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Download Consider the Fork: A History of How We Cook and Eat Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Consider the Fork: A History of How We Cook and Eat Audiobook, by Bee Wilson Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,039 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Bee Wilson Narrator: Alison Larkin Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2012 ISBN: 9781452679570
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Since prehistory, humans have braved the business ends of knives, scrapers, and mashers, all in the name of creating something delicious-or at least edible. In Consider the Fork, award-winning food writer and historian Bee Wilson traces the ancient lineage of our modern culinary tools, revealing the startling history of objects we often take for granted. Charting the evolution of technologies from the knife and fork to the gas range and the sous-vide cooker, Wilson offers unprecedented insights into how we've prepared and consumed food over the centuries-and how those basic acts have changed our societies, our diets, and our very selves. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • Wilson is erudite and whip-smart, but she always grounds her exploration of technological change in the perspective of the eternal harried cook---she's been one---struggling to put a meal on the table. This is mouthwatering history: broad in scope, rich in detail, stuffed with savory food for thought. Publishers Weekly Starred Review
  • “Wilson is a good tour guide…[A] dizzying, entertaining ride.”

    Wall Street Journal

  • “Reading [Consider the Fork] is like having a long dinner table discussion with a fascinating friend…Leisurely but lively…a pure joy to read.”

    Los Angeles Times

  • “Wilson’s insouciant scholarship and companionable voice convince you she would be great fun to spend time with in the kitchen…[She is] a congenial kitchen oracle.”

    New York Times Book Review

  • “Delightful…[An] ebulliently written and unobtrusively learned survey.”

    Harper’s

  • “[A] sparkling…fascinating and entertaining book.”

    Sunday Times (London)

  • “One part science, one part history, and a generous dash of fun.”

    Good Housekeeping

Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lauren Brown | 2/16/2014

    " Eye-opening ... helped me see all of my everyday lifestyle decisions in a new light - and the past in a more pragmatic one. Definitely food for thought! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Red | 2/13/2014

    " very enjoyable. lots of trivia which is what makes life so interesting! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tinika | 2/4/2014

    " Bee Wilson's book, Consider the Fork, looks at the technology behind kitchen tools - what we use to cook/eat with rather than what we eat. She lays out her basic thesis in the introduction: we "have been changed by kitchen technology - the how as well as the what" (p xvii); "the implements we use affect what we eat, how we eat." (p xii). The rest of the book is details but what great details. The tools range from the basic (knife, spoon, containment of fire) to the modern (sous-vide machines.) The tools may speak of a time (marrow spoons) or of the culture that use them (chopsticks.) Bee Wilson also looks at many that were abandoned before finding an audience (the water-powered egg whisk.) She finishes with a chapter on the evolution of the kitchen itself. I leave with a greater appreciation of all the kitchen tools that have made my life easier whether they be a measuring cup, a mixer or a microplane grater. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jeannette | 1/25/2014

    " This wasn't a compelling read, but it was interesting enough and well-written. I also appreciated the little illustrations scattered about. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 John | 1/25/2014

    " The book was a very interesting history of how we prepare food. Its chapters (Pots and Pans, Knife, Fire, Measure, Grind, Eat, Ice and Kitchen) pretty well describe what form the book has taken. As one might imagine with this breadth of interest one part may be much more interesting than the next. Some were weighed down with minute detail while others read easily and were very informative. I enjoyed readiing the book. (I read an ebook version) "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Hoyadaisy | 1/21/2014

    " Too smug; EVERYTHING in excruciating detail. Twee little conclusions with great regularity. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Patricrk patrick | 1/20/2014

    " A delightful series of essays on the history behind how we cook. Did you know that how we prepare food has an impact on where your overbite is? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Debra | 12/26/2013

    " Social history, tech history, business history and anthropology all blend together in this fascinating examination of how gadgets affect our eating habits. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Josh Hamacher | 12/26/2013

    " An enjoyable look at the history of various aspects of food and cooking. There are lengthy chapters on such subjects as the use of utensils and the evolution of chilling foods. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Holly | 12/24/2013

    " Everything you ever wanted to know about cooking technology and utensils :) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Katie G. | 12/17/2013

    " A little repetitive at times. Needs more editing to consolidate thoughts and reduce topic jumps, but all in all a very enjoyable and interesting read. Recommended for wannabe kitchen nerds. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Diane | 12/9/2013

    " Made it through Pots and Pans and the beginning of Knife before setting it aside. While the information is interesting, the writing is pretty dry and I found I was having to force myself to read it. For people that love nonfiction and history lessons, but not for the person with a casual interest. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sheila Waddell | 12/7/2013

    " One of my favorite topics is anthropology and this subject fits right in. Enjoyable reading too. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Fiona | 8/26/2013

    " Loved this. Informative, interesting. Would definitely recommend to anyone who enjoys cooking and/or cooks regularly. Or anyone interested in the history of food. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Heather Meyer | 8/23/2013

    " Interesting read. Never knew there was so much history around kitchen utensils and gadgets! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Daniel Mckillip | 5/30/2013

    " Entirely interesting and engaging to read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Brad Hayes | 5/21/2013

    " This book came highly recommended, but didn't live up to expectations. Not a bad book, just not very rewarding. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Edelhart Kempeneers | 4/18/2013

    " Geen hoogvlieger. Historische oorsprong van lepels: interessant. De kleur van de kookpotten van haar schoonmoeder: minder interessant. Toch een beetje teleurgesteld. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Steve Prekup | 4/18/2013

    " A must read for anyone who likes to cook and spends a lot of time in the kitchen. A history of eating -- a lot of things one doesn't normally think about. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Laure | 2/20/2013

    " This book about the history of various cooking implements, including the lowly pot, got a lot of good reviews but I am not sure I learned a whole lot I didn't already know. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cecily | 2/9/2013

    " As a history nerd I loved this book. Well written, clear, and very informative. It illustrates how technology and culture influence one another by looking at familiar kitchen tools (such as the fork) and shows how tools and culture interact and shape how we eat. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sheri | 11/4/2012

    " I just had to return it. I am thinking of buying it so I can finish it. The book seemed to be interesting. "

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About the Author

Bee Wilson is an award-winning food writer, historian, and author of four books, including Consider the Fork and Swindled. She has been named BBC Radio’s Food Writer of the Year and writes a weekly food column for the Sunday Telegraph’s Stella magazine. Wilson lives in Cambridge, England.

About the Narrator

Alison Larkin is a playwright, stage actress, stand-up comic, voice artist, and Earphones Award–winning narrator whose wide range of voices can be heard in cartoons and movies, including Pocahontas and The Wonder Pets.