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Download Emma's War: A True Story Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Emmas War: A True Story (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Deborah Scroggins
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (710 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Deborah Scroggins Narrator: Kate Reading Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc. Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 2007 ISBN:
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The adventurous young British relief worker Emma McCune came to Sudan determined to make a difference. She became a near legend in the bullet-scarred, famine-ridden country, but her eventual marriage to a rebel warlord made international headlines and spelled disastrous consequences for her ideals. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mairead Fitzsimmons | 2/6/2014

    " Interesting read on the conflict in the Sudan. The book provides some historical insights to the origins of the tribal conflicts in the region but follows the story of an aid worker who married a rebel leader. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Matt | 2/6/2014

    " This book, telling the story of at least one and maybe a couple cycles of the ongoing conflict in Sudan through the actions of relief worker turned Warlord's wife is pretty amazing. I mean, the story itself beggars the imagination, and the situation, the real day to day complexity and level of fucked-upness of the circumstances in Sudan is both deeply moving and incredibly depressing. Add to that Scroggin's own experiences in reporting this story, and you've got a pretty masterful book. There's an awful lot in this book to admire, though very little of it makes you feel good about the world or any of our chances. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Richard | 1/26/2014

    " My cousin recommended this when I mentioned my admiration of Mountains Beyond Mountains. Emma is no Paul Farmer, but she is a fascinating person none the less. Deborah Scroggins, the author, uses this British woman to hook us on an an analysis of what is now Suddan. It is the first time I feel as if I've really understood what is/has happened there. But as in really good books, you come away from this difficult read with more understandings of the West, of Africa, of humanitarian 'aid,' greed, idealism, the destructiveness of pursuit of power, as well as the naivete of going into a country without an understanding of its history, its divisions, its previous struggles. This book will stay with me for a long time, I suspect. Not only because I was in the Peace Corps in Sierre Leone in the 60s with my own illusions of helping, but because it teaches that all the parties have responsibility for the disasters in Sudan, and throughout other parts of Africa that have had/are having similar wars. Emma's War, read along with What is the What will make you angry and sad, but you will come away with greater understanding and insights into Sudan, Africa, the West, and mankind. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Natalie Truesdell | 1/18/2014

    " Read this book to learn the history of Sudan, the connections to bin Laden, and the complexities of foreign aid. The love story helps keep the thread of history more digestible. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tracey | 1/9/2014

    " One of the first books I read in my continuing obsession with books about Africa, it is a fascinating memoir about a British woman who fell in love with a Sudanese rebel. I learned so much about the Sudan and have a (slightly) better understanding of what is going on in that eternally volatile region. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carmen like the opera | 12/4/2013

    " Deborah Scroggins was able to weave current events and background on the title character into a compelling story. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elizabeth | 12/3/2013

    " 'Emma's War" uses the story of Emma McCune (a white woman who, among other dumb decisions, married a Sudanese warlord before she was killed in a car accident in Nairobi) to explore the origins and complexity of the Sudanese civil war (N-S, not so much on Darfur), including the challenge and culture of the humanitarian and journalistic response. I found this to be a well-written and rather accessible look at a bloody complicated crisis - particularly its origins and the claims and goals of various involved parties. Scroggins uses Emma as her story's needle, following her descriptions of Emma's experiences with a closer look at the conflict, conditions on the ground and the international response. Emma is no heroine, but it's a very helpful (if discouraging) explanation of the Sudanese conflict. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 olivia | 12/2/2013

    " I just could not get into this book. Perhaps because Emma was just such a crazy woman, and it was hard for me to relate to her motives. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Young | 11/18/2013

    " A very introspective book about aid work, oil in Sudan, and politics. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elizabetta | 11/14/2013

    " I read this while I was in Ethiopia. Stunning. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Trish | 10/1/2013

    " Amazing the tangled web between aid and development. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 alicia | 7/23/2013

    " Any Westerner who is going to Africa, has been to Africa or is even remotely interested in Africa should read this book (particularly East Africa). Even if you've just heard of Africa you should read it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jen | 5/7/2013

    " I liked this book, because the author doesn't make excuses for emma's actions or her life, Emma married a high up in the SPLA and was deemed responsible by many southern sudanese for the split in the SPLA. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Holly | 4/18/2013

    " This book lures you into the intense history of Sudan and just won't let go ... and then there is Emma, portrayed as an almost mythical character flitting around Sudan like a humanitarian temptress. This is a book to own. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Meg Petersen | 4/18/2013

    " Very interesting about a part of the world I am less familiar with and a real indictment of the "aid business". I found it thought provoking. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jackie | 12/7/2012

    " a well documented account of a forbidden love affair. a realistic portrayal of sudan and the atrocities committed there pre-darfur hype. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cat Mckaig | 1/6/2012

    " I really enjoyed this book- maybe because I was in North Sudan at the time, but Deborah Scroggins does a really good job of telling a complex story- about being an outsider in a complex situation. It is very well written. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Andy | 7/3/2011

    " This book is about a British aid worker who ends up marrying a Sudanese warlord, but it also doubles as a primer on the troubles in Sudan, which was interesting. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Barrett | 4/28/2011

    " A character portrait of an unlikeable woman that gives way to an important explanation of the complex and storied conflict in southern Sudan. Politics and characters extend into Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, and the UK. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Danna | 4/16/2011

    " Excellent book. I loved the way the author wove her own journalistic experience in Sudan with Sudan's history and Emma's life story. A reality check about the politics of war, famine, oil, and foreign aid in the horn of Africa. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amie | 3/31/2011

    " Have been remembering this book because of today's formation of South Sudan. I read it years ago, not once but twice. It gave me a lot to think about. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jenny | 3/2/2011

    " Bizarre true story about an Englishwoman who marries a Sudanese war lord. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kristi | 3/1/2011

    " When a foreign aid worker falls in love with a war lord in Sudan, there are unexpected consequences. A great exploration into a country known for the atrocities of genocide and those who perpetrate it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jessica | 12/4/2010

    " Very insightful, you really see the way NGO / nonprofit work in developing countries is not all roses and sunshine. An interesting and important perspective. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Chelsey | 10/13/2010

    " great book. (lots of typos, ha.) But so helpful to read, and fascinating. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jan | 4/6/2010

    " While this had a lot interesting information about Sudanese history, I simply could not get into the main character because she was so unsympathetic to me. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Barrett | 11/19/2009

    " A character portrait of an unlikeable woman that gives way to an important explanation of the complex and storied conflict in southern Sudan. Politics and characters extend into Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, and the UK. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jen | 10/18/2009

    " I liked this book, because the author doesn't make excuses for emma's actions or her life, Emma married a high up in the SPLA and was deemed responsible by many southern sudanese for the split in the SPLA. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mandy | 9/16/2009

    " Debroah Scroggins does a good job of unravelling the extremely complicated web of revolution and its tarnished players in the Sudan. Not light reading but worth it, if you're interested in the subject. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Holly | 5/3/2009

    " This book lures you into the intense history of Sudan and just won't let go ... and then there is Emma, portrayed as an almost mythical character flitting around Sudan like a humanitarian temptress. This is a book to own. "

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About the Author

Deborah Scoggins has won six national journalism awards for her reporting from Sudan and the Middle East. A former correspondent for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, she has published articles in Granta, The Independent, and elsewhere. She lives in Atlanta.

About the Narrator

Kate Reading is an Audie Award–winning narrator and has received numerous Earphones Awards from AudioFile magazine. She is also a theater actor in the Washington, DC, area and has been a member of the Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company since 1987. Her work onstage has been recognized by the Helen Hayes Awards Society, among others. She and her husband live in Hyattsville, Maryland, with their two children.