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Download The Predictioneer’s Game: Using the Logic of Brazen Self-Interest to See and Shape the Future Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Predictioneer’s Game: Using the Logic of Brazen Self-Interest to See and Shape the Future Audiobook, by Bruce Bueno de Mesquita Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (248 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Bruce Bueno de Mesquita Narrator: Sean Runnette Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: September 2009 ISBN: 9780307702142
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Bruce Bueno de Mesquita is a master of game theory, which is a fancy label for a simple idea: People compete, and they always do what they think is in their own best interest. Bueno de Mesquita uses game theory and its insights into human behavior to predict and even engineer political, financial, and personal events. His forecasts, which have been employed by everyone from the CIA to major business firms, have an amazing 90 percent accuracy rate, and in this dazzling and revelatory book he shares his startling methods and lets you play along in a range of high-stakes negotiations and conflicts.

Revealing the origins of game theory and the advances made by John Nash, the Nobel Prize—winning scientist perhaps best known from A Beautiful Mind, Bueno de Mesquita details the controversial and cold-eyed system of calculation that he has since created, one that allows individuals to think strategically about what their opponents want, how much they want it, and how they might react to every move. From there, Bueno de Mesquita games such events as the North Korean disarmament talks and the Middle East peace process and recalls, among other cases, how he correctly predicted which corporate clients of the Arthur Andersen accounting firm were most likely engaged in fraudulent activity (hint: one of them started with an E). And looking as ever to the future, Bueno de Mesquita also demonstrates how game theory can provide successful strategies to combat both global warming (instead of relying on empty regulations, make nations compete in technology) and terror (figure out exactly how much U.S. aid will make Pakistan fight the Taliban).

But as Bueno de Mesquita shows, game theory isn’t just for saving the world. It can help you in your own life, whether you want to succeed in a lawsuit (lawyers argue too much the merits of the case and question too little the motives of their opponents), elect the CEO of your company (change the system of voting on your board to be more advantageous to your candidate), or even buy a car (start by knowing exactly what you want, call every dealer in a fifty-mile radius, and negotiate only over the phone).

Savvy, provocative, and shockingly effective, The Predictioneer’s Game will change how you understand the world and manage your future. Life’s a game, and how you play is whether you win or lose.

Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Nathan | 1/26/2014

    " Too much ego, not enough detail. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 David | 1/3/2014

    " Truly a fascinating book! De Mesquita has used the game theory of John Nash to develop a series of models that help him to predict future events. The predictions are not simply binary (yes/no) prognostications--they are in-depth analyses that describe what will happen, and why. The author claims a 90% success rate. The last few chapters include a set of detailed predictions made by HIS STUDENTS using his models. Some of the predictions (most notably, Pakistan) are starting to come to pass, now. Others will be proven--or disproven--within the near future. Of course, this book is sort of an advertisement for the author's consulting company. Nevertheless, I've been recommending this book to everybody. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Larissa | 12/24/2013

    " This is one of the best books I've read in a long time. It's a fascinating read! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Emma | 12/13/2013

    " Pretty boring. I was excited about a book that sounded like game theory, but this was really disappointing. And tendentious. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jon | 12/12/2013

    " A really remarkable book. The author is the pre-eminent scholar on applying algorithmic techniques to predicting macro scale problems/solutions in economics and politics. It has interesting and wide-scale implications. It shows just how predictable and primitive human incentives are. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Converse | 9/28/2013

    " Entertaining applications of game theory (w/o much math, mainly computer simulation results) to politics, lawsuits, and buying car. May be worth it for the car buying advice alone. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Aagave | 7/23/2013

    " It discusses a game theory model without revealing the model. So it's lessons from an obscured model... Which makes the application of the lessons limited in their value. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Niko05 | 5/3/2013

    " Though the subject was fascinating, the author dd a poor job illustrating his points. SO I gave it a weak 3 stars only because it was a tough subject to tackle... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rob | 4/27/2013

    " Really fantastic book. I am sure that the scope of his methods are polarizing, but I am in. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mark Babcock | 6/15/2012

    " Interesting guy who can predict the future better than the experts. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amber | 5/1/2012

    " Short, easy read; I already knew the basic game theory, but the stuff on design of game based on expert knowledge was insightful; didn't blather on "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Daniel O'dell | 8/4/2011

    " I've enjoyed learning the basics of game theory without the math, but find the book overall somewhat tedious. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jacob | 5/10/2011

    " A popularized (no equations) book on using game theory to predict networked political problems which often turn out to be resolved or described by a mathematical model of the political actors' self-interest. Worth reading to realize that such models are usually intuitive. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Fernando | 3/30/2011

    " The topic is extremely interesting, but I was not captivated by the writing style: too dense, too focused on the author's accomplishments as opposed to the subject itself.
    Still an interesting read for those interested in conflict resolution and game theory.
    "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Nathan | 2/13/2011

    " Too much ego, not enough detail. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Paul | 1/7/2011

    " A lot of stories about how cool game theory is. Not so much game theory. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Emma | 8/3/2010

    " Pretty boring. I was excited about a book that sounded like game theory, but this was really disappointing. And tendentious. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Converse | 7/5/2010

    " Entertaining applications of game theory (w/o much math, mainly computer simulation results) to politics, lawsuits, and buying car. May be worth it for the car buying advice alone.
    "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rob | 3/23/2010

    " Really fantastic book. I am sure that the scope of his methods are polarizing, but I am in. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jon | 12/29/2009

    " A really remarkable book. The author is the pre-eminent scholar on applying algorithmic techniques to predicting macro scale problems/solutions in economics and politics. It has interesting and wide-scale implications. It shows just how predictable and primitive human incentives are. "

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About the Author

Bruce Bueno de Mesquita is the Julius Silver Professor of Politics and director of the Alexander Hamilton Center for Political Economy at New York University, as well as a senior fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution. He is the author of several books, including The Predictioneer’s Game; Principles of International Politics; Predicting Politics; Strategy, Risk and Personality in Coalition Politics; and the coauthor of many others. Bruce received his doctorate in political science from the University of Michigan in 1971 and a doctorate from the University of Groningen in 1999. He is the 2007 recipient of South Korea’s DMZ Peace Prize, and the recipient of many other academic honors for his teaching and research. Bruce lives with his wife, Arlene, in San Francisco and New York.

About the Narrator

Sean Runnette, an Earphones Award–winning narrator, has also directed and produced more than two hundred audiobooks, including several Audie Award winners. He is a member of the American Repertory Theater company and has toured the United States and internationally with ART and Mabou Mines. His television and film appearances include Two If by Sea, Cop Land, Sex and the City, Law & Order, the award-winning film Easter, and numerous commercials.