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Download Augustus: The Life of Rome's First Emperor Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Augustus: The Life of Romes First Emperor (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Anthony Everitt
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,745 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Anthony Everitt Narrator: John Curless Publisher: Recorded Books Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: February 2007 ISBN:
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Historian Anthony Everitt earned widespread critical acclaim for his best-selling biography of Cicero. Now, with Augustus, he delivers his second spellbinding account of a Roman icon whose legacy has echoed through the ages.

Caesar Augustus has been called history's greatest emperor. It was said he found Rome made of clay and left it made of marble. With a senator for a father and Julius Caesar for a great-uncle, he ascended the ranks of Roman society with breathtaking speed. His courage in battle is still questioned, yet his political savvy was second to none. He had a lifelong rival in Mark Antony and a 51-year companion in his wife, Livia. And his influence extended perhaps further than that of any ruler who has ever lived.

Drawing on the available information, while making a handful of his own groundbreaking assertions, Everitt brings the real Augustus to vivid life in this fascinating narrative.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sjo | 2/13/2014

    " Anthony Everitt is a terrific biographer--this is a very balanced, real portrayal of Augustus, and the history of the period. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jennifer | 2/9/2014

    " I was in the mood for some history, and this was the perfect read. It took me awhile to finish it, but it was good. Augustus was an interesting person. Ever since watching the HBO TV series, "Rome" and visiting the IMA Roman Exhibit from The Louvre, I have wanted to read this. (My boyfriend read it first and loved it!) Augustus was incredibly powerful, yet MEAN. He definitely had his moments of rage. Interesting tidbit was that Livia may have poisoned him at his death. Very good! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Seanna | 2/7/2014

    " Well written and engaging. Does a great job of telling the story of such an amazing life. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 C.E. | 2/1/2014

    " Readable but dull. No new info or insight, doesn't even try to reconcile aspects of Augustus' character with his actions. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Charles Ames | 1/15/2014

    " Anthony Everitt's style is anything but dry; this biography reads like good historical fiction. Two things come across clearly: first, Augustus was a master administrator and politician rather than a warrior. The prospect of battle made him ill, and if not for his long-time friend Agrippa, a brilliant military commander and indispensable deputy, he probably would not have outlasted Antony to become emperor. Second, although technologies and cultural norms make Rome seem alien us, human nature hasn't changed a bit. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Brandon Schultz | 1/13/2014

    " A smooth presentation of a powerful history and fascinating biographical material. Everitt is a master biographer for the masses and valuable to the scholar as well. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bill Crew | 1/4/2014

    " Great book; good for someone without much Roman history background. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Michelle | 12/30/2013

    " Not intriguing enough to read for pleasure, but very academic for papers. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John Kelley | 12/27/2013

    " This was a comprehensive study of Caesar Augustus and probably the best I've read of the lives of individual emperors. He did keep the empire together and gave it stability when it needed stability "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Serafina | 12/20/2013

    " I learned that Augustus was the first person (so they say) to use the word I. He began to reflect on his behavior and used the I making literature personal. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gordon | 12/16/2013

    " A fascinating tale of Rome's first and longest serving emperor. The history of Gayus Octavius Ceaser Augustus is incredible in its detail and concentration of interesting facts that reveal so much of the background of modern Europe, the culture and landscape of modern Italy and southern Europe. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michael | 12/11/2013

    " An extraordinary life, lived in extraordinary times. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michael | 8/21/2013

    " Very good history of Augustus Caesar's life, rise to power, and reign. I especially liked the first couple of chapters, which did an excellent job of laying out the context of Roman life and Julius Caesar's rise to power, which shaped the world that Augustus entered. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Converse | 7/14/2013

    " How Gaius Octavius clawed his way to the top, stayed there, and re-made the remains of an oligarchic republic into a more stable monarchy "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Terri | 2/20/2013

    " I keep falling asleep before I make any progress. Either I am extra sleepy lately or this book is a little boring. I like the information though. It is thorough for a popular history book, but with that pleasant feature of popular history called speculation. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 John | 1/17/2013

    " A good biography and very interesting history of Rome beginning with the civil wars which ended the republic and then the creation of the empire by Augustus. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Briapedia | 10/14/2012

    " Not as strong as Cicero, but still very interesting. Maybe its just that Augustus isn't nearly as likable as Cicero. Fun note: This was the first time I've ever anxiously awaited the release of a history book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Brook Miscoski | 8/14/2012

    " This book is informative and entertaining, but Everitt is not a good historian, and he offers his opinion as if it were fact quite frequently. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Monica Perez | 4/14/2012

    " A good read but riddled with speculation for the purpose of a more seamless and exciting narrative. It seems like it wasn't written by a historian and, in fact, it wasn't. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chris Faulkner | 2/13/2012

    " Fantastic read on the man who set much of the course for the latter Roman Empire and the beginnings of Europe. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Paul Pellicci | 1/26/2012

    " Everitt made this a very interesting book. I am a Cicero fan and he had him killed along with thousands of others, but I liked him in this book. I liked how he ran his empire and his end came, poisoned with love. Love of Augustus and love of the empire. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Travis Gottschutzke | 1/9/2012

    " Nothing spectaculalrly different form what I already knew of Augustus, although Everitt did inject some personable, social history into the mix which made for a good read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 aizjanika | 12/11/2011

    " This book tells the story of Augustus from his childhood to his death. By the time I finished reading, I felt like I knew more about him and the time period, even though this is one of my favorite periods of history. It was a very enjoyable read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Aizjanika | 6/27/2011

    " This book tells the story of Augustus from his childhood to his death. By the time I finished reading, I felt like I knew more about him and the time period, even though this is one of my favorite periods of history. It was a very enjoyable read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Doug | 2/17/2011

    " This is a terrifically readable biography. It also incorporates a great deal of information about contemporary Roman culture, which made the book even more enjoyable. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Michael | 2/14/2011

    " I enjoyed this book. It was interesting to learn about some of the intricate politics involved in the evolution of Rome during this period. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sjo | 2/6/2011

    " Anthony Everitt is a terrific biographer--this is a very balanced, real portrayal of Augustus, and the history of the period. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Call Me | 1/13/2011

    " ISBN-10: 0812970586


    These are the last two of Everitt’s trilogy. Hadrian is the other. Well written history in all cases. All three of these individuals, especially Cicero, affected western thought long past the empire. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bill | 10/30/2010

    " Great book; good for someone without much Roman history background. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kathleen | 9/12/2010

    " The amount of detail with some of the battles was a bit tedious and some of the book I found a bit repetitive, but overall I liked it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Travis | 9/4/2010

    " Nothing spectaculalrly different form what I already knew of Augustus, although Everitt did inject some personable, social history into the mix which made for a good read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tom | 9/1/2010

    " A great history of Rome's critical period at the end of the Roman Republlic and the start of the Empire. The effect of Julius' crossing the Rubicon, and entering Rome proper with weapons. The governance and the culture.

    I went with the audio version - this version was very well read. "

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About the Author
Author Anthony Everitt

Anthony Everitt, visiting professor in the visual and performing arts at Nottingham Trent University, has written extensively on European culture and is the author of Cicero and Augustus. He has served as secretary general of the Arts Council of Great Britain. He lives near Colchester, England’s first recorded town, founded by the Romans.

About the Narrator

John Curless is a theater, film, and television actor. He has appeared on Broadway in Journeys End, The Sound of Music, and The King and I and off-Broadway in Passion Play, Comic Potential, and The Entertainer. His film and television credits include Vibrations, Ed, and NYPD Blue. His audiobook narrations have been awarded two AudioFile Earphones Awards.