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Download Fair Game: My Life as a Spy, My Betrayal by the White House Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Fair Game: My Life as a Spy, My Betrayal by the White House Audiobook, by Valerie Plame Wilson Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,112 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Valerie Plame Wilson Narrator: Valerie Plame Wilson Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2007 ISBN: 9780743571234
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An unvarnished account of the personal and international consequences of speaking truth to power

On July 6, 2003, four months after the United States invaded Iraq, former Ambassador Joseph Wilson’s now historic op-ed, “What I Didn’t Find in Africa,” appeared in the New York Times. A week later, conservative pundit Robert Novak revealed in his newspaper column that Ambassador Wilson’s wife, Valerie Plame Wilson, was a covert CIA agent. The public disclosure of that classified information spurred a federal investigation and led to the trial and conviction of Vice President Dick Cheney’s chief of staff, Scooter Libby, and the Wilsons’ civil suit against top officials of the Bush administration. Much has been written about the “Valerie Plame” story, but Valerie herself has been silent—until now. Some of what has been reported about her has been frighteningly accurate, serving as a pungent reminder to the Wilsons that their lives are no longer private. And some has been completely false: distorted characterizations of Valerie and her husband and their shared integrity.

Valerie Wilson retired from the CIA in January 2006, and now she sets the record straight, providing an extraordinary account of her experiences, and answers many questions that have been asked about her covert status, her responsibilities, and her life. As listeners will hear, the CIA still deems much of the detail of Valerie’s story to be classified. And as a public service, an afterword, drawn from the public record by national security reporter Laura Rozen, provides a context for Valerie’s own account.

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Quotes & Awards

  • Fair Game—which takes its title from Karl Rove’s phrase about the legitimacy of blowing Ms. Wilson’s professional camouflage—describes how intense stress wrought havoc on the Wilsons’ marriage, not to mention Ms. Wilson’s state of mind…[And] she powerfully evokes the disbelief, fury and uncharacteristic terror that came with being outed.” 

    The New York Times 

  • “Plame had a front-row seat on both the politicization of pre-war intelligence and White House efforts to stem post-invasion criticism…[She] can be viewed as a canary in the proverbial coal mine, and her book reads like a grim testament to the noxious atmosphere of our current politics.” 

    Boston Globe 

  • “An extraordinary account of her training and experiences, and answers many questions that have been asked about her covert status, her responsibilities, and her life.” 

    Amazon.com, editorial review

  • “Wilson reads clearly, with immediacy and sincerity and a note of barely suppressed anger.” 

    Publishers Weekly

  • “Among the risks faced by men and women who volunteer to serve in our intelligence services are those which derive from American politics. This story shows us how strong the desire to serve can be and how treacherous the risks are in the minefields of Washington. Valerie Wilson volunteered at the height of the cold war. She expected to be betrayed by our enemies, not us.” 

    Bob Kerrey, Former United States Senator and Vice Chairman, Senate Select Committee on Intelligence 

  • “Plame spent a courageous and honorable career on the front lines of terrorism only to come home and meet the ultimate betrayal, her own country—unethical politicians and unscrupulous journalists. Plame’s story is a modern odyssey, a cautionary tale that should make Americans think twice before sacrificing their patriots.” 

    Lobert Baer, Former CIA Case Officer and the author of See No Evil and Sleeping With The Devil 

  • A New York Times Bestseller

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bernadette | 2/19/2014

    " It looked interesting but lacked a lot. Hard to plow through. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mary | 2/8/2014

    " Valerie Plame and Joe Wilson were caught in the net of the "Imperial Presidency" and they became victims of the neocons. Two people who spent 20+ years serving their country became collateral damage of liars who confused covering lies of the President/Vice President with what was good for the country. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Leofwin | 1/20/2014

    " Man, did they (the Bush Republican machine) screw her. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ann | 1/18/2014

    " If the Cheney cabal can do this to a highly trained CIA operative and her former ambassador husband, then what might the ordinary citizen expect. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jennifer Skiff | 1/13/2014

    " This is a must read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mylinda | 1/1/2014

    " A lot of redaction in the book, but overall an okay read. Basically the story of the spy who was outed by the White House from the spy's perspective. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Florence May | 12/28/2013

    " The book was educational in CIA 101 and character assassination. Important read. However, Incredibly repetitive. Could have been half the length and still hit the mark. The numerous passages that were redacted by the CIA didn't bother me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Richard | 12/1/2013

    " Plame Wilson comes across well here, articulate and likable. But all the redacted prose here is disorienting and frustrating with words, sentences and sometimes entire paragraphs completely removed. Even after reading this book, I felt like her complete story still eluded me. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Aysharoberts | 11/1/2013

    " Hard to read with many words/sentences crossed out literally. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cheryl | 9/21/2012

    " Taken aback at first by the redacted text. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Steve Mount | 6/10/2012

    " Inspiring yet frightening and heart-breaking. The redactions are annoying, but illustrative. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Angela | 6/9/2012

    " I enjoyed learning about this story that had so much news coverage. It was very frustrating to muddle through all the blocked text yet glad I read it. It was also cool to learn more about the CIA. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jasonspaul | 12/8/2011

    " Reading between the lines was both annoying and enticing, but the epilogue explained things that were left unanswered. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Kelly | 9/24/2011

    " I was really looking forward to reading this book. That is until I started it and found out that half of it has been blacked out! I read about 50 pages and had to put it down. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julie | 5/4/2011

    " It feels like a quarter of it is censored, although the essay at the end helps put things in perspective. I still am confused why everyone cared so much about Joe's supposed "boondoggle". What did that have to do with anything? "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Colleen | 4/26/2011

    " It had potential, but ultimately all the blocked out portions just became too much.. it was really disjointed. Plus, I kind of felt like she and her husband were a little on the whiny side. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kathy | 4/25/2011

    " Too bad so much of the book was redacted by the CIA, but still an excellent story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sandra | 4/25/2011

    " Amazing what Governments can get away with. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jacob | 4/23/2011

    " basically a great book, but SO redacted it's a real challenge to read. the low rating has nothing to do with the quality of writing or content, just the overall readability of the thing. with so much redacted, it's almost impossible to follow. shame on you, CIA... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Megan | 4/3/2011

    " Interesting insight into the Valerie Wilson scandal, the Bush administration, and the CIA. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Bethany | 3/13/2011

    " I did not finish this book. It was alright, but didn't really grab me. I think it might make a better movie. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lorie | 3/8/2011

    " Full of good guys and bad guys like a novel. Too bad the redacting makes it so disjointed. I can't wait to see the movie. Good people seem to get screwed by republicans every day. I have yet to be convinced that there are any republicans with integrity. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michelle | 3/7/2011

    " Loved this book - a fascinating look at the lengths to which the Bush White House would go to justify its war with Iraq. Full disclosure: I wrote an article about the "outing" of Wilson as a CIA officer for a legal journal, so there was almost no way I wouldn't devour this book. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Toni | 2/19/2011

    " Bit heavy on politics, low on scandal & action thus far "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Hank | 2/13/2011

    " I suspect that Ms. Wilson has a fascinating story to tell, but I can't be sure, because she's such a terrible writer. If a book ever made the case for the advantages of using the services of a professional ghost writer, this is it.
    "

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About the Author
Author Valerie Plame Wilson

Valerie Plame Wilson, former CIA covert operations officer, was born on Elmendorf Air Force base in Anchorage, Alaska, in 1963. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Pennsylvania State University and master’s degrees from the London School of Economics and Political Science and the College of Europe in Bruges, Belgium. Her career in the CIA included extensive work in counterproliferation operations, working to ensure that enemies of the United States could not threaten America with weapons of mass destruction, until Richard Armitage leaked her identity. She and her husband, Ambassador Joe Wilson, live in New Mexico with their children.