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Download Create Your Own Economy: The Path to Prosperity in a Disordered World Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Create Your Own Economy: The Path to Prosperity in a Disordered World Audiobook, by Tyler Cowen Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (223 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Tyler Cowen Narrator: Patrick Lawlor Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2009 ISBN: 9781400182190
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How will we live well in a super-networked, information-soaked, yet predictably irrational world? The only way to know is to understand how the way we think is changing.

As economist Tyler Cowen boldly shows in Create Your Own Economy, the way we think now is changing more rapidly than it has in a very long time. Not since the Industrial Revolution has a man-made creation—in this case, the World Wide Web—so greatly influenced the way our minds work and our human potential. Cowen argues brilliantly that we are breaking down cultural information into ever-smaller tidbits, ordering and reordering them in our minds (and our computers) to meet our own specific needs.

Create Your Own Economy explains why the coming world of Web 3.0 is good for us, why social networking sites such as Facebook are so necessary, what’s so great about “Tweeting” and texting, how education will get better, and why politics, literature, and philosophy will become richer. This is a revolutionary guide to life in the new world.

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Michelledenisenorton | 2/13/2014

    " I have no idea why autism is neither in the blurb or the title because that's what the book is about, everything is wrapped around the author's hypothesis that autistic thought patterns might be more suited to the modern age. Which is a fine hypothesis but the book does limit itself as a result and never really gets to what it claims it will in the title. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joe Miller | 2/12/2014

    " This would be worth reading just for the chapter on Sherlock Holmes. Fortunately, the rest of it is good, too. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chris | 2/10/2014

    " An interesting book that discusses the cognitive traits of autistics and relates them to things like the internet, Facebook, Twitter, the IPod, politics, and other subjects. The idea is that these technologies allow us to impose our own order on things that were previously ordered for us (e.g. MP3 files versus CDs) and the desire to impose order and classification on things are autistic traits. The discussion of the strengths of autistic traits was interesting as well as the discussion about how many influential historical figures such as Adam Smith may have had these traits as well (though Cowen is careful to point out that it is impossible to make a firm diagnosis based just on history). It is a book that covers an unusual, but very interesting, set of topics. Fans of Cowen's work (which I am one) will enjoy it. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Francois | 2/10/2014

    " Couldn't do it. Got really boring really quick. Not my thing. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Marc | 1/27/2014

    " People love this guy. I don't quite get it. A lot about Asbergers and Autism. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sam | 1/26/2014

    " The intersection of neurodiversity, economics, psychology & technological progress. Yeah! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jodi | 1/1/2014

    " Interesting and perceptive! Cowen draws upon a number of fields in this book, and it definitely opened up my eyes to some new things. At times the book reads like a collection of blog posts or essays; it could use a bit of reorganizing and editing. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kahhl Kerksiek | 1/1/2014

    " Book was mostly navel gazing on autism from Tyler. Abandoned it halfway through. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Padraic | 12/30/2013

    " A very interesting read. A lot of great ideas about the value of the internet and modern culture; gets bogged down in the details of autism at some point. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 bobby mccormick | 10/11/2013

    " wonderful and insightful work by one of the original thinkers of our day "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michael Broshi | 10/20/2012

    " Chock full of fascinating ideas. A celebration of neurodiversity. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Aaron Haspel | 6/21/2012

    " "Create Your Own Inner Life" would have been a more accurate if less arresting title. By "prosperity" Cowen means rich interiority, not actually, you know, money. As long as you take him in the proper spirit you can extract a good deal from the book. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Deb Holden | 1/14/2012

    " I finished 70% of the book and it still seemed to be going nowhere. Some interesting facts and ideas but no enough to keep interest. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 John | 1/9/2012

    " This guy sure thinks that autistics have it all figured out. Pretty much the underlying theme of every chapter. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Major Doug | 5/9/2011

    " Listened to this book: some interesting tips; however, the autism parts seemed a bit forced. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Francois | 2/1/2011

    " Couldn't do it. Got really boring really quick. Not my thing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joe | 12/30/2010

    " This would be worth reading just for the chapter on Sherlock Holmes. Fortunately, the rest of it is good, too. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Deb | 10/30/2010

    " I finished 70% of the book and it still seemed to be going nowhere. Some interesting facts and ideas but no enough to keep interest. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Thirsty_Mind | 11/29/2009

    " A very interesting read. A lot of great ideas about the value of the internet and modern culture; gets bogged down in the details of autism at some point. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Marc | 11/22/2009

    " People love this guy. I don't quite get it. A lot about Asbergers and Autism. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kahhl | 10/19/2009

    " Book was mostly navel gazing on autism from Tyler. Abandoned it halfway through. "

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About the Author
Author Tyler Cowen

Tyler Cowen is a professor of economics at George Mason University. His blog, Marginal Revolution, is one of the world’s most influential economics blogs. He also writes for the New York Times, Financial Times, and the Economist. He is the cofounder of Marginal Revolution University and the author of several books. He lives in Fairfax, Virginia.

About the Narrator

Patrick Lawlor, an award-winning narrator, is also an accomplished stage actor, director, and combat choreographer. He has worked extensively off Broadway and has been an actor and stuntman in both film and television. He has been an Audie Award finalist multiple times and has garnered several AudioFile Earphones Awards, a Publishers Weekly Listen-Up Award, and many starred audio reviews from Library Journal and Kirkus Reviews.