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Download Aristotle: On Poetry Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Aristotle: On Poetry (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Aristotle
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (5,201 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Aristotle Narrator: Robin Field Publisher: Mission Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2010 ISBN:
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Aristotle's Poetics is the earliest-surviving work of dramatic theory and the first fully intact philosophical treatise to focus on literary theory. In it, the respected Greek sage offers an account of what he calls poetry (which the Greeks understood to literally mean making), examining its first principles and identifying its genres and basic elements, including what he terms drama-comedy, tragedy, and the satyr play - as well as lyric poetry, epic poetry, and iambic pentameter, which he always associates with wit.

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ariel | 2/11/2014

    " I finally read this classic theoretical text for my grad school reading list. I'm glad I read it since now I'm more impressive to elitists, Aristotle wasn't exactly engaging because it was so decontextualized. I was just plopped down in this discussion and had no idea what he was responding to, besides Oedipus and the Odyssey and Iliad because I kind of know those texts, because Aristotle just assumes you're up on all the plays he's quoting. It's cool to see someone theorizing about a literary text a millennium ago, though, especially since all the cool people have read Poetics. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Seth | 2/3/2014

    " We got all our categories of fiction analysis from this little handbook it turns out. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Xavier | 1/17/2014

    " It's a taxing read, but somehow recommended to screenwriting students. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Daniel Gardina | 1/15/2014

    " Hands down, this is the best resource on dramatic storytelling. Read it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amy | 1/6/2014

    " Because I am teaching a class on the history of theater, because Aristotle's Poetics has been referred to in so many classes I have taken before, and because this is the first work of literary criticism ever written, I thought I needed to go to the source and read it at last. I'm not sure if all the summaries and interpretations I have heard over the years were necessary. Poetics is brief and not an extremely challenging read. Aristotle's influence on the history of theater and on literary criticism was huge, and I am glad I now read his ideas in his own (albeit translated) words. Anyone with a love for literature and theater should give it a perusal at least once in their lifetime. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sara | 12/20/2013

    " 3.5. I appreciate the worth of it, but just couldn't fully read it in context. The introduction to this edition is particularly note-worthy. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marts (Thinker) | 12/10/2013

    " Aristotle's work describing poetry's origins and literature's laws. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tommy Butler | 12/10/2013

    " A classic, so of course it's dry, and subject to misinterpretation unless you can read the original Greek and lived in Greece over 2,000 years ago. Don't read this for pleasure, but I found it valuable to see where some critical components of modern story theory come from, and the long introduction is very helpful in understanding the translation of the text itself. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Pernille | 10/20/2013

    " If you are studying literary history you have to read this book. It is the first book that define the concept of genre in literature (drama). The language is simple and Aristoteles is easy to follow. It is a very good companion to ancient Greek and Roman comedies and tragedies. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Barb | 10/5/2013

    " Not the right edition, but G1 reading list "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bryan | 10/2/2013

    " A wonderful foundation for storytelling. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shawn | 10/1/2013

    " Still [trenchant] after all these years. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Dev | 4/3/2013

    " Not an easy read, but a thorough look will give up a lot of insight into the way writing works and demonstrate the genius of Aristotle. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Whitney | 1/10/2013

    " I don't like giving stars to Aristotle. That's stupid. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gary Mesick | 12/8/2012

    " While this one may not make you laugh, cry or become a part of you, it will explain why everything else does. This is one worth owning and returning to, over and over again (as with much of the rest of Aristotle). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Norbert | 10/20/2012

    " Cannot agree with it completely, but cannot write a better one myself. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tobias | 7/23/2012

    " After spending months swimming in the depths of Aristotle's Metaphysics, reading this had a strange (but fun) effect. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bill Kerwin | 6/18/2012

    " If you want to learn about tragedy--or narrative in general--this is still the best place to start. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jenny | 5/7/2012

    " for what aristotle thought made a harmonious play--applicable for movies, too. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andrew Cutler | 5/4/2012

    " Unfortunately this text historically lacks Aristotle's commentaries on comedy: the 'lost text' is the inspiration for Umberto Eco's 'In the Name of the Rose.' "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 P. | 4/2/2012

    " A must read for every writer and classicly concerned reader. Why? He defined all the terms. You read it here first. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Drew Hoffman | 3/11/2012

    " "Poetics" describes the rules to writing great epics and tragedies. Far be it for me to argue with Aristotle but I think the best poetry writing today is decidely rule-breaking in nature. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Josh | 12/10/2011

    " This is a really good read. Excellent recommendation from Lew Hunter (Screenwriting Guru). "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Matt Schwabauer | 10/18/2011

    " An interesting and elemental dissertation on poetry and it's elements. A little dry, but Aristotle was on the right track. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ilham Sagueb | 9/10/2011

    " even if I dont think that there should be that much unity and restrictions in tragedy to reflect itself,the way of purification which is explained by catharsis is perfect observation about people and how they react. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Fushigifox | 8/18/2011

    " Truly a remarkable book, first read it in my drama class during College and now often refer to it while reading any genre. Really helps in opening the mind to how stories are brought together. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kate | 5/2/2011

    " What makes a good story, analysis of various ways of constructing story, it would help if we all grasped language of story construction in terms of literary terms used. A good book from a very versatile Philosopher. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sarah | 5/2/2011

    " I read this in a college class on aesthetics. I think it's a mandatory read for anyone who wants a shot and not sounding like a total dolt in a discussion about art and it gives a big leg up in understanding artistic references in literature. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shelley | 4/7/2011

    " Oh, how I wish my college English professors had assigned this instead of Steve Abee's The Bus: Cosmic Ejaculations of The Daily Mind in Transit.

    Thanks a lot, Progressive Education... "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Melissa | 3/28/2011

    " BLAAAAAAAAAAAAAARGH. This ruined many a poor Frenchmen's writing career in the era of the Sun King. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tia | 2/26/2011

    " I didn't think I'd enjoy Artistotle's ideas as much as I did. Arguments were clear, really liked the translation, wish I had read this sooner, but glad I now own it! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Matt | 2/15/2011

    " Required reading as background for Exegesis of Acts. Aristotle contrasts poetry with history - "Poetry, therefore, is a more philosophical and higher thing than history: for poetry tends to express the universal, history the particular." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christopher | 2/9/2011

    " The best thing I've ever read on the structure of drama. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Melanie | 1/14/2011

    " An excellent translation, but the reconstruction of Poetics II made me nervous. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elizabeth Moon | 12/10/2010

    " Foundation reading. For a writer, Aristotle's POETICS is critically important, whether as playwright or prose fiction writer. As with all my foundation reading, it's something I re-read over the years. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Greg | 11/22/2010

    " Simply put, this made me realize I should have read this a long, long time ago. "

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About the Author
Author Aristotle

Aristotle (384–322 BC) was a Greek philosopher, scientist, and physician. As a young man, he became a student under Plato in Athens. In 342, he became the tutor of young Alexander the Great in Macedonia. After that, Aristotle returned to Athens to establish his own school and research institute, the Lyceum. His writings have profoundly affected the whole course of philosophy, from ancient times to the present.

About the Narrator

Robin Field is the AudioFile Earphones Award–winning narrator of numerous audiobooks, as well as an award-winning actor, singer, writer, and lyricist whose career has spanned six decades. He has starred on and off Broadway, headlined at Carnegie Hall, authored numerous musical reviews, and hosted or performed on a number of television and radio programs over the years.