Extended Audio Sample

Download Endless Forms Most Beautiful: The New Science of Evo Devo and the Making of the Animal Kingdom Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Endless Forms Most Beautiful: The New Science of Evo Devo and the Making of the Animal Kingdom (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Sean B. Carroll
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (1,074 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Sean B. Carroll Narrator: Arthur Morey Publisher: Brilliance Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: June 2009 ISBN:
Coming Soon! We're adding audiobooks daily and hope to make this one available for download very soon. Submit your vote below to let us know you really crave this title!
Vote this up! This audiobook has 0 votes

For over a century, opening the black box of embryonic development was the holy grail of biology. Evo Devo--Evolutionary Developmental Biology--is the new science that has finally cracked open the box. Within the pages of his rich and riveting book, Sean B. Carroll explains how we are discovering that complex life is ironically much simpler than anyone ever expected. Perhaps the most surprising finding of Evo Devo is the discovery that a small number of primitive genes led to the formation of fundamental organs and appendages in all animal forms.

The gene that causes humans to form arms and legs is the same gene that causes birds and insects to form wings, and fish to form fins; similarly, one ancient gene has led to the creation of eyes across the animal kingdom. Changes in the way this ancient tool kit of genes is used have created all the diversity that surrounds us.

Sean Carroll is the ideal author to lead the curious on this intellectual adventure--he is the acknowledged leader of the field, and his seminal discoveries have been featured in Time and The New York Times. Download and start listening now!

BK_BRLL_001739

Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Barbm1020 | 1/31/2014

    " This book is a fine explanation of developmental evolution. It is easy to follow and even entertaining for anybody with an unbiased curiosity about nature. It's an attractive volume with some amazing color plates illustrating some of the experiments that have shown scientists how DNA works in insect larvae. There are also photos of fossils and drawings of various animals as they once appeared and as they exist now. A very important book for all biology teachers, college students, school board members and home schoolers, it is easy enough for me to understand and I was not not a bio major. Religious fundamentalists to the contrary, there is no reason to fear for our values in facing the truth about the world around us, and it's time American schoolchildren caught up with the 20 countries where students scored better than our kids on biology questions. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Herman | 1/26/2014

    " A very interesting read, with insight into the evolutionary process from the perspective of evolutionary development (Evo Devo, or embryonic development). It does get rather technical for the non-biologist at times, something that is necessary to gain a proper understanding, but results in a difficult, slow read. In retrospect, I've forgotten most of the specifics of this book, but the overall impression whilst reading was one of complete awe, and left me with a better understanding of the science as a whole. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cathy Douglas | 1/3/2014

    " This is the best kind of science book, one written by a leading scientist to make new ideas available to non-scientists. This was a dense book, and I had a hard time following it in places. But it was well worth the effort. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sally | 12/27/2013

    " Boy, did I enjoy this book! It describes the field of evolutionary developmental biology very clearly for the general reader. The author, a researcher in this field, is a good writer and he gives fascinating explanations of how a single cell becomes a body of very diverse cells, even though all the cells have identical DNA (its largely the genetic switches). Also, in exploring the relations among creatures in the animal kingdom, he emphasizes the deep evolutionary and genetic unity, much deeper than biologists expected, among members of the entire kingdom that recent comparative embryonic and genetic research has revealed. I like that he goes into enough detail about research findings so that you get some feeling for the data as well as the mechanisms behind evolution. Highly recommended. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 John | 11/27/2013

    " The new science of evolutionary developmental biology finally exposed the molecular toolkits life uses to build species, whether fish or termites or us. Wildly important book, in spite of his acceptance of 1 quoted study I find incorrect. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cora Judd | 11/20/2013

    " Elegantly written book exploring evolutionary developmental biology to explain what might be mystifying human behaviors. A bit heavy in spots but a definite "re-read". "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 James | 11/4/2013

    " Nice supplement to Origin of Species, but not a substitute, nor a recent best thing on the subject. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Stephen Hampshire | 9/30/2013

    " Brilliant book. Easy to read and yet doesn't skimp on the science. I understand Evo Devo about 400% more than I did before reading it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kath | 9/8/2013

    " If you like books on Evolution, try this one! In the style of Steven Jay Gould, Carroll brings together the latest molecular biology breakthroughs with fossils and development. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Beth | 8/12/2013

    " Good treatment of evo devo for newbies. Caroll is a science writer, so is easy to understand. Recommend for beginners. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jena | 6/18/2013

    " Evo-devo is a very interesting subject, but this book got a bit boring. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Greg | 4/7/2013

    " I think this is a really good evo devo book, even if it is pretty heavy going at times, mostly because it is so information dense. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Adam | 1/7/2013

    " I didn't finish this, unfortunately. Still enjoyed what I read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Charles | 7/15/2012

    " Very good introduction to Evo-Devo, which is the place where the theory of evolution meets embryology. Definitely worth a read if you are interested in that area. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jen | 5/3/2012

    " Excellent readable review of one of the leading areas of our knowledge of evolution. Shows how little changes in genes can lead to the greater changes that we now know. My 8th graders read a section of it, and liked the photo of the drosophila mutants and the cyclops lamb. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Steve | 2/26/2012

    " Awesome book! Although there is one chapter that would go above just about anyones head (except for perhaps the authors) this is an accessible and fascinating book and the must read on the topic of Evo devo "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Miss | 11/12/2011

    " Truly well written and a fascinating read! Highly recommended!! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kevin | 9/9/2011

    " interesting education on the evolutionary development. some fascinating parts describing the near infinite variability influencing how we grow and what we become. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jared Decker | 5/20/2011

    " This book was exactly what I wanted. It was a fascinating and descriptive introduction into the field of Evo Devo. I love how Carroll was able to relate childhood interest in animal forms to modern scientific inquiry. I would recommend this book to anyone with an interest in genetics or evolution. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Charlie | 5/15/2011

    " Been a long time since my undergraduate bio classes - makes me wish I would have continued to follow the developmental bio field. The writing was ok. Not as interesting and as captivating or engaging as I was hoping. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 John | 3/22/2011

    " There was a lot of interesting information in here but the way it was presented, I found it difficult to get through the book. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Todd | 4/11/2010

    " I couldn't quite follow the details of the specific genetic triggers for spots vs stripes, but developmental biology adds some details to the mechanisms used in species evolution. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jena | 3/21/2010

    " Evo-devo is a very interesting subject, but this book got a bit boring. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Stephen | 3/12/2010

    " Brilliant book. Easy to read and yet doesn't skimp on the science. I understand Evo Devo about 400% more than I did before reading it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kevin | 3/9/2010

    " interesting education on the evolutionary development. some fascinating parts describing the near infinite variability influencing how we grow and what we become. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lalena | 2/6/2010

    " Most exciting book on evolution for the general public since Stephen J Gould's work. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julie | 12/20/2009

    " Very accessible science writing about a devloping field of biology. Anyone interested in evolution should read this book. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 John | 12/17/2009

    " The new science of evolutionary developmental biology finally exposed the molecular toolkits life uses to build species, whether fish or termites or us. Wildly important book, in spite of his acceptance of 1 quoted study I find incorrect. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tammy | 10/23/2009

    " Sean Carroll has proven to be interesting and informative with every reading. He provides interesting research to back up his ideas in evo devo. Carroll is one of my personal favorites in the scientific community. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 As8272 | 8/3/2009

    " Half way through, but incrediby stimulating. Particularly the small portion on fate mapping. Sadly, only a small whetting of one's whistle. "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author

Sean B. Carroll is a professor of molecular biology and genetics and an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at the University of Wisconsin and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

About the Narrator

Arthur Morey graduated from Harvard and did graduate work at the University of Chicago. He has won awards for his fiction and drama, worked as an editor with several book publishers, and taught literature and writing at Northwestern University. As a narrator, he has received nineteen AudioFile Earphones Awards and been a finalist for the prestigious Audie Award.