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Download A Short History of Myth: The Myths Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample A Short History of Myth: The Myths (Unabridged), by Karen Armstrong
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,682 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Karen Armstrong Narrator: Sandra Burr Publisher: Brilliance Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2008 ISBN:
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What are myths? How have they evolved? And why do we still so desperately need them?

The history of myth is the history of humanity; our stories and beliefs, our curiosity and attempts to understand the world, link us to our ancestors and each other. Myths help us make sense of the universe. Armstrong takes us from the Palaeolithic period and the myths of the hunters right up to the Great Western Transformation of the last 500 years and the discrediting of myth by science.

Heralding a major series of retellings of international myths by authors from around the world, Armstrong's characteristically insightful and eloquent book serves as a brilliant and thought-provoking introduction to myth in the broadest sense - and why we dismiss it only at our peril. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cevad | 2/12/2014

    " I think it is nice book, especially its periodization of mythology is interesting, she says she takes it from Jaspers, nevertheless, her references focus on Eliade and a book of J Campbell.. Only in last parts she passes other sources, esp. primary sources. Briefly, it may only present the ideas of Eliadean School. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Hannah | 2/11/2014

    " This book got me so excited for the upcoming mythology course! Also, probably the first book I've ever read where immediately after finishing I turned to the bibliography and circled several books/articles I'd like to read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Katie | 1/31/2014

    " This book was very interesting, although I think I would have gotten more out of it if I had a better understanding of the basics of more religions. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Danna | 1/28/2014

    " Karen Armstrong's first sentence "Human beings have always been mythmakers" states a universal truth. Of course we've made myth to explain our origins, our creator/s, the world and universe, our ambivalence toward fellow creatures,our reasons for being, and most importantly, our deaths. The book begins with the birth of myth (and subsequently, religion) with the Neanderthal's and the Palaeolithic Period, and concludes with the death of myth and ritual with the Western Transformation. A fascinating read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Karen | 1/18/2014

    " I read this book in very small pieces which made it seem somewhat disjointed. I should have read it more in just one or two sittings to get the flow of what Armstrong was writing about. For the last chapter, I did read it that way and it really sunk in a lot more. In some ways it reminded me of Joseph Campbell and The Power of Myth which explores why we need myths in our lives. Armstrong discusses literature in the last section (probably because this is part of a series of retellings of myths) and I wanted to quote two sentences that I think really sum up both the power of mythology and of literature: "A novel, like a myth, teaches us to see the world differently; it shows us how to look into our own hearts and to see our world from a perspective that goes beyond our own self-interest. If professional religious leaders cannot instruct us in mythical lore, our artists and creative writers can perhaps step into this priestly role and bring fresh insight to our lost and damaged world." "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Martha | 1/15/2014

    " One of my favorite authors on religious/spiritual issues, this short tome provides insight into the importance of the sacred in our lives and how we (almost) have lost it since the advent of technology and the exaggerated importance of rational thinking in our daily lives. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Molly | 1/7/2014

    " Wished it had been more analytical as opposed to expository. Myths say so much... and I'm not sure she touched enough of it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Linda | 1/3/2014

    " You would only read a book like this if you were intrested in mythology, so I like it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Tortla | 12/29/2013

    " Armstrong takes a reductionist and Western thought priveleging perspective, and can be a bit condescending in her quasihopeful/didactically pro-myth tone. But interesting enough I guess... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Paul | 11/30/2013

    " I loved this. Absolutely fascinating for anyone interested in myths. And check out the other books in the series as well, especially the Margaret Atwood one, "The Penelopiad" "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Kris | 11/24/2013

    " There was no substance to this. You'd learn more from a Wikipedia entry. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Stephen Palmer | 10/23/2013

    " My favourite of Karen Armstrong's books - an inspirational work. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Richard | 3/4/2013

    " The last third of the book my most interesting to me. Showing our dismissive modern day attitude toward myth and how we got there. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ms. Suzanne | 2/7/2013

    " Great brief history of myth... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ellie | 1/27/2013

    " An interesting view on how the purpose of myths changed over time. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Greg Horton | 10/23/2012

    " A very nice, readable overview. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Emma | 10/13/2012

    " An okay history with a few factual errors. I do not agree with the authors argument that we need myths today. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jaime | 8/27/2012

    " A nice survey of the history of mythology. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Bethany | 5/23/2012

    " I'm not completely sure what I was hoping for, but this wasn't it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anita | 5/9/2011

    " Very satisfying summary of humanity's long-standing need for mythology. I like to be reminded of these things from time to time, and Karen Armstrong does a great job of presenting various styles of (and reasons for) myths thru the ages. The ending was unexpected - I liked where she went with it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lily | 3/22/2011

    " A lyrical and beautiful retelling of Greek myths that has aged very well. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Molly | 2/14/2011

    " A very quick read, which inspired me to delve further into Armstrong's work. I read this as part of step one of 12 Steps to a compassionate life. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Toshiko | 1/19/2011

    " Interesting way to see the world history. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Pat | 1/9/2011

    " Man creates myth. Myth becomes truth. The search for truth becomes conflict. Great read, very brief.
    "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Christine | 12/27/2010

    " Clear, evocative, and beautifully and warmly written, Armstrong's book serves as a review and context for all the mythology you have ever read. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Bethany | 10/12/2010

    " I'm not completely sure what I was hoping for, but this wasn't it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Luke | 10/9/2010

    " Excellent, short and to-the-point survey of myth and how mythos and logos switch in relevance as society advanced. She goes from cavemen to modern society in about 160 pages. Karen Armstrong is kind of rad - 'jus sayin. "

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