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Download Bondage of the Will Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Bondage of the Will (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Martin Luther
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (1,910 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Martin Luther Narrator: Nadia May Publisher: christianaudio.com Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: May 2009 ISBN:
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First published in 1525, Martin Luther's Bondage of the Will is acknowledged by theologians as one of the great masterpieces of the Reformation. It is Luther response to Desiderius Erasmus' Diatribe on Free Will, written in his direct and unique style, combining deep spirituality with humor. Luther writes powerfully about man's depravity and God's sovereignty. The crucial issue for Luther concerned what ability free will has, and to what degree it is subject to God's sovereignty. For Luther, this key issue of free will is directly connected to God's plan of salvation. Is man able to save himself, or is his salvation entirely a work of divine grace? This work is vital to understanding the primary doctrines of the Reformation and will long remain among the great theological classics of Christian history. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Daniel | 2/10/2014

    " Communicates the important doctrine of human depravity while blasting the Diatribe of Erasmus (quite entertaining at times). "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Claudiu Catuna | 1/31/2014

    " Great for understanding historical Protestant theology. A classic work on monergism in Salvation. Much of what Luther says, in response to Erasmus, is the same between Calvinism and Arminianism. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andralea | 1/30/2014

    " This book had a huge impact on my life in studying the views of Martin luther and his opponent Erasmas. It was my favorite literature book during school last year. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Stephen Willcox | 1/29/2014

    " This may be the single best book on the relationship of man's responsibilty and volition. Aside from providing several good chuckles, Luther does a great job illustrating the function and restrictions of man's will as a result of our sin nature. I highly recommend this book to you! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andre | 1/28/2014

    " A definite must read for Reformed and non-Reformed interested in interacting with the doctrine of soteriology. Luther interacts with Erasmus on whether man is totally depraved/radically corrupted or whether is totally depraved but still has the ability to respond to the Gospel without regeneration first happening. Luther does not handle Erasmus with kid gloves and addresses some of more commonly raised objections and scriptures used to buffet the doctrine of total depravity. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bob Ladwig | 1/26/2014

    " Classic work by Luther showing the need of regeneration before faith. Also really shows that Luther was more reformed in his soteriology than modern Lutherans. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christopher | 1/25/2014

    " Luther admitted he thought this was his best work and I am inclined to agree. In this response to Erasmus of Rotterdam he presents a compelling case for the exhaustive sovereignty of God over all of creation and particularly in electing and predestining those whom he saves, he also shows how this does not conflict with the idea that man is held responsible for his sin, addressing the same question Paul does in Romans 9, "How can [God] still blame us, if no one resists his will?" Luther's writing is sharp and especially entertaining at points where he chides his opponent. It is well worth a thorough read. Also, I recommend getting the Library of Christian Classics publication "Luther and Erasmus: Free Will and Salvation" and read Erasmus first since this is Luther's response to him and you can admire the slick and ascerbic wit of Erasmus to get a feeling for what kind of rhetorical opposition Luther was up against. I think it was a bad move on the part of the publisher of this particular edition to isolate Luther's reponse without giving Erasmus his 5 cents, that's only fair. Neverthless, Luther's response is so thorough as he re-states and handles each of Erasmus' arguments that it is capable of standing on its own. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ron Clark | 1/18/2014

    " One of my top five books of all time. No book has ever stretched my brain quite like this one. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Matt | 12/5/2013

    " Very smooth translation with British spelling. Preface is lacking in Lutheran understanding; leans Calvinist. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michael | 10/5/2013

    " Deeper understanding or our reformed theology "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Adam Clark | 8/19/2013

    " majorly affected my thinking when i was first introduced to the doctrines of grace. still one of the seminal texts on total depravity and worldview, in my opinion. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Matt Friedman | 7/24/2013

    " There are some shining, Christological moments, but the logic which Luther uses still strikes me as convoluted in places, and the tone is generally awful (e.g., anyone who disagrees with Luther's views on the subject couldn't possibly be a Christian). "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bob | 7/3/2013

    " Great concepts here...convinced me to forget about 'free will'. But, he's kinda a jerk, so I like him less although I like his ideas more. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christopher Porter | 12/15/2012

    " The answer to modernity's false account of freedom. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bryce Lee | 9/14/2012

    " Luther's exposition is devastating and insightful. An essential work for anyone weighing the issues of God's Sovereignty and man's free agency in salvation. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Daniel Alvers | 4/16/2012

    " Wow.... heavy stuff "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Steve | 12/5/2011

    " A bit difficult to follow as I'm not as familiar with the details of Erasmus' claims, but several very clear themes are easy to pick out. It's amazing that some of the issues Luther addresses are still plaguing the church today. Worth reading more than once. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alexb | 10/1/2011

    " Good insights from Luther. A tough read for me at times. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Max Benfer | 8/28/2011

    " Luther's battle with Erasmus is classic. Although Luther's tone may seem a bit too acerbic for some, I personally found him to be not only quite funny, but also a refreshing change from the myriad theologians today who drown the truth in a sea of niceness and "tolerance". "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Zeke Vas | 8/22/2011

    " Bad logic and exegesis on the free will argument. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Steve | 5/21/2011

    " A bit difficult to follow as I'm not as familiar with the details of Erasmus' claims, but several very clear themes are easy to pick out. It's amazing that some of the issues Luther addresses are still plaguing the church today. Worth reading more than once. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bob | 12/13/2010

    " Classic work by Luther showing the need of regeneration before faith. Also really shows that Luther was more reformed in his soteriology than modern Lutherans. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alexb | 8/30/2010

    " Good insights from Luther. A tough read for me at times. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bryce | 8/26/2010

    " Luther's exposition is devastating and insightful. An essential work for anyone weighing the issues of God's Sovereignty and man's free agency in salvation. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Zeke | 7/1/2010

    " Bad logic and exegesis on the free will argument. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michelle | 5/23/2010

    " Admittedly, I did not read the book cover to cover. However, the foreword in the front is very helpful in setting the stage for Luther's education and possible influences as well. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jeremiah | 2/18/2010

    " Excellent. Excellent. Excellent. Definitely "heavy-lifting" when it comes to theological reading, but this is Luther at his best and so relevant for today! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 LJh* | 1/24/2010

    " Monumental work on free will, salvation, and God. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Adam | 11/10/2009

    " majorly affected my thinking when i was first introduced to the doctrines of grace. still one of the seminal texts on total depravity and worldview, in my opinion. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Steve | 8/14/2009

    " A reformation classic. Don't miss it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Scott | 7/19/2009

    " One of my all time favorites. Luther's criticisms of Erasmus are frankly laugh- out -loud hilarious, but it is also the best book ever written on the will of man. "

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About the Author

Martin Luther (1483–1546) was a German scholar, priest, theologian, and religious reformer and is considered one of the chief figures in European history. Arguing that money couldn’t buy freedom from God’s punishment for one’s sins, he laid the foundation for Protestant Reformation and greatly influenced the fields of politics, religion, education, and economics through his work and writings.