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3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (352 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Megan Stack Narrator: Dana Green Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: June 2010 ISBN: 9780307736000
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A shattering account of war and disillusionment from a young woman reporter on the front lines of the war on terror. 

A few weeks after the planes crashed into the World Trade Center on 9/11, journalist Megan Stack, a  twenty-five-year-old national correspondent for the Los Angeles Times, was thrust into Afghanistan and Pakistan, dodging gunmen and prodding warlords for information. From there, she traveled to war-ravaged Iraq and Lebanon and other countries scarred by violence, including Israel, Egypt, Libya, and Yemen, witnessing the changes that swept the Muslim world and laboring to tell its stories. 

Every Man in This Village Is a Liar is Stack’s riveting account of what she saw in the combat zones and beyond. She relates her initial wild excitement and her slow disillusionment as the cost of violence outweighs the elusive promise of freedom and democracy. She reports from under bombardment in Lebanon; records the raw pain of suicide bombings in Israel and Iraq; and, one by one, marks the deaths and disappearances of those she interviews. 

Beautiful, savage, and unsettling, Every Man in This Village Is a Liar is a memoir about the wars of the twenty-first century that readers will long remember.

Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “Journalist Megan Stack sheds the customary pretenses of her profession to show us—with blistering eloquence and her own raw nerves laid bare—war’s impact on the non-combatants who bear the brunt of its horrors. You’ll be thinking about this book long after you turn the final page.”

    Jon Krakauer, New York Times bestselling author of Where Men Win Glory

  • “[An] extraordinary book: Stack removes all the usual nonsense from war reporting. What you read here is the truth, gorgeously rendered in shimmering sentences but unrelenting all the same.”

    Joe Klein, New York Times bestselling author of The Natural

  • “An electrifying book…[Megan Stack] shows us what war and terror have done to humanity in the twenty-first century. Read it if you have the courage to care about your country, its allies, and its enemies.” 

    Tim Weiner, New York Times bestselling author of Legacy of Ashes

  • “For readers frustrated with cold and unfeeling news coverage, Megan K. Stack’s Every Man in This Village Is a Liar will serve as a much-needed antidote…Personal and impassioned…Refreshingly candid and undeniably affecting.”

    San Francisco Chronicle

  • “A moving and unsettling account of war reporting in the age of terror…Brave and engaged.” 

    Los Angeles Times

  • “Above and beyond the twenty-four-hour news chatter, opaque papers, and truncated press reports, stands Megan K. Stack’s glittering Every Man in This Village is a Liar.”

    Christian Science Monitor

  • “A piercing take on what it’s like to be a female correspondent in today’s Middle East.”

    Vogue

  • “Bracing…Of lasting importance.”

    Elle

  • “Stack’s book may be the best account yet of the so-called ‘War on Terror.’”

    Independent (London)

  • “A brave and beautifully written book…[Stack] conveys is a war without direction and so badly managed that it has left in its wake a string of shattered societies across the globe.”

    Sunday Times (London)

  • “Evocative…with her fine journalistic eye, [Stack captures] what she sees and hears and [presents] it alongside enough taut analysis to move her accounts beyond the merely factual.”

    Guardian (London)

  • “Without stories like Stack’s, war becomes impersonal and easy to gloss over, relegated to page two. These stories—personal and vulnerable—are meaningful, if for no other reason than they force us to look again.” 

    Minneapolis Star-Tribune

  • “[Stack’s] vivid, atmospheric prose and keen empathy make her a superb observer of the region's horrific particulars.”

    Publishers Weekly

  • “Anyone wishing to understand the Middle East need only look into the faces of war that Stack renders with exceptional humanity—the bombers as well as the bureaucrats, the rebels and the refugees, the victors and the victims.”

    Booklist (starred review)

  • “A bell-clear, powerful indictment of the debacle of recent Middle Eastern war policy.”

    Kirkus Reviews

  • Nominated for the Barnes & Noble Discover Award
  • A 2010 National Book Award Finalist

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dagneyms | 2/11/2014

    " I absolutely loved this book! Her descriptions and emotions brought the middle east and the war alive. Definitely work a read! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Vickie | 2/10/2014

    " This book is an incredible view of war from a reporters viewpoint - graphic but very believable. read it! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Zack | 2/1/2014

    " This book was from the point of view of a journalist beginning right after 9/11 happened. She was sent to Afghanistan to report from the front lines and continued into Iraq, Lybia and Egypt. Some of the details might be on the extreme side for some, but they are necessary for her story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Stuart | 1/28/2014

    " It's well worth reading, if you don't mind the occasional passage of purple prose. The pluses far out-weigh the negatives, however. Stack gives the reader a different, and more personal, perspective than do most media reports from "the region." "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kara | 1/23/2014

    " Newspaper reporter Megan Stack happened to be on vacation in Paris when the United States launched the war in Afghanistan. Over the next few years, she reported on wars and unrest in Iraq, Libya, Egypt and Lebanon. She's a reporter, and she writes like one- mostly facts, and a few criticisms of the War on Terror and its consequences. There are no answers here, which makes it a scary and depressing read-- but extremely interesting, especially given the upheaval in the Middle East this year. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Holly | 1/16/2014

    " Stack's personal experiences, observations, impressions and portraits of the men and women she encounters as a young, female Middle East correspondent for the LA Times. Reminiscent of Chris Hedges in its revelations on war? Not history, analysis, background - but would make a good companion to more analytical political or historical books. Prescient insights on Mubarak's Egypt and Qaddafi's regime in Libya. The audio book was really good - the female reader hit all the right "notes," and even did voices (incl. GW Bush!). "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Victoria | 1/8/2014

    " Atmospheric, gritty but gloomy "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michelle Dancer | 11/10/2013

    " A very emotional book with lots of great stories and very well written. Reading/listening to this book reminds me of the evil that lurks in less fortunate places of the world. The book will certainly open your mind to thoughts on human nature and humanistic fascination with power. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Dawn | 10/24/2013

    " Very interesting book, more like a series of articles than a free flowing narrative. Once you realize the story is going to be told like articles, it is much easier to read. I recommend for anyone interested in Middle East politics and/or the various military conflicts in the region. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Christine | 10/16/2013

    " Could not finish this book. Too graphic for a non-fiction book for my tastes. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Brenna Heagney | 10/15/2013

    " Stories were interesting but poorly edited with way too many similes! The writing really detracted from my enjoyment. Flowery language and imagery were a turn off - way better non-fiction out there "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Zuzana | 1/13/2013

    " I didn't like the author and her style. But what she writes about is interesting, and the book contains one of the best brief summaries of how surreal Yemen is in her conversation with a judge high on qat. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sally | 10/24/2012

    " Currently listening to audio version, unabridged. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rena | 4/22/2012

    " Very realistic and bleak outlook regarding the War on Terror that our country and the Middle East are involved in. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Megan | 4/14/2012

    " "An education in war" is the book's sub-title, which pretty much sums it up. Definitely opened my eyes to a lot of things about the "war on terror" that I would have never read about in the media. Very honest, brutal, and poetic, all at the same time. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dale Copps | 5/25/2011

    " Brilliant war stories from the Islamic front. That this lovely, youngish woman could have gotten where she got and written what she wrote--a miracle. And still we fight. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Christine | 4/7/2011

    " Could not finish this book. Too graphic for a non-fiction book for my tastes. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Greg | 2/18/2011

    " This book nearly broke my heart. Some of the most clearly-written writing on the Middle East out there. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mitchell | 1/21/2011

    " it helps that she's a terrific writer.. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michelle | 1/20/2011

    " A very emotional book with lots of great stories and very well written. Reading/listening to this book reminds me of the evil that lurks in less fortunate places of the world. The book will certainly open your mind to thoughts on human nature and humanistic fascination with power. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Karen | 1/15/2011

    " an amazing and important book to read, especially given the recent events in the Middle East that are still evolving even today! Very readable and really heartwrenching! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mary | 1/9/2011

    " Very well-written, very discouraging about Lebanon,
    Iraq, Pakistan--all countries she covered for the LA
    Times, where she saw the US presence usually doing
    plenty of harm and very little of lasting good. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sally | 1/1/2011

    " Currently listening to audio version, unabridged. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Vickie | 12/27/2010

    " This book is an incredible view of war from a reporters viewpoint - graphic but very believable. read it! "

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About the Author

Megan Stack has reported on war, terrorism, and political Islam from twenty-two countries since 2001. She was awarded the 2007 Overseas Press Club’s Hal Boyle Award for best newspaper reporting from abroad and was a finalist for the 2007 Pulitzer Prize in international reporting. She is currently the Los Angeles Times Moscow bureau chief.

About the Narrator

Dana Green is an audiobook narrator whose readings include Join the Club by Tina Rosenberg, Every Man in This Village Is a Liar by Megan Stack, and Betsy Ross and the Making of America by Marla R. Miller.