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2.8 out of 52.8 out of 52.8 out of 52.8 out of 52.8 out of 5 2.80 (30 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Aravind Adiga Narrator: Harsh Nayyar Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: June 2009 ISBN: 9780743597210
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From the New York Times-bestselling winner of the Man Booker Prize 2008 -- a powerful and striking new collection

Welcome to Kittur, India. Of its 193,432 residents, only 89 declare themselves to be without religion or caste. And if the characters in Between the Assassinations are any indication, Kittur is an extraordinary crossroads of the brightest minds and the poorest morals, the up-and-coming and the downtrodden, and of an India that modern literature has rarely addressed.

A twelve-year-old boy named Ziauddin, a gofer at a tea shop near the railway station, is enticed into wrongdoing because a fair-skinned stranger treats him with dignity and warmth. George D'Souza, a mosquito-repellent sprayer, elevates himself to gardener and then chauffeur to the lovely, young Mrs. Gomes, and then loses it all when he attempts to be something more. A little girl's first act of love for her father is to beg on the street for money to support his drug habit. A privileged schoolboy sets off an explosive in a Jesuit-school classroom in protest against casteism. And the loneliest member of the Marxist-Maoist Party of India falls in love with the one young woman, in the poorest part of town, whom he cannot afford to wed.

A blinding, brilliant, and brave mosaic of Indian life as it is lived in a place called Kittur, Between the Assassinations, with all the humor, sympathy, and unflinching candor of The White Tiger, showcases the most beloved aspects of Aravind Adiga's writing to brilliant effect and enlarges our understanding of the world we live in today. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • Between the Assassinations shows that Adiga...is one of the most important voices to emerge from India in recent years. The Guardian (London)
  • “Further proves his talents for observation and pinpointing the complexity of modern India…Adiga blends pure and profane into a marvelous journey through Kittur, a city as indomitable and complex as India itself.”

    San Francisco Chronicle

  • “Teeming with life…It’s a gruesome picture of existence, and the small epiphanies hit like bricks from heaven.”

    Publishers Weekly (starred review)

  • “Recalls fairy tales and folk parables…These provocative tales suggest that fiction illuminates truths beyond the reach of journalism.”

    Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

  • “Harsh Nayyar’s voice is as flexible as this narrative on modern life in India…He manages to keep up with the ambitious novel, which shifts continually as the story embraces an extended cast of characters and time frames, including nostalgic glances backward to the era of Gandhi and the Indian independence movement.”

    AudioFile

  • “The stories are sharply tactile, and the city of Kittur is richly imagined. Once again, Adiga offers a panoramic view of India, this time by giving voices and names to the multitude.”

    Booklist

  • “Adiga captures the lives of the poor and powerless, doomed to hopelessness and sometimes rage…A stunning work; highly recommended.”

    Library Journal

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Anselm Paul | 2/19/2014

    " Aravind Ardiga describes this town of Kittur so well that I thought it really existed. What a brilliant writer he is! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Dina | 2/10/2014

    " Started reading it last fall, stopped on page 109. Finally picked it back up last week and finished it. I'm so glad to be done with it. The White Tiger was so much better. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jen | 2/9/2014

    " This was a harsh book. I don't mind that, but there was no apparent moral or purpose for all of the stories, which kind of bugs me. It was a series of short stories centered around one town, but the stories felt disconnected. I preferred his other book; I think it was "The White Tiger." "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Zahreen | 2/9/2014

    " I was kind of disappointed, because this author won the Booker Prize last year, but this book wasn't nearly as good as I thought it would be. Of course, I haven't read "The White Tiger" and I am sure that will be more representative of his writing. This book was a definite sophomore slump though. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Krista | 2/2/2014

    " Intriguing, interwoven glimpses into life in a fictitious Indian city. Not always uplifting, but fascinating characters and wonderful, vivid imagery. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Laura Hutchinson | 1/30/2014

    " This book is quite an interesting way to set out a book. I enjoyed the authors style of writing as usual and it was interesting to read about life between the two assassinations of these two political figures in India. It was quite despressing, as was his previous book, to think that life in India was like this. I don't think this book flowed very well, although I dout that was the intention. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Veena | 1/27/2014

    " Loved it. Even more than White Tiger. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 James Purkis Purkis | 1/22/2014

    " I really wanted to enjoy this book. I kept reading it despite my misgivings about the structure and was ultimately left disappointed. After the minutiae and intrigue of "The White Tiger", I was expecting another unique Indian tale of poverty and betrayal. Instead, this book provides a series of vignettes that are well written in their own way but lack the depth that made his previous work so engrossing. The last story, of the 55 year old Communist, is a great example: compelling setting, a complex main character but the love story is so rushed that it didn't have time to develop in a satisfactory manner. While the theme of the poor being down trodden by the middle and upper class is common to all stories, this is not enough to keep the whole thing as coherent as it needed to be. Not sure jI will read his next book after this experience. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lindsay | 1/15/2014

    " I liked this and if you've read Adiga's other novels, you'll like it too. A look at the Indian caste system in the 1980s through many different characters living in the same city. Since each character(s) comprises a chapter, it almost reads as a series of linked short stories. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Mugdha | 1/6/2014

    " Disappointing after The White Tiger. The format is not great...and too many graphic descriptions for my liking. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Audrey | 11/15/2013

    " This is the unabridged audiobook. This was a very interesting collection of short stories, I enjoyed the author's book; "White Tiger" much better, but I did like these stories. The narrator was perfect for the reading of this book. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Samir Dhond | 11/10/2013

    " I found the book average. As compared to his first book whihc one the prize, The White Tiger, I found it to be of the same style and Genre. I hope he does not go the Arundhati Roy way. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Isabella | 11/5/2013

    " Not being much of a fan of the short story format I did not enjoy this near as much as The White Tiger. In the end, it took me forever to get through. An ok read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lesandre | 8/21/2013

    " Loved the vignettes of Kittur; sort of wished they had all interwoven to a plot. Still enjoyed it more than "The White Tiger". Eagerly anticipating Adiga's next book. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Amitha Pai | 6/25/2013

    " It is the story of characters in a small coastal Indian town.... depiction is just ok... nothing great "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gavin Greenwood | 5/4/2013

    " A good read if one wants a clear, unedited and brutally honest insight into the daily life of a typical everywhere Indian village. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 PGLaw3 Gibbs | 3/7/2013

    " Another difficult-to-read novel, this one is told in short stories. The characters range from the comfortably rich to the unimaginably dirt poor, and every one of them struggles with morality, temptation, frustration and oppression often of their own making. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Shylashree Chikkamuniyappa | 12/6/2012

    " It was the story of bunch of people in a place in Karnataka......writing was interesting initially but the characters really did not have an ending which was incomplete for me to enjoy "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Niki | 11/1/2012

    " Fantastic, better than White Tiger, but read White Tiger first anyway. This guy loves India and is so critical of India. Not a minute reading this book is wasted. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Paul Miller | 5/22/2012

    " Really enjoyed the series of shot stories portraying Indian life from lots of different angles. The author is very good at painting day-to- day life for the poorest in India. Insightful as well as enjoyable and made me want to re-read "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Abi | 5/4/2012

    " not as good as the white tiger. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Judi | 6/11/2011

    " I loved the style of self-contained short stories. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kailin | 6/7/2011

    " I feel that I learn more about the human condition and spirit each time I read a book about India. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mona | 6/4/2011

    " I have never been a fan of short stories. I like to go on a journey with a character and you just cant do that in so few pages. These stories were interesting, however, so I stayed with the book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jill | 6/2/2011

    " (audiobook) A series of short stories about the town of Kittur, India, which really exists (western Karnataka). I liked this much better than White Tiger, but you can definitely see some similar themes running through it. I would like to know if Rocky and Mayur have ever eaten there on Hwy 56. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Michele | 4/7/2011

    " Just too depressing after the first few stories. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 PGLaw3 | 3/23/2011

    " Another difficult-to-read novel, this one is told in short stories. The characters range from the comfortably rich to the unimaginably dirt poor, and every one of them struggles with morality, temptation, frustration and oppression often of their own making. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Andrew | 3/22/2011

    " Loved the white tiger - bought this hoping for similar.
    Very disappointed - drawn out short stories of hardship - could not see the point at all.

    My advice read something else. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Yvonne | 2/13/2011

    " would have enjoyed more as one fluid story rather than unrelated snapshots of this place during that time "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jennifer | 2/8/2011

    " Not as good as White Tiger. More a collection of small stories that didn't come together at the end, seemed almost unfinished. A bit disappointing really "

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About the Author
Author Aravind Adiga

Aravind Adiga was born in India in 1974 and attended Columbia and Oxford universities. He is the author of Selection Day, the Booker Prize-winning novel The White Tiger, and the story collection Between the Assassinations.

About the Narrator

Harsh Nayyar is a television and film actor, most notably appearing in Boston Legal and Hidalgo.