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Download Blue Mars Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Blue Mars Audiobook, by Kim Stanley Robinson Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (8,681 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Kim Stanley Robinson Narrator: Richard Ferrone Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2002 ISBN: 9781436121194
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Acclaimed visionary author Kim Stanley Robinson is a Hugo and Nebula Award-winner. Blue Mars is the final volume in Robinson's seminal science fiction trilogy which began with Red Mars and continues with Green Mars. The once red and barren terrain of Mars is now green and rich with life--plant, animal, and human. But idyllic Mars is in a state of political upheaval, plagued by violent conflict between those who would keep the planet green and those who want to return it to a desert world. Meanwhile, across the void of space, old, tired Earth spins on its decaying axis. A natural disaster threatens to drown the already far too polluted and overcrowded planet. The people of Earth are getting desperate. Maybe desperate enough to wage interplanetary war for the chance to begin again. Blue Mars is a complex and completely enthralling saga--as convincing and lushly imagined a future as anyone has ever dreamed. Richard Ferrone narrates this sweeping epic with engaging personality and finesse. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Andrewcharles420 | 2/2/2014

    " I loved how far into the future this book got to go technologically, and you could feel the fun KSR had going there; Green might have been too technical, keeping all the advances plausible, and Red was more about the journey than the details--though that kept its developments looking possible and hopefully even likely. I loved the culture of the Martians, and generally all of the space-faring societies (which is to say, Earth's old ways looked pretty shabby); their acceptance of personal choices, new ideas, new ways of doing things, and even their general pursuits toward happiness really seemed ideal. Do I have to move to Del Mar beach for life to be so generous now? I really missed John Boone in this book, but I loved Ann's metamorphosis, and Sax showed a surprising amount of personal growth throughout the series (which had always been good, I liked who he began as, and I liked how he was at the story's ending). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Hillary | 1/15/2014

    " Second in the trilogy. Loved this one as well. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Val Schuman | 1/10/2014

    " Boring. Very long and doesn't seem to be about anything in particular. With a few exceptions, nothing's happening. In truth, I couldn't get through the whole book, only read the first 30%, which took me a while. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bill | 1/7/2014

    " 3rd of a trilogy. Start at Red Mars. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Molly | 1/4/2014

    " I like Sax the best, but I was pretty bored with the series by the end of it. I only finished this book because I already had 1800 pages behind me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Shi-Hsia | 1/4/2014

    " Robinson really shouldn't have written a third book, this it just an unnecessary drag. And I don't find it convincing that in a SINGLE CENTURY, within the extended lifetime of the first settlers, you could terraform Mars enough to create an ecosystem capable of supporting polar bears. Remember, they're apex predators. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mark Noce | 11/7/2013

    " A great end to the Mars trilogy, and definitely worth the read and journey. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Stan Pedzick | 7/28/2013

    " The end of the KSR books with unlikeable characters doing really stupid things, but you keep reading despite of this because you want to know where the story goes. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nick | 7/16/2013

    " Get your ass to Mars. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ian Clotworthy | 5/11/2013

    " The Mars Trilogy is really a great analogy to the NCAD experience. You get older, surrounded by increasing numbers of petulant newcomers. You sadly lose frequent contact with your friends in other departments. You were like the first hundred and sixty, hermetically sealed in core back in the day. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Darren | 5/7/2013

    " Could be the finale to my favorite scifi series ever. So believable; every page was much less fantasy than history written too soon. Makes me anxious for the inevitable reality of humans living on a terraformed mars. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Judy | 5/24/2012

    " This series ruined me for anybody else's Mars books. I feel like I've been there, lived there, etc. No one else makes a place so real. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Philip | 1/1/2012

    " A very disjointed narrative that reads more like a collection of short stories about the same theme. Some of these sections are stunning in setting and concepts, while others are tedious and forgettable, and all the while the characters are not fleshed out and only exist to play their roles. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Miles | 11/30/2011

    " Great series. Delves equally deeply into constitutional politics as science. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 John | 10/23/2011

    " One of the great SF series of all time! I agree with Arthur C. Clarke when he said, "It should be required reading for the colonists of the next century." Rarely has a colonization story been realized with such realism - of personalities, of politics, of culture, and of science. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Susan | 10/4/2011

    " seems this series has devolved from hard science into describing deviant sexual practices. boring. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gordon | 9/16/2011

    " Dragged in places but worth reading anyway "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kdirewolf | 5/9/2011

    " Red Mars, Green Mars, and Blue Mars make more of a Russian novel than an SF trilogy. I liked Red Mars best, though was disappointed with how Phobos "fell." Good books, all. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sardonyx | 4/20/2011

    " I loved this so much!! It was a tougher read than the rest of them. So much more detailed descriptions of landscape and such. A lot of depressing subject matter as well. But a satisfying ending! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mark | 4/8/2011

    " Sorry, Mr Robinson lost me in this series. Yawn. I began to daydream while reading some paragraphs. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bicefalus | 2/2/2011

    " la colonizzazione di marte è finita il pianeta è diventato blu e i coloni continuano la loro lotta per dominar eil pianeta e per dare la giusta rotta con la grande madre terra ..
    la visione del futuro di robinson ci da tanti tantissimi spunti di rilfessione "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ian | 1/9/2011

    " All three are wonderful books that examine the nature of relationships and the conflicts between capitalism and preserving the environment. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Anna | 12/5/2010

    " I hope to write a complete review soon -- but really, the full Mars trilogy is one of the best things I've read in many, many years. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Charlotte | 8/19/2010

    " Never finished this one - found the people got tiresome. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ryan | 7/17/2010

    " I feel like the trilogy could best have been served as only a sequel. There was no need for extending the books to make three. There were parts of the first two that could have been removed and consolidate the few important plot developments from the third to the end of the second. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Susan | 7/3/2010

    " seems this series has devolved from hard science into describing deviant sexual practices. boring. "

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About the Author
Author Kim Stanley RobinsonKim Stanley Robinson is a New York Times bestseller and winner of the Hugo, Nebula, and Locus awards. He is the author of more than twenty books, including the bestselling Mars trilogy and the critically acclaimed Forty Signs of Rain, The Years of Rice and Salt and 2312. In 2008, he was named a "Hero of the Environment" by Time magazine, and he works with the Sierra Nevada Research Institute. He lives in Davis, California.
About the Narrator

Richard Ferrone, an Audie Award winner, has consistently received high praise from critics and fans alike for his audiobook performances for over twenty years. He has performed on and off Broadway and in regional theaters. His television appearances include Law & Order, Against the Law, Guiding Light, and One Life to Live.