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Download Adams vs. Jefferson: The Tumultuous Election of 1800 Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Adams vs. Jefferson: The Tumultuous Election of 1800, by John Ferling Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (664 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: John Ferling Narrator: Jack Garrett Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date:
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It was a contest of titans: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, two heroes of the Revolutionary era, once intimate friends, now icy antagonists locked in a fierce battle for the future of the United States. The election of 1800 was a thunderous clash of a campaign that climaxed in a deadlock in the Electoral College and led to a crisis in which the young republic teetered on the edge of collapse. Adams vs. Jefferson is a gripping account of a true turning point in American history, a dramatic struggle between two parties with profoundly different visions of how the nation should be governed. Download and start listening now!


Quotes & Awards

  • “Ferling is especially adept at revealing the bare-knuckled partisanship that lay behind this vote, and the maneuvering between Burr and Federalists in the House of Representatives that might have made Burr president rather than Jefferson.”

    Washington Post

  • “The tale of Adams and Jefferson is a painful and moving one. They were friends, then enemies, then friends again over a period of more than fifty  years. Ferling does a good job of summing up the similarities that made their friendship possible as well as the differences destined to drive them apart.”

    Los Angeles Times

  • “Ferling’s straightforward narrative makes complicated history accessible to the average reader. He writes with authority, and his storyteller’s touch makes many of these figures come alive.”

    Wilmington News-Journal

  • “Veteran historian Ferling’s account of one of America’s most extraordinary political dramas lays bare the historically pugilist nature of American presidential politics…Ferling’s ultimate triumph is showing that, historically, when faced with dire circumstances at home and abroad, American democracy has pulled through.”

    Publishers Weekly

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 by Brad | 2/17/2014

    " Very good book. The author did a good job caturing the punch and counter punch campaigning style of Adams and Jefferson. If you think politics are dirty today, then give this book a chance! You will quickly see that it is nothing new. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 by Aaron | 1/27/2014

    " Good information, but fairly heavy on election analysis, especially on the election of 1800. I realize the importance of analysis of election results, but it could have been done in a more succinct way. Good otherwise, and a good view into the personal relationship between Adams and Jefferson, and the personality of each. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 by Billy | 1/6/2014

    " The election of 1800 was the first ever Presidential election, and it paved the way for all future elections with dirty tricks and tactics. However, unlike many other Presidential elections, the two men running for office this time were both great man did great things together and eventually rekindled their friendship. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 by Barb Rider | 12/27/2013

    " I listened to this as an audiobook, and I'm glad I did. The subject matter was fascinating. But I found the choice of words rather contrived and distracting - like text written for an SAT prep class, focusing on vocabulary building. There were frequent uses of "furthermore..." (at which point I could almost hear the audio book reader take a deep breath and sigh). Some examples of this vocabulary verbosity that I wrote down as soon as I pulled into the garage: "conditions in Europe were not propitious for the dispatch of envoys"..."He urged friendly scribes to write polemics on his behalf"... "He lived comfortably, secure from the fangs of a blood-thirsty foe." Really, isn't there a less pedantic way to write? "

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About the Author
Author John Ferling

John Ferling is professor emeritus of history at the State University of West Georgia. A leading authority on American Revolutionary history, he has appeared in many documentaries and has written numerous books, including The Ascent of George Washington: The Hidden Political Genius of an American Icon, Almost a Miracle: The American Victory in the War of Independence, Setting the World Ablaze: Washington, Adams, Jefferson, and the American Revolution, and the award-winning A Leap in the Dark: The Struggle to Create the American Republic.