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3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (232 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Jeff Sharlet Narrator: Jeremy Guskin Publisher: Hachette Book Group Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: September 2010 ISBN: 9781607886266
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C Street—where piety, politics, and corruption meet

Jeff Sharlet is the only journalist to have reported from inside the C Street House, the Fellowship residence known simply by its Washington, DC, address. The house has lately been the scene of notorious political scandal, but more crucially it is home to efforts to transform the very fabric of American democracy. Now, after laying bare its tenants’ past in The Family, Sharlet reports from deep within fundamentalism in today’s world, revealing that the previous efforts of religious fundamentalists in America pale in comparison with their long-term ambitions.

When Barack Obama entered the White House, headlines declared the age of culture wars over. In C Street, Sharlet shows why these conflicts endure and why they matter now—from the sensationalism of Washington sex scandals to fundamentalism’s long shadow in Africa, where Ugandan culture warriors determined to eradicate homosexuality have set genocide on simmer.

We’ve reached a point where piety and corruption are not at odds but one and the same. Reporting with exclusive sources and explosive documents from C Street, the war on gays in Uganda, and the battle for the soul of America’s armed forces—waged by a movement of fifteen thousand officers intent on “reclaiming territory for Christ in the military”—Sharlet reveals not the last gasp of old-time religion but the new front lines of fundamentalism.

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Quotes & Awards

  • Few writers can pull off investigative journalism, historical research, and elegant storytelling. Sharlet does all this with a story that a lot of people don't want to hear and others won't believe. Diane Winston, author of Red-Hot and Righteous: The Urban Religion of The Salvation Army
  • [Sharlet] writes with insight, verve, and, thankfully, none of the bogus punditry and bad sociology that often passes for informed discourse about the contemporary role of religion in public life. His refreshing narrative style is as engaging as his groundbreaking information. Frederick Clarkson, The Public Eye
  • Un-American theocrats can only fool patriotic American democrats when there aren't critics like Jeff Sharlet around-careful scholars and soulful writers who understand both the majesty of faith and the evil of its abuses. Rick Perlstein, author of Nixonland: The Rise of a President and the Fracturing of America
  • “Much of [Sharlet’s] firsthand reporting is brilliant, even courageous.”

    Washington Post

  • At once a gripping political thriller, a masterpiece of investigative journalism, and a timely call to arms, C Street reveals all that can be hidden within an innocuous Washington address. Jeff Sharlet delivers a warning that the blurring of the line between church and state is both an urgent local problem and a matter of global concern. Peter Manseau, author of Rag and Bone: A Journey Among the World's Holy Dead and Songs for the Butcher's Daughter
  • Jeff Sharlet has an incredibly rare double talent: the instincts of an investigative reporter coupled with the soul of a historian. Hanna Rosin, author of God's Harvard: A Christian College on a Mission to Save America
  • Jeff Sharlet is one of the very best writers covering the politics of religion. Ken Silverstein, author of Turkmeniscam: How Washington Lobbyists Fought to Flack for a Stalinist Dictatorship
  • C Street includes everything a riveting tale about a controversial national movement should—scandal, affairs, conspiracies, death, and, of course, secrecy.”

    Publishers Weekly

  • “That this heavily financed, multilayered organization has been operating for decades—and today is actively implanted within the US military—makes this well-documented, probing investigation even more mind-bending.”

    Booklist

  • “An unsettling account…an eye-opener that rings multiple alarms.”

    Kirkus Reviews

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Colleen | 1/26/2014

    " I was a little frustrated with Sharlet's writing style, which seemed overly impressionistic for the subject matter (other than the last chapter, which does an excellent job of finally tying everything together). But I still think this is a book worth reading, because it really is shocking to learn what's being done behind the scenes to both the American people and to others in our name. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Weemcnab | 1/16/2014

    " This book was quite informative but the information was so disturbing, at times, that I had to avoid reading it and slipping into a depression! The book dragged in moments but overall was eye-opening and I hope to read The Family, Sharlet's earlier book, soon. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Laura | 1/9/2014

    " I agree with other reviews that suggest the book was rushed to print. The book would have benefited from a stronger organization. The book had three parts: 1) Family members that have recently been caught in scandal, 2) the influence of the Family on Uganda's politics, particularly the focus on homosexuality and 3) the increasing voice of Christianity in the US military. For me, the first section in particular could have benefited from more editing. I'm torn on a rating 3 for organization and 4 for content. I went with four. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jim | 12/29/2013

    " A much more readable and even more chilling follow-up to The Family. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shaherzad ahmadi | 12/27/2013

    " Excellent book. I recommend writing notes while you read because it's easy to get confused by the abundance of names and pseudo names of organizations affiliated with the family, and the great number of important politicians and religious figures who work within the domestic and international network of the family. Toward the end of the book, Sharlet strays from C Street and discusses religious fundamentalism in the amerian military and social/political culture more generally. This was somewhat annoying; you keep waiting for it to relate to the original point but it doesn't. Essentially he shifts his focus to address the subtitle of the book 'American fundamentalism' more generally speaking. Altogether a necessary read for American citienzs remotely interested in the evolution of the marriage between the religious element of evangelics and conservative politics. Also, Sharlet is a great writer. I can't tell you how many times I laughed aloud reading this. Fun, educational read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Colin | 12/26/2013

    " I would have rated this higher but it's a little too first person chatty for my liking. Still, the chapters on the fundamentalist Christian influence on the military and their strategy for the third world are terrifying. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Johnny Williams | 12/8/2013

    " Not my bag-- boring-- drags --and not that eye opening-- "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Martine | 12/3/2013

    " Good to know how the fundies in congress are all linked "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Maryc | 10/10/2013

    " Thank God for separation of church and state... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Suzi | 9/12/2013

    " ugh - just what I thought - ugh ugh... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hanley Bonynge | 10/26/2012

    " This book legitimately terrified me. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Harrison | 8/15/2012

    " Scary look at the 'Christian' nutters trying to take over the world. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jim Tucker | 7/8/2012

    " With characteristic, colorful prose, Jeff Sharlet produces the sequal to THE FAMILY. After reading The Family, I expected that this book would add more detail along the same lines. I was not disappointed, but there was not much additional in the way of conceptual development. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anne | 1/14/2012

    " This is one of the most frightening books I've ever read. And I believe every word written. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Amie | 12/29/2011

    " Some of the book was derivative of his earlier book "the Family." "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Chris | 7/26/2011

    " Disturbing look at a group that is successfully manipulating the system for their fundamentalist ends. A sad commentary on the state of politics in this country. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Risa | 4/4/2011

    " More frightening than the zombie apocalypse. However, I preferred Sharlet's previous book, The Family: The Secret Fundamentalism at the Heart of American Power. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Sean | 3/15/2011

    " sharlett was much more aggressive in this book than in the family. seems to be a broader criticism of right wing politics that associates with evangelicalism. while some of it was thought provoking, sharlett needs a broader view of evangelicals in america. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anne | 1/28/2011

    " This is one of the most frightening books I've ever read. And I believe every word written. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chuck | 1/16/2011

    " 1. Great expose how religious certainty can stunt emotional maturity 2. Well evidenced argument for the contradictions Christianity invites when it seeks power 3. Sometimes the writing feels rushed and unclear "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sbberns | 12/6/2010

    " Fascinating and scary- sheds some very interesting light on current political issues and is fairly disturbing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Weemcnab | 11/27/2010

    " This book was quite informative but the information was so disturbing, at times, that I had to avoid reading it and slipping into a depression! The book dragged in moments but overall was eye-opening and I hope to read The Family, Sharlet's earlier book, soon. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Trin | 11/3/2010

    " Guess what was kind of a bummer? Finishing this on election day. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jim | 10/25/2010

    " A much more readable and even more chilling follow-up to The Family. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Colin | 10/24/2010

    " I would have rated this higher but it's a little too first person chatty for my liking. Still, the chapters on the fundamentalist Christian influence on the military and their strategy for the third world are terrifying. "

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