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Download The Lives of a Cell: Notes of a Biology Watcher Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Lives of a Cell: Notes of a Biology Watcher (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Lewis Thomas
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (2,883 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Lewis Thomas Narrator: Tom Parker Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc. Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 1999 ISBN:
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In The Lives of a Cell, Dr. Lewis Thomas opens up to the listener a universe of knowledge and perception that is perhaps not wholly unfamiliar to the research scientist; but the world he explores is also one of men and women, of complex interrelationships, old ironies, peculiar powers, and intricate languages that give identity to the alienated and direction to the dependent. This remarkable work offers a subtle, bold vision of humankind and the world around us - a sense of what gives life - from a writer who seems to draw grace and strength from the very substance of his subject, a man of wit and imagination who takes pleasure in and gives meaning to nearly everything he beholds. Lewis Thomas was Chairman of the Department of Pathology and Dean at Yale Medical School and President of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. The Lives of a Cell won a National Book Award in 1974. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kathleen | 2/12/2014

    " so far it's amazing (i'm only 12 pages in though :) ) "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ross | 1/1/2014

    " It has been a long time since I read this book. Perhaps I would enjoy it more now. I will put it down on the list to read again soon. His writing is rather like that of Stephen Jay Gould. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Surya | 12/13/2013

    " If you want to see why language, ants, pheremones and buildings are pure magic, I recommend this one. Reflections on biology that approximate an understanding of god. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alan | 12/7/2013

    " What I wish I could write if I only had a brain, I'd while a way the hours . . . while conversing with the flowers . "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Matthew Hurley | 11/27/2013

    " Still good, but not as good as The Youngest Science, or even The Medusa and the Snail: More Notes of a Biology Watcher. Just too much evolutionary hogwash. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jill | 11/13/2013

    " Oh you science-y friends will appreciate this -- in another life, this would've been me. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Richard Stern | 10/25/2013

    " Fantastic biology book for a layman such as myself. The author gives you an almost spritual appreciation for nature. I found it quote meaningful recomended to anyone. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sharon Hanlon | 10/22/2013

    " I read this in high school and loved it. I have since read bits and pieces and still enjoy it a lot. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Evans McGowan | 10/12/2013

    " A dated but still enjoyable and surprisingly pertinent book of random ecological essays. Not for everyone, but for those interested in musings about the connectedness of life on a cellular level (and willing to read dated material), it still is enjoyable. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Brittany Petruzzi | 4/13/2013

    " Lewis Thomas makes science accessible, exciting, and massively interesting for those of us who have trouble making it so on our own. This collection of essays is no exception. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Morgan Sidky | 10/8/2012

    " Extremely interesting; my favourite kind of science book: speculative/philosophical. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sean Godfrey | 5/20/2012

    " you should just read it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 jasmine | 11/6/2009

    " Random and interesting scientific facts. Not bad of a read since science can sometimes if not often be something that goes over the heads of the majority. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Adrian Colesberry | 5/25/2009

    " Read this in high school along with Medusa and the Snail. Amazing essays. Lewis Thomas made me love biology. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Brian | 5/15/2009

    " After a while, you get used to Lewis Thomas as a sort of pleasant neighbor. Sadly mistaken in numerous places, but very pleasant. He is at his best discussing our preoccupations with health and (I think) at his worst discussing our 'social lives'. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Katya | 11/12/2008

    " insightful. the introduction, that is. unfortunately couldn't quite get beyond that point. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kirsten Chmielewski | 10/5/2008

    " Assigned as extra credit in AP Bio-this book is awesome! Little vignettes about how the cell is like a world unto itself. Thomas has such a different view of things, including science. This book is a mind opener and you can read it in little pieces. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Elena | 9/25/2007

    " I loved this book and have read and re-read it many times over the past 20 years. Thomas' fantastic description of the mitochondrion as the energy powerhouse of the cell was probably my first introduction to the molecular world. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jake Berlin | 3/22/2006

    " some of the best non-fiction science writing you can find. thomas is a brilliant wordsmith -- the language somehow rises to the level of the ideas themselves. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cynthia | 6/15/2005

    " The first of its kind. Very good. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jim Duncan | 3/28/2005

    " Easy to see why this is a classic. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ragan | 12/6/2002

    " This book contains a bunch of essays on biology. Now I know what you may be thinking, "Boring!" But they aren't. The essays are very interesting, surprising, and sometimes funny. It is well worth the read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tom | 11/12/2002

    " A decisive work in providing imagery and facts necessary to begin thinking of humans as ecosystems rather than organisms. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Helen | 4/26/2002

    " not ashamed to let my geek flag fly with this read. want to enjoy again in the near future! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Miranda | 8/16/2000

    " This year, when I introduced my students to this book, many went out and purchased it. This book of essay about science and man are easy to read, clever, and have heart and soul; really these essays touch on what it means to be human. "

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About the Author
Author Lewis Thomas

Lewis Thomas (1913–1993) was born in New York. He earned a bachelor’s degree at Princeton and a doctorate in medicine in 1937. He went on to become professor of pediatric research at the University of Minnesota, chairman of the Departments of Pathology and Medicine and also dean at the New York University—Bellevue Medical Center, chairman of the Department of Pathology and dean at Yale Medical School, and president of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. His now classic book, The Lives of a Cell, won the National Book Award in 1974.