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Download Appetite for Self-Destruction: The Spectacular Crash of the Record Industry in the Digital Age Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Appetite for Self-Destruction: The Spectacular Crash of the Record Industry in the Digital Age (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Steve Knopper
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (452 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Steve Knopper Narrator: Dan John Miller Publisher: Brilliance Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 2008 ISBN:
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For the first time, Appetite for Self-Destruction recounts the story of the precipitous rise and fall of the recording industry over the past three decades, when the incredible success of the CD turned the music business into one of the most glamorous, high-profile industries in the world - and the advent of file sharing brought it to its knees.

In a comprehensive, fast-paced account full of larger-than-life personalities, Rolling Stone contributing editor Steve Knopper shows that, after the incredible wealth and excess of the '80s and '90s, Sony, Warner, and the other big players brought about their own downfall through years of denial and bad decisions in the face of dramatic advances in technology.

Based on interviews with more than 200 music industry sources - from Warner Music chairman Edgar Bronfman Jr. to renegade Napster creator Shawn Fanning - Knopper is the first to offer such a detailed and sweeping contemporary history of the industry's wild ride through the past three decades.

From the birth of the compact disc, through the explosion of CD sales in the '80s and '90s, the emergence of Napster, and the secret talks that led to iTunes, to the current collapse of the industry as CD sales plummet, Knopper takes us inside the boardrooms, recording studios, private estates, garage computer labs, company jets, corporate infighting, and secret deals of the big names and behind-the-scenes players who made it all happen. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Devin | 2/13/2014

    " Very well researched and with a great narrative. It really shows the whole ship going down. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 John | 1/22/2014

    " I read part of this book to support a paper I had to write for school. The paper was about selling music on-line, and this book has some good information about the major record labels disdain for the idea of selling music on-line instead of in the format of a CD. I decided to finish reading the book to get a full picture of what the author was describing, and I found the whole story fairly interesting. It is sort of amusing how people who a wonderfully successful at something can get stuck in a position and have no way to get themselves on to a new idea. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Matt | 1/15/2014

    " Provides a compelling argument that, every time a technological advancement came forward, the record industry did what it could to kill or ignore it. I knew that they shot themselves in the foot with the transition to digital, but it seems they were unaware of the gun. And maybe the foot too. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Paulisded | 12/28/2013

    " Finally, somebody has the balls to tell the real reasons why the record business is dying. Yes, downloading is one of the reasons, but as Knopper reports, if record companies had worked WITH Napster they could have had a working model for online sales before the majority of consumers even realized they could download material. Knopper also talks about the over-reliance on the $16 CD, the over-spending on trends that were destined to die, and the move from music people running the industry to marketing men who had no clue how to deal with an artistic product. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Andy | 11/25/2013

    " An interesting journey through the record industry's arrogant missteps as they tried to both maintain the status quo, milk the fat profits of the CD-ROM revolution, and get completely blindsided by peer-to-peer file sharing. The book itself is well-researched but lacks an overall cohesiveness, tending to bounce among topics e.g music genres, studios and their respective executives, payola, recording artists (a lot on 'Boy Bands') and so on while still attempting to follow a general time line. To the author's credit, a lot of the material was gleaned through sources other than direct interviews. Not many were willing to grant interviews. And those that did grant interviews tended to recall events in that indulged their egos... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mark | 11/23/2013

    " I was born in 1976, and my older brother started DJing in 1983. It was fun, and frustrating, to read about everything that affected music during this crazy Disco to Digital era. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mhrlibrary | 11/16/2013

    " This book has a ton of great historical information on the record industry and how it evolved into the CD Age and collapsed with the digital piracy and major label greed. Very dry. It did not hold my attention well. This is what happens when you read a lot of true crime and mystery/suspense novels. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jess Mortensen | 10/21/2013

    " Very interesting. I learned a lot of surprising facts about music in our digital age. Plus it is a well-told story that held my attention. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chris | 8/3/2013

    " Chronicles all the really stupid things the recording industry started doing beginning with the disco era, which is coincidentally around the same time that I started losing interest in the music scene. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 ccccurt Heimbuck | 7/22/2013

    " I more skimmed this book than read it. A lot of gossip about all of the players involved. And I just don't care about Tommy Mottola and Mariah Carey. Some chapters were interesting, but I thought this would focus more on the future of the record industry. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 G | 7/2/2013

    " Super sad - but that's what you get when you refuse to change... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kaila | 2/15/2013

    " This book confirms that while the major record labels are dying a fast death in the digital age, the music business can thrive. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 solidad | 9/21/2012

    " A quick and highly informative read -- I especially found the latter half useful for sorting though the falling rubble of what was the record business. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jim Turner | 5/30/2012

    " Excellent overview of how the record industry spectacularly failed to deal with the internet download phenomenon, and ultimately let Steve Jobs pick up their ball and run with it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jason Bilsky | 2/25/2012

    " A good analysis of the failings of the modern record industry, but unfortunately, we're in such a huge time of flux that the book would need to be updated every 6 months in order to remain current. An excellent candidate for an auto-updating e-book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Meg | 12/18/2011

    " Finally getting to this... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Derrick | 9/29/2011

    " Great read for anyone connected to the music industry. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Meowbie | 7/10/2009

    " Interesting read about the reluctance of the record industry to adapt to the changing digital realities of the past three decades. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sophie | 5/3/2009

    " Great overview. Would be interesting to get a new edition canvassing the emergence of Spotify/Pandora etc etc. (Was written in 2009). "

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About the Author

Steve Knopper is a contributing editor to Rolling Stone and veteran music reporter who has written for the New York Times Magazine, GQ, the Wall Street Journal, Wired, Details, and many other publications.

About the Narrator

Dan John Miller is an American actor and musician. In the Oscar-winning Walk the Line, he starred as Johnny Cash’s guitarist and best friend, Luther Perkins, and has also appeared in George Clooney’s Leatherheads and My One and Only, with Renée Zellweger. An award-winning audiobook narrator, he has garnered multiple Audie Award nominations, has twice been named a Best Voice by AudioFile magazine, and has received eight AudioFile Earphones Awards and a Listen-Up Award from Publishers Weekly.