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Extended Audio Sample Dopefiend, by Donald Goines Click for printable size audiobook cover
0 out of 50 out of 50 out of 50 out of 50 out of 5 0.00 (0 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Donald Goines Narrator: Kevin Kenerl Publisher: Blackstone Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date:
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The shocking nightmare story of a black heroin addict

Trapped in the festering sore of a major American ghetto, a young man and his girlfriend—both attractive, talented, and full of promise—are inexorably pulled into the living death of the hardcore junkie. It is a horrifying world where addicts will do anything to get their next fix.

For twenty-three years of his young life, Donald Goines lived in the dark, despair-ridden world of the junkie. It started while he was doing military service in Korea and ended with his murder in his late thirties. He had worked up to a hundred-dollars-a-day habit—and out of the agonizing hell came Dopefiend.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “This classic title of 1970s street fiction has never been out of print owing to its gritty depiction of the realities of an addict’s lifestyle.”

    Library Journal

  • “One of hip-hop’s greatest inspirations.”

    Source magazine, praise for the author

  • “Donald Goines was for the streets [in the ’70s] what the rappers are today…He was in the streets, of the streets, and spoke for the streets.”

    Chaz Williams, CEO of Black Hand Entertainment, praise for the author

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About the Author

Donald Goines (1936–1974) was a career criminal and addict who took up writing during one of his seven prison sentences. Between 1969 and 1974, he published sixteen novels, which are now recognized as almost unbearably authentic portraits of the roughest aspects of the black experience.