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3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (4,757 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Alice Munro Narrator: Kimberly Farr, Arthur Morey Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: November 2009 ISBN: 9780307576743
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Ten superb new stories by one of our most beloved and admired writers—the winner of the 2009 Man Booker International Prize

In the first story, a young wife and mother receives release from the unbearable pain of losing her three children from a most surprising source. In another, a young woman, in the aftermath of an unusual and humiliating seduction, reacts in a clever, if less than admirable, fashion.

Other stories uncover the “deep holes” in a marriage, the unsuspected cruelty of children, and how a boy’s disfigured face provides both the good things in his life and the bad. And in the long title story, we accompany Sophia Kovalevsky, a late-nineteenth-century Russian émigrée and mathematician, on a winter journey that takes her from the Riviera, where she visits her lover, to Paris, Germany, and Denmark, where she has a fateful meeting with a local doctor, and finally to Sweden, where she teaches at the only university in Europe willing to employ a female mathematician.

With clarity and ease, Alice Munro once again renders complex, difficult events and emotions into stories that shed light on the unpredictable ways in which men and women accommodate and often transcend what happens in their lives.

Too Much Happiness is a compelling, provocative—even daring—collection.

Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • She is one of the handful of writers, some living, most dead, whom I have in mind when I say that fiction is my religion. Jonthan Franzen
  • The authority she brings to the page is just lovely. Elizabeth Strout
  • “More than virtually anyone else’s, Alice Munro’s stories unfold in surprising ways that nonetheless seem perfectly right. They are marvels of unhurried compression in which precision looks casual, in which everything is clearly in its place, though no one else might think to put it exactly thus.”

    Minneapolis Star Tribune

  • “More occurs in Munro’s short stories than in most novels…The pieces here…are thrilling permutations of her recurring themes: love, regret, the re-framing of one’s own personal narrative over time.”

    New York Post

  • “These ten short stories cement the capstone on what fellow Canadian Margaret Atwood has described as Munro’s ascent to ‘international literary sainthood’…The title story…is, in length and scope, Munro’s most ambitious story to date…May this house of hers, and its autumnal gardens, continue to be harvested to glorious effect.”

    Oregonian

  • “Few writers can match the clarity and immediacy of Munro’s descriptions whether she is portraying a subsiding marriage, a treacherous childhood, or the erotic and intellectual sojourn of a nineteenth century Russian mathematician.”

    Boston Globe

  • “Munro is the master of the inevitable surprise…[She] has an uncanny ability to take us inside a character’s mind.”

    St. Petersburg Times

  • “The unanticipated is in full force here, fresh and exciting. Munro seems to say that mundane lives constructed of order and routine are still governed by random acts. She hides human complexity in the ordinary until it surfaces in unimagined ways.”

    Providence Journal

  • “Shows Munro’s skills at their best.”

    Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

  • Her work felt revolutionary when I came to it, and it still does. Jhumpa Lahiri
  • “As always in her distinctive stories, Alice Murno’s style is vivid, her attention tireless, her curiosity omnivorous, and her sentences drawn from the freshest of springs.”

    Washington Post

  • “Stunning…An unexpected gift…Here we have ten perfectly honed pieces, each a study of the human psyche in hard-to-imagine circumstances that Munro presents, seemingly effortlessly, in an economy of words and sentences.”

    Buffalo News

  • “Coherent and compelling…Munro manages to turn the sentimental into the existential.”

    Philadelphia Inquirer

  • “[Munro is] universally acknowledged as one of the greatest short-story writers of our time…[Her] work [is] at such a high level…These stories are extraordinary, ample with the shrewdness and empathy that we have come to take for granted in Munro…Her most distinguishing characteristic as a writer is…her extraordinary intimacy with her characters.”

    New Republic

  • “There’s never too much happiness in a Munro collection, just sentence after sentence to die for.”

    Louisville Courier-Journal

  • “Rich and satisfying…A commanding collection and one of her strongest…Short fiction of this caliber should be on everyone’s reading list. Munro’s stories are accessible; she simply writes about life…Honest, intuitive storytelling that gives the short story a good name.”

    Chicago Sun-Times

  • “Rich…Truthful, in the deepest sense of the word…Reading an Alice Munro short story is like sinking into a reverie. She expertly captures the shadings and byways of associative thought…[Munro] will surely be remembered as the writer who took the short story to the depth of what short fiction can plumb.”

    Kansas City Star

  • “Finely, even ingeniously, crafted…Deliver[ed] with instinctive acuity.”

    Seattle Times

  • “A brand-new collection of short stories from Alice Munro—winner of a Man Booker Prize—is always cause for celebration, and Too Much Happiness doesn’t disappoint. It dazzles. The ten spare, lovely tales are…brimming with emotion and memorable characters…Munro’s are stories that linger long after you turn the last page.”

    Entertainment Weekly

  • “Daring and unpredictable…Reading Munro is an intensely personal experience. Her focus is so clear and her style so precise…Each [story is] dramatically and subtly different.”

    Miami Herald

  • “Masterly…[A] remarkable new book.”

    Los Angeles Times

  • “A perfect ten…With this collection of surprising short stories, Munro once again displays the fertility of her imagination and her craftsmanship as a writer.”

    USA Today

  • “It’s hard to imagine that anyone could write stories richer than these. Until the next Munro collection.”

    Kirkus Reviews

  • “Richly detailed and dense with psychological observation…Munro exhibit[s] a remarkable gift for transforming the seemingly artless into art…[She] concentrate[s] upon provincial, even backcountry lives, in tales of domestic tragicomedy that seem to open up, as if by magic, into wider, deeper, vaster dimensions.”

    New York Review of Books

  • “Alice Munro has done it again…[She] keeps getting better…Her brush strokes are fine, her vision encompasses humanity from its most generous to its most corrupt, and the effect is nothing short of masterful.”

    San Francisco Chronicle

  • She’s the most savage writer I’ve ever read, also the most tender, the most honest, the most perceptive. Jeffery Eugenides
  • Alice Munro can move characters through time in a way that no other writer can. Julian Barnes
  • She is a short-story writer who…reimagined what a story can do. Loorie Moore
  • There’s probably no one alive who’s better at the craft of the short story. Jim Shepard
  • A true master of the form. Salman Rushdie
  • A wonderful writer. Joyce Carol Oates
  • [Munro is] universally acknowledged as one of the greatest short-story writers of our time. . . . [Her] work [is] at such a high level. . . . These stories are extraordinary, ample with the shrewdness and empathy that we have come to take for granted in Munro. . . . Her most distinguishing characteristic as a writer is . . . her extraordinary intimacy with her characters. The New Republic
  • Coherent and compelling. . . . Munro manages to turn the sentimental into the existential. The Philadelphia Inquirer
  • Stunning. . . . An unexpected gift. . . . Here we have 10 perfectly honed pieces, each a study of the human psyche in hard-to-imagine circumstances that Munro presents, seemingly effortlessly, in an economy of words and sentences. The Buffalo News
  • As always in her distinctive stories, Alice Murno’s style is vivid, her attention tireless, her curiosity omnivorous, and her sentences drawn from the freshest of springs. The Washington Post
  • If there’s a better short story writer working today than Alice Munro, I haven’t read her. In story after story, Munro manages to compress whole lives and emotional arcs into 20 or so shapely pages, long enough to engage us in their world but short enough to absorb in a single sitting or commute. Her prose is spare without feeling rushed or cryptic, at once lucid and subtle. Heller McAlpin, The Christian Science Monitor
  • I sit still for Alice Munro’s expository passages every time. She lays down such seemingly ordinary but useful sentences, one after another after another. . . . I stay to marvel. . . . Is there anyone writing short fiction today in English who has more authority? Alan Cheuse, NPR
  • Beautiful. . . . With great insights into human nature. The Grand Rapids Press
  • All varying degrees of excellent. . . . A work of supreme observational power, employing Munro’s deft, controlled sentences in the service of essaying characters who don’t realize they’re living their lives on the brink until revelation rushes over them. The A.V. Club
  • Another piercing collection. . . . It’s a testament to Munro’s mastery that she can make the lurid sing with nuance and explicability. . . . Her ear for dialogue is unerring. . . . Whatever format you favor in storytelling, go ahead and enter Too Much Happiness.  It will carry you safely through the gates, and no doubt send you looking for other castles constructed by the stunning Alice Munro. The Plain Dealer
  • Shows Munro’s skills at their best. The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
  • Outstanding. . . . [Munro] writes concise descriptions that bring characters and settings to life. . . . [and] throws in observations that serve as nuggets of wisdom. The Wichita Eagle
  • Consistently engrossing . . . Thoughtfully wrought. . . . [The] material is given piercing clarity by the resolute simplicity and restraint of Ms. Munro’s prose. . . . She can raise hackles on the back of your neck with a precisely phrased unadorned verb or noun. . . . The Munro magic is showcased brilliantly. The Washington Times
  • The unanticipated is in full force here, fresh and exciting. Munro seems to say that mundane lives constructed of order and routine are still governed by random acts. She hides human complexity in the ordinary until it surfaces in unimagined ways. The Providence Journal
  • As poignant [and] chilling as they come. . . . Why [Munro] is rightly regarded as a master of the form is her deliberate, suspenseful layering of characters and circumstances. . . . Every story in Too Much Happiness is, in a sense, a life story. . . . It’s as if the characters are reading along with these mini life lessons, emerging with enviable wisdom and perspective. The L Magazine
  • Munro is the master of the inevitable surprise. . . . [She] has an uncanny ability to take us inside a character’s mind. The St. Petersburg Times
  • Few writers can match the clarity and immediacy of Munro’s descriptions whether she is portraying a subsiding marriage, a treacherous childhood, or the erotic and intellectual sojourn of a 19th century Russian mathematician. The Boston Globe
  • These ten short stories cement the capstone on what fellow Canadian Margaret Atwood has described as Munro’s ascent to ‘international literary sainthood’. . . . The title story . . . is, in length and scope, Munro’s most ambitious story to date. . . . May this house of hers, and its autumnal gardens, continue to be harvested to glorious effect. The Oregonian
  • Intrigue and manipulation fill the vividly drawn stories in this collection. The Sacramento Bee
  • More occurs in Munro’s short stories than in most novels. . . . The pieces here . . . are thrilling permutations of her recurring themes: love, regret, the re-framing of one’s own personal narrative over time. The New York Post
  • More than virtually anyone else’s, Alice Munro’s stories unfold in surprising ways that nonetheless seem perfectly right. They are marvels of unhurried compression in which precision looks casual, in which everything is clearly in its place, though no one else might think to put it exactly thus. Minneapolis Star Tribune

    Praise from fellow writers:
  • “Another piercing collection…It’s a testament to Munro’s mastery that she can make the lurid sing with nuance and explicability…Her ear for dialogue is unerring…Whatever format you favor in storytelling, go ahead and enter Too Much Happiness.  It will carry you safely through the gates, and no doubt send you looking for other castles constructed by the stunning Alice Munro.”

    Plain Dealer

  • “Beautiful…With great insights into human nature.”

    Grand Rapids Pass

  • “I sit still for Alice Munro’s expository passages every time. She lays down such seemingly ordinary but useful sentences, one after another after another…I stay to marvel…Is there anyone writing short fiction today in English who has more authority?”

    NPR

  • “If there’s a better short story writer working today than Alice Munro, I haven’t read her. In story after story, Munro manages to compress whole lives and emotional arcs into twenty or so shapely pages, long enough to engage us in their world but short enough to absorb in a single sitting or commute. Her prose is spare without feeling rushed or cryptic, at once lucid and subtle.”

    Christian Science Monitor

  • “Consistently engrossing…Thoughtfully wrought…[The] material is given piercing clarity by the resolute simplicity and restraint of Ms. Munro’s prose…She can raise hackles on the back of your neck with a precisely phrased, unadorned verb or noun…The Munro magic is showcased brilliantly.”

    Washington Times

  • “Profound and beautiful.”

    O, The Oprah Magazine

  • Filled with subtle and far-reaching thematic reverberations. . . . [Munro has] an empathy so pitch-perfect. . . . You [are] drawn deftly into another world. The New York Times Book Review
  • Profound and beautiful. Francine Prose, O, The Oprah Magazine
  • Alice Munro has done it again. . . . [She] keeps getting better. . . . Her brush strokes are fine, her vision encompasses humanity from its most generous to its most corrupt, and the effect is nothing short of masterful. The San Francisco Chronicle
  • Richly detailed and dense with psychological observation. . . . Munro exhibit[s] a remarkable gift for transforming the seemingly artless into art . . . [She] concentrate[s] upon provincial, even backcountry lives, in tales of domestic tragicomedy that seem to open up, as if by magic, into wider, deeper, vaster dimensions. Joyce Carol Oates, New York Review of Books
  • A perfect 10. . . . With this collection of surprising short stories, Munro once again displays the fertility of her imagination and her craftsmanship as a writer. USA Today
  • Masterly. . . . [A] remarkable new book. The Los Angeles Times
  • Daring and unpredictable. . . . Reading Munro is an intensely personal experience. Her focus is so clear and her style so precise. . . . Each [story is] dramatically and subtly different. The Miami Herald
  • A brand-new collection of short stories from Alice Munro—winner of a Man Booker Prize—is always cause for celebration, and Too Much Happiness doesn’t disappoint. It dazzles. The 10 spare, lovely tales are . . . brimming with emotion and memorable characters. . . . Munro’s are stories that linger long after you turn the last page. Entertainment Weekly, Grade A
  • Finely, even ingeniously, crafted. . . . Deliver[ed] with instinctive acuity. The Seattle Times
  • Rich. . . . Truthful, in the deepest sense of the word. . . . Reading an Alice Munro short story is like sinking into a reverie. She expertly captures the shadings and byways of associative thought. . . . [Munro] will surely be remembered as the writer who took the short story to the depth of what short fiction can plumb. The Kansas City Star, Best 100 Books of 2009
  • Rich and satisfying. . . . A commanding collection and one of her strongest. . . . Short fiction of this caliber should be on everyone’s reading list. Munro’s stories are accessible; she simply writes about life. . . . Honest, intuitive storytelling that gives the short story a good name. Chicago Sun-Times
  • There's never too much happiness in a Munro collection, just sentence after sentence to die for. Louisville Courier-Journal
  • A 2009 Kansas City Star Top 100 Book
  • A 2009 Washington Post Best Audiobook
  • One of the 2009 New York Times Book Review 100 Notable Books for Fiction
  • A New York Times Bestseller
  • Selected for the December 2009 Indie Next List

Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Anu | 2/19/2014

    " First I have to admit - I am not always a big fan of short storied. In addition to that these are a little creepy and did not really hold my attention. The stories are very descriptive and wandering and might be a better read for someone who subtlety in their reads. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jed | 2/9/2014

    " Munro's stories are as pretty as paintings and sharp as razors. Some of them slicing so deep you wonder if you'll heal. Her ability to jump through time in a short fiction lends a sense of a long acquaintance with characters, the kind that usually comes with a full novel. So when the drama develops-- or strikes-- it's easy to take it really hard. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Archana | 2/5/2014

    " Exceptional writing, high drama in small human moments, really sad and dark. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mary Ann Rockwell | 1/28/2014

    " One blurb for this book calls Monroe "our Chekov." I think that is apt - since few women were allowed into the arena of being called 'a master'. She is a master short story writer. She has that negative capability Keats wrote of - she draws characters so swiftly without being reductive, and sets the loose without judgement. The ordinary becomes extraordinary. The gamut of human courage and weakness can be felt and marveled at. A quotidian page-turner. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bethany Ball | 1/27/2014

    " This book is teaching me to tell the story that I'm recently working on. What better rec is that? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 noisy penguin | 1/23/2014

    " I quite liked all the stories except for the title story. The other stories are all beautifully written stories of everyday people in unusual, awful, heartbreaking situations. I'm amazed at her ability to fit in so much detail and such strong characters in such a short space. Except in the last story, that is. It seems like Munro got too wrapped up in the real-life details of Sophia and tried to cram as much as she could into the short story and we got a lot of history and a lot of names and not a lot of in-depth exploration of any of the characters. It felt choppy, I felt like I was just slogging through it, and it didn't mesh well with the rest of the book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 D Sky | 1/17/2014

    " The stories are so strong they are almost graphic. Munro's never been one to hold your hand through her stories. In this she almost seems to hold your head under. Almost. She also never been for a careless reader either. Beautiful as usual. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mk | 1/14/2014

    " The reviews were outstanding, but the book don't live up to them. Didn't relaize they'd all be sad stories, ugh. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Janine | 1/13/2014

    " Loved this book though not all stories are just "on the money" for me. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Shimin | 1/8/2014

    " A rather profound scrutinity into the tangled complex web of relations people share with their spouses, their family and with themselves. Highly thought-provoking and demanding of readers to do intensive insight. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Flora | 1/2/2014

    " depressing stories but i couldn't stop reading each just to find out what horrible thing would happen to each character. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jjpierce | 12/25/2013

    " Her stories are fascinating! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Aisling | 12/14/2013

    " Alice Munro's short stories are always a treat to read. This collection is no exception. The stories generally have some kind of twist. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Maurene | 12/2/2013

    " Quiet, lovely stories. Pretty heartbreaking at times. I haven't read a good short story collection in awhile and this one was a real treat. I especially loved "Wenlock Edge." Elegant, curious, good. But when isn't Alice Munro perfect? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Christine Bloom | 10/17/2013

    " I listened to the stories on my daily walk with my lab. The stories were different but the narrative voice for each storycwas too similar. The characters seemed to be all the same but the writing was beautiful. Each story hit the same ponts. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Margaret | 10/6/2013

    " Nobody captures the subtle relationships between people as well as Alice. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Peggy | 9/24/2013

    " Reading Alice Munro is a humbling experience. She is a master of the short story. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cara | 8/20/2013

    " Typical Alice Munro... genius. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tisha | 5/7/2013

    " The writing was actually really good. However, the stories were just a little too depressing for me. I seemed to get the message that everyone has hidden secrets in their lives, marriages never last, and people are just selfish. I did enjoy the read though. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Michele | 2/18/2013

    " Each phrase, sentence and paragraph was well crafted. However, I felt let down by the overall plots of each story. I looked for an Alice Munro novel in hopes that I would enjoy a longer tale, but short stories are apparently her specialty. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Darlene | 8/25/2012

    " Loved these short stories which says alot because I'm not a short story reader. Can't wait to read more by Munro. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Todd | 8/9/2012

    " I hesitate to say that this is Munro at her best, because when isn't she at her best? This collection of stories is on par with her past writings, and as always, I have been properly devastated upon completion of each story. She is the master of the short story format, bar none. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 MJ Porteous | 1/30/2012

    " A great literary writer with tremendous insight "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julie | 1/16/2012

    " I have heard about Alice Munro for years, but it was not until I read the short stories If I Loved You, I Would Tell You This and loved them did I feel compelled to read her work. These stories made me think deeply, and feel deeply. The first story in particular was like a whole novel. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Panda | 1/5/2012

    " This writer is the best short story writer since Chekhov. These stories are vibrant, full of character and each one is a little gem. I had read many of these stories in Harpers Magazine and they were definitely worth a second reading. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Annika | 8/25/2011

    " Ten poerful and unforgettable stories. I rarely encounter a story by Munro that I don't love. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sandra aka Sleo | 7/29/2011

    " I finally finished it. A collection of wry, poignant, dark (Child's Play) and historic (the title story), written in Alice Munro's tight prose. Masterful. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Taylor Kate | 6/29/2011

    " Should really be titled: not enough happiness ever. But still excellent stories. Novella about the mathematician was the best. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 natalia | 6/23/2011

    " Probably a good book for a lazy winter read. Well written but at times somewhat monotonous. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kate | 6/16/2011

    " The short stories were interesting-- intriguing, but unsatisfying the way short stories are. I think the dissatisfaction I have with the book has more to do with the genre than with the book itself. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sang Ayu | 6/2/2011

    " brilliant short stories, compelling in its simplicity. depicting ordinary people in ordinary circumstances yet underscored with something more beneath them. Alice Munro's prose is beautiful.
    "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lena | 6/1/2011

    " I particularly liked Child's Play and Wood. The short stories are complete in themselves, and make good reading. I also liked the Canadian settings. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Katie | 5/22/2011

    " The short story "Fiction" is maybe the best thing I've ever read? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sue | 5/19/2011

    " Another great book of Alice Monroe stories! I had read several of them in the New Yorker. But I didn't mind reading them a second time. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Arlene | 5/17/2011

    " VERY DEPRESSING COMPILATION OF WOMEN SHORT STORIES "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Johanna | 5/16/2011

    " I just love Alice Munro and this collection of short stories did not disappoint. I want to be her. She has a weird and unique way of looking at people and great skill in creating an atmosphere. Well deserved winner of 2009 Man Booker prize. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kerry | 5/15/2011

    " Alice Munro is one of the best authors today. Her short stories are poignant, troubling, heartening, and realistic. She does not sugar coat our existence but shows us how to accept it's beauty in its reality -- not how we want it to be. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Rachel | 5/8/2011

    " read about 30 pgs which is most of the 1st short story & did not like the characters or story line - too depressing! skimmed the 2nd short story & declared this book is not for me! "

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About the Author
Author Alice Munro

Alice Munro, winner of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature, grew up in Wingham, Ontario, and attended the University of Western Ontario. She has published eleven collections of stories and two volumes of selected stories, as well as a novel. During her distinguished career she has been the recipient of many awards and prizes, including three of Canada’s Governor General’s Literary Awards and two of its Giller Prizes, the Rea Award for the Short Story, the Lannan Literary Award, England’s W. H. Smith Book Award, the United States’ National Book Critics Circle Award, the Edward MacDowell Medal in literature, and the Man Booker International Prize. Her stories have appeared in the New Yorker, Atlantic Monthly, Paris Review, and other publications, and her collections have been translated into thirteen languages. She lives in Clinton, Ontario, near Lake Huron.

About the Narrators

Kimberly Farr is an actress and eight-time winner of the AudioFile Earphones Award for narration. She has appeared on Broadway and at the New York Shakespeare Festival, the Roundabout Theatre, Playwright’s Horizons, and the American Place. She created the role of “Eve” in Arthur Miller’s first and only musical, Up from Paradise, which was directed by the author. She appeared with Vanessa Redgrave in the Broadway production of The Lady from the Sea and has acted in regional theaters across the country, including a performance in the original production of The 1940’s Radio Hour at Washington, DC’s Arena Stage.

Arthur Morey has won three AudioFile Magazine “Best Of” Awards: in 2011 for Biography and History, in for History and Historical Fiction, and in 2009 for Nonfiction and Culture. His work has also garnered multiple AudioFile Earphones awards, and he has been nominated for an Audie Award. He graduated from Harvard and did graduate work at the University of Chicago. He has won awards for his fiction and drama, worked as an editor with several book publishers, and taught literature and writing at Northwestern University. As a narrator, he has received nineteen AudioFile Earphones Awards and been a finalist for the prestigious Audie Award.