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Download All Things Shining: Reading the Western Classics to Find Meaning in a Secular Age Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample All Things Shining: Reading the Western Classics to Find Meaning in a Secular Age Audiobook, by Hubert Dreyfus Click for printable size audiobook cover
3.29 out of 53.29 out of 53.29 out of 53.29 out of 53.29 out of 5 3.29 (21 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Hubert Dreyfus, Sean Dorrance Kelly Narrator: David Drummond Publisher: Highbridge Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: April 2011 ISBN: 9781611744538
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A wide-ranging look at the loss of meaning in the West, and a guide for how to retrieve it. Two renowned philosophy professors draw from several Western literary classics to show a new <#150> and very old <#150> way to celebrate and be grateful for our Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Aimee | 2/20/2014

    " If you have to use post-it flags to read a book, it better be for school, or some crazy punishment. Sigh. Too hard for August. bit.ly/PHgOU0 "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Peter | 2/20/2014

    " Ever wondered why so many people in our modern western world look to other cultures to find meaning? Why does the west struggle with this? This is the book for you if you want to find meaning without yoga, jesus or buddha. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Richard Roberts | 2/14/2014

    " An enlightening book about recapturing the "sacred" in a western culture which moving decidedly away from it. I enjoyed the historical aspects, the writings of Homer, Dante, Melville and the analysis of their works as they relate to their times. I may have to go and read "Moby Dick" now. I'm not sure what to make of the authors conclusions regarding the subject matter. I would recommend this book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Eric Fought | 2/13/2014

    " An interesting philosophical perspective on today's search for meaning. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bob Cardenas | 2/3/2014

    " In it we hear that what is new in our times is the lack of guidance amid a plethora of choice. The Gods, or belief in a God, is what took care of individual's decisions in life and that in today's society we are on our own, free will is at the cafeteria and the lunch lady of the past is not doling out what we consume anymore. Hey, what do you know, we have to be adult, be mature, take responsibility for our choices. Ahab was a zealot, who could avoid choice, his self assurance precluded reasoning. Dante's Hell was for people that lived outside the scope of worship, not for sinners. Christ's way or the Highway to Hell. The literary topics are a gem to read, so far. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 marcali | 1/16/2014

    " fun, meandering read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Michael Grasso | 9/19/2013

    " This is my airplane reading. Which means, inevitably, I'll finish it before we even get to the airport. A look at literature (including such disparate authors as Dante, Melville, D.F. Wallace, and Descartes) as a guiding moral force in a secular age. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Skyla | 9/6/2013

    " Started off well, but in my opinion the authors became too entranced with their writing and lost the story. Once they settled into Moby Dick as an example, they lost the storyline and they lost me. Not as good a read as I hoped. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Haley | 7/4/2013

    " Great book. Not sure I agree with all the precepts set forth, but I loved having so much food for thought. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Derek | 3/7/2013

    " Deep, questions the meaning of life, our relationship to God (and the gods) through the written history through literature from Homer to Melville. Moby Dick took on a whole new meaning for me, I'll have to read it again. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michael Andrews | 12/21/2011

    " Absolutely the Most Interesting book I've read this year! Anyone with an interest in The Classics and Philosophy should find this a most important read. I highly recommend this book.All Things Shining: Reading the Western Classics to Find Meaning in a Secular Age "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Doug | 6/5/2011

    " I thought this book looked interesting if esoteric and intellectual. Well, I can dig esoteric and intellectual with the best of them, but this one was too much for me. Bleh "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 John Kelly | 6/1/2011

    " Poorly researched and poorly written. A sprawling mess of a book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Aileen | 5/8/2011

    " Interesting and thought-provoking literary criticism, although the last self-help-esque chapter can easily fall short of expectations. This book doesn't do much in terms of telling you what you should do, but it has changed the way I think about certain things. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Peter | 3/30/2011

    " Ever wondered why so many people in our modern western world look to other cultures to find meaning? Why does the west struggle with this? This is the book for you if you want to find meaning without yoga, jesus or buddha. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 John | 3/28/2011

    " Poorly researched and poorly written. A sprawling mess of a book. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Chris | 3/20/2011

    " surprisingly and disappointingly shallow. overly simplistic readings, especially of the christian tradition. their proposal for "meaning in a secular age" is embarrassingly naive. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Haley | 3/1/2011

    " Great book. Not sure I agree with all the precepts set forth, but I loved having so much food for thought. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Michael | 2/14/2011

    " Did you know DFW had a tattoo of Mary Karr's name inside a heart on his arm, then when he got married crossed out Mary, put an asterisk beside the heart, and lower on his arm put his wife's name next to another asterisk? Me either. So far, so good, if you're at all indecisive. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Corinna | 2/12/2011

    " This is a wonderful book and I gave it 4 stars instead of 5 because much of it in the middle was just over my head - I did not have the background in the classics to make sense of those parts. However there was plenty I could understand and it is a book I'll refer to from time to time. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 jen8998 | 2/9/2011

    " Promising start but soon derailed by simplistic analysis of Western cultural and religious traditions. "

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About the Narrator

David Drummond has made his living as an actor for over twenty-five years, appearing on stages large and small throughout the country and in Seattle, Washington, his hometown. He has narrated over thirty audiobooks, in genres ranging from current political commentary to historical nonfiction, fantasy, military, thrillers, and humor. He received an AudioFile Earphones Award for his first audiobook, Love ’Em or Lose ’Em: Getting Good People to Stay. When not narrating, he keeps busy writing plays and stories for children.