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Download The Sonderberg Case Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Sonderberg Case Audiobook, by Elie Wiesel Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (233 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Elie Wiesel Narrator: Mark Bramhall Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2010 ISBN: 9780307734648
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From the Nobel laureate and author of the masterly Night, a deeply felt, beautifully written novel of morality, guilt, and innocence.

Despite personal success, Yedidyah—a theater critic in New York City, husband to a stage actress, father to two sons—finds himself increasingly drawn to the past. As he reflects on his life and the decisions he’s made, he longingly reminisces about the relationships he once had with the men in his family (his father, his uncle, his grandfather) and the questions that remain unanswered. It’s a feeling that is further complicated when Yedidyah is assigned to cover the murder trial of a German expatriate named Werner Sonderberg. Sonderberg returned alone from a walk in the Adirondacks with an elderly uncle, whose lifeless body was soon retrieved from the woods. His plea is enigmatic: “Guilty . . . and not guilty.” 

These words strike a chord in Yedidyah, plunging him into feelings that bring him harrowingly close to madness. As Sonderberg’s trial moves along a path of dizzying yet revelatory twists and turns, Yedidyah begins to understand his own family’s hidden past and finally liberates himself from the shadow it has cast over his life.

With his signature elegance and thoughtfulness, Elie Wiesel has given us an enthralling psychological mystery, both vividly dramatic and profoundly emotional.

Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “Elie Wiesel continues to be a voice of modern humanity’s conscience with his latest work, a beautifully layered book . . . [In The Sonderberg Case] the Nobel Laureate exploits his greatest strength: words beaming through the window that peers into the author’s soul.  For a brief moment of holy catharsis, we become Wiesel. Francis RTM Boyle, Time Out New York

  • From the first clear, simple sentence, melancholy hangs over the story, always permeating the author’s voice . . . The theme of the Jew today confronting his own family history remains powerful. Booklist
     
  • Wiesel’s latest novel is full of questions . . . Is Sonderberg guilty? The answer is satisfying if not surprising, a good description of this musing, almost fablelike work.             Library Journal
     
  • Ambitious . . . Compelling.             Publishers Weekly

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Elizabeth | 2/19/2014

    " Guilty and not guilty. How can someone be both guilty and not guilty? How does one live inside quotation marks? We don't live in the past but the past lives in us. A very thoughtful read on guilt, innocence, morality, and the Holocaust. Eli once again gives us something profound. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Michael Jenkins | 2/19/2014

    " I thought this book was very dull,it lacked the emotion that I thought it would have,judging by the synopsis. The characters were almost forgettable, between Yedidzah career path as a theater critic and him longing for the men that helped him, it was not anything to be excited. I understand what the author was trying to convey when there is a lifeless body found I was expecting something amazing but to no avail, it has grown stale. This was not what I expected,now I am going to have second thoughts before reading a book that "looks" good. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tc Hartsock | 2/6/2014

    " Hard to follow at first....ends abruptly, but somewhere in the middle you become entranced... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cathy Ruehe | 1/28/2014

    " I think this is the first Elie Wiesel book I've read. Thought provoking. Interesting premise. Full of literary and philosophical references to illustrious writers (none that I've read). So, I felt a little out of my comfort zone. I did like the way his thoughts were so BIG, Are all his books like this? Heavy with deep meaning and moral dilemnas? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Cooper Renner | 1/25/2014

    " At the heart of this novel is a trial, the Sonderberg case, but as things develop the "case" is more than just a trial. An investigation of guilt and innocence and what it means to be human. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Pamela | 1/23/2014

    " His writing style really bothers me---all the questions. Plus, the plot is seems lacking--or beside the point. However, the strength was the theme of guilt inherited by German generations after WWII and the sense of thwarted purpose STILL felt by the elder Sonderberg. A deeper exploration of these conflicting emotions would have served the book better. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Marita | 1/20/2014

    " I was looking for a book to take to a long airplane trip to Europe. And miracle of miracles this through noise canceling headphones put me to sleep and we arrived in what seemed like no time! :) Not Wiesel's best work. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Lisa | 1/19/2014

    " It's not that this was a horrible book. In fact, there were parts I enjoyed. Overall, the book was all over the place, and I feel like the reader is left with too many questions. This book was a little to deep and a little to heavy at parts for my liking. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Chery | 1/9/2014

    " Very difficult to follow. The perspective keeps changing; it could be because of the translation from French. I could not really get into it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sarah Cedarface | 12/21/2013

    " Very good novel about a Jewish journalist who was an infant during the Holocaust. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sharon Archer | 11/29/2013

    " read his book "Night" and saw this on the shelf...even though I enjoyed the twisty plot, it was a wee bit hard to follow in the beginning...but what a finish!!..think I have found a new favorite author... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mary Engels | 11/27/2013

    " Definitely a powerful story, especially the end. First novel by this author I have read - I will definitely read more of his fiction. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Renee | 8/3/2013

    " I had very high hopes when I started out but in the end, I found this book by Elie Wiesel to be too fragmented for my taste. It seemed that either things in the story needed to be cut out or expanded upon significantly. And the main character's wife......what was up with her? "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ilene | 4/10/2013

    " The story had a lot of philosophical musings and a little bit of a mystery. I would have preferred a lot of mystery and a little bit of philosophical musings. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mckinley | 1/9/2013

    " Not as much as his some of his other work, although also better than some too. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Clare | 11/25/2012

    " Wiesel's books are often hard to read because of their subject matter. This is true even when he writes a novel. I recommend this to those who are interested in the holocaust and what happens to the children and grandchildren of survivors/those who did not survive. It is also a good mystery. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Briana Alzola | 11/22/2012

    " As a journalist and an avid theatre fan, a book whose main character was a theatre reviewer for a newspaper was ideal. The book was moving and compelling. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Wandac | 10/2/2012

    " Enjoyed. Of course obsessed with the holocaust. Trial of a young German who may have murdered his uncle. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dawn | 8/13/2012

    " Guilty, and not guilty. A phrase from the book that sums up this story as well as so many other things in life. Guilty and not guilty. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Spider | 6/24/2012

    " I was a bit confused by the story, in which the protagonist makes a discovery about his parents & his family history. The writing & reading were great. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Penny | 3/25/2012

    " This was a riveting book for me. I read it in two sittings -- which is unusual for me. A novel about a man who was a "hidden child" during the holocaust and only late in life learns of his true identity through contact with a German man. Very compelling. I highly recommend it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Shamsh | 3/11/2012

    " Great prose as it is usual with Wiesel. Interesting plot and surprising and meaningful ending. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marie | 2/5/2012

    " this author continues to amaze! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Debra | 1/27/2012

    " Elie Wiesel is renown for his books dealing with the Holocaust. At age 15 Elie was interned at Auchwitz in Poland. The Sonderberg Case asks how the German nation could kill 6 million Jews. The answer: pure hatred. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sarah | 9/24/2010

    " This book was anticlimactic... "

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About the Author
Author Elie Wiesel

Elie Wiesel (1928–2016) was the author of more than fifty books, both fiction and nonfiction, including his masterly memoir Night. He was awarded the United States Congressional Gold Medal, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the rank of Grand-Croix in the French Legion of Honor, an honorary knighthood of the British Empire, and, in 1986, the Nobel Peace Prize. Since 1976, he served as the the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Boston University.

About the Narrator

Mark Bramhall has won thirty-four AudioFile Earphones Awards and has twice been a finalist for the Audiobook Publishers Association’s prestigious Audie Award for best narration. He has been named by Publishers Weekly and AudioFile magazine among their “Best Voices of the Year” in 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013. He is also an award-winning actor whose acting credits include off-Broadway, regional, and many Los Angeles venues as well as television, animation, and feature films. He has taught and directed at the American Academy of Dramatic Art.