  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5

    " I was a little let down. I was expecting to learn more about the camps, but instead learned more about the author. I didn't feel like the story flowed very well and was not looking forward to reading more at anytime. "

    - Jason, 6/7/2013
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " Really enjoyed this book. While I already knew the history of the internment of the Japanese during WWII, this book showed me what it was like from the inside. Recommended. "

    - Todd, 4/28/2013
  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5

    " A must read for all Americans. "

    - Kris, 4/3/2013
  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5

    " A very important book to help us understand a period of time during WWII that we as Americans can not be too proud of. "

    - Teve, 3/29/2013
  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5

    " I fell asleep multiple times... "

    - Tahnee, 2/4/2013

About the Author

Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston is an American writer. Her writings are mostly focused on the ethnic diversity of the United States. She is best known for her autobiographical novel Farewell to Manzanar which details her own experiences as a Japanese American in World War II internment camps. She lives with her husband, James D. Houston, in Santa Cruz, California.

About the Narrator

Jennifer Ikeda has been narrating audiobooks since 2002. Among her readings are When My Name Was Keoko by Linda Sue Park; Just Listen by Sarah Dessen; and After the Wreck, I Picked Myself Up, Spread My Wings, and Flew Away by Joyce Carol Oates. She has won six AudioFile Earphones Awards.