Download A Discourse on Method, Meditations on the First Philosophy, and Principles of Philosophy Audiobook

A Discourse on Method, Meditations on the First Philosophy, and Principles of Philosophy Audiobook, by René Descartes Extended Sample Click for printable size audiobook cover
Author: René Descartes Narrator: James Adams Publisher: Blackstone Publishing Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2009 ISBN: 9781481569293
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (5,896 ratings) (rate this audio book)
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This three-part work includes A Discourse on MethodMeditations on the First Philosophy, and Principles of Philosophy.

By calling everything into doubt, Descartes laid the foundations of modern philosophy. With the celebrated words “I think, therefore I am,” his compelling argument swept aside ancient and medieval traditions. He deduced that human beings consist of minds and bodies, that these are totally distinct “substances,” and that God exists and that he ensures we can trust the evidence of our senses. Ushering in the “scientific revolution” of Galileo and Newton, his ideas have set the agenda for debate ever since. His philosophical methods and investigation changed the course of Western philosophy and led to or transformed the fields of metaphysics, epistemology, physics, mathematics, political theory, and ethics.

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Quotes & Awards

  • “His aim was certainty—the kind of certainty that did not rely upon unobserved entities for the explanation of natural events nor upon the authority of learned theologians but by submitting everything to reason, in short by extending the clearness and distinctness of mathematical ideas and proofs to all spheres of human knowledge and to knowledge itself.”

    Chambers Biographical Dictionary

Listener Reviews

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  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Gilang | 2/9/2014

    " Susah juga ngikutin pemikiran ini orang hehehehe, jadinya agak bingung kasih rating akunya yang rada ga mudeng ato emang Descartes yang gila hehehe "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Sam | 1/28/2014

    " Not convinced. That is all. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Erik | 1/21/2014

    " Despite the title, this editions contains more than the Discourse, the other selections being given in the description appended. I read this volume to supplement the Descartes readings for a course entitled "History of Classical Modern Philosophy" taken at Loyola University Chicago during the first semester of 1980/81. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Juanpe | 1/5/2014

    " Quite interesting discussion on research methods and the Carthesian way of thinking. Still, it was kind of tedious to read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Nativeabuse | 12/20/2013

    " Don't recall much about this at all I just remember it being really really bland, and didn't really discuss much of use to me. boring. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joe | 11/29/2013

    " I like to review this every so often. I get new understanding each time. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Conrad | 8/31/2013

    " Recently reread this one because I am thinking of studying Daniel Dennet's book, Consciousness Explained. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Randy | 8/28/2012

    " I like Descartes. Easy to read and understand. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Phil | 9/11/2011

    " Loved it! I love his steps to come to truth. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Joshua | 5/26/2011

    " I really the humility expressed by Descartes, but his views on animals are devoid of any and all reason, I don't care what time he was living in. Common sense transcends culture. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Isaac | 4/27/2011

    " I'm actually reading the project gutenburg version, but you know.... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Suzanne | 4/23/2011

    " I read this in college and have very little memory of it, aside from the fact that it made me really think about consciousness - what we perceive as real. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Levi | 4/18/2011

    " Got me hooked on Metaphysics "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jordan | 4/6/2011

    " Descartes paved the way for modern skepticism, but his choice of 'what to do' once he got to the fundamental cogito is one of the stupidest things ever done in philosophy... We can't believe ANYTHING.... oh yeah, but god exists, so you can actually believe everything, nvm... o_O "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Monkeyinacoma | 3/27/2011

    " Whilst it was revolutionary, it doesn't mean it is right. The leap to attempting to prove god's existence is highly flawed at best. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sarah | 1/20/2011

    " I studied some chaptersof it in college, I haven't read all of it. But I liked it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Martin | 12/28/2010

    " Oh, Descartes. How did you miss the logical fallacy of using God as proof in your first meditation, but only proving God exists in the fifth? Party Foul, Rene. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Raf | 11/4/2010

    " Meditation 1-3 are pretty fantastic, the rest is Descartes talking from his rear.... "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mitchel | 10/22/2010

    " We're reading through this slowly in class. Yes, this semester sucks, thnx for the reminder, Descartes. Although I do love your argument that basically is the plot of Inception. Major props. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 doug | 9/28/2010

    " Elegant. The basis of modern philosophy. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Gabbie | 9/23/2010

    " had to read parts for a class, and think this book is a clear indication that descartes should have just stuck with math and left philosophy for those who werent afraid of admitting they didnt believe in the religion surrounding them... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Steve-0 | 9/13/2010

    " This book changed my whole outlook on life. Its amazing. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nikos | 9/6/2010

    " The most devastating thing I have ever read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Spawk | 7/17/2010

    " Historically , this book is important. Philosophically, it is unimpressive in every way. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 sofarsoShawn | 5/26/2010

    " Contained here are two of the most important philosophy works ever written, Descartes' "Discourse on the Method of Rightly Conducting the Reason …more "

About the Author

René Descartes (1596–1650) was a French philosopher, mathematician, physicist, and writer and is considered to be the father of modern philosophy and the founder of analytical geometry. He constructed a system of knowledge that discards perception as unreliable and instead relies on deduction as a method to ensure that our knowledge rests upon a firm foundation. He retained a deep religious faith as a Catholic to his dying day, along with a resolute desire to discover the truth. In 1663, the Pope placed his works on the Index of Prohibited Books.

About the Narrator

James Adams is one of the world’s leading authorities on terrorism and intelligence, and for more than twenty-five years he has specialized in national security. He is also the author of fourteen bestselling books on warfare, with a particular emphasis on covert warfare. A former managing editor of the London Sunday Times and CEO of United Press International, he trained as a journalist in England, where he graduated first in the country. Now living in Southern Oregon, he has narrated numerous audiobooks and earned an AudioFile Earphones Award and two coveted Audie Award for best narration.