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Download The Crazed Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Crazed (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Ha Jin
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,173 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Ha Jin Narrator: Norm Lee Publisher: Recorded Books Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2010 ISBN:
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Best-selling, National Book Award-winning author Ha Jin displays his impressive storytelling gifts in this richly textured examination of contemporary China and the civil unrest at Tiananmen Square in 1989.

Professor Yang, a respected literature scholar, suffers a stroke and is confined to a hospital bed. Now Jian Wan, Yang's brightest student and future son-in-law, must suspend his rigorous studies to care for his mentor. Jian dutifully keeps watch as Yang begins raving madly, often pleading with unseen tormentors. Has Yang lost his grip on sanity, or is he no longer capable of hiding deeply buried, painful secrets?

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Yeti | 2/16/2014

    " A brilliant book. Set at the time of the crisis at Tianemen. It's rather simplistic compared to other texts - simplistic structure wise. But the themes he deals with are applicable to everyone. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Marvin | 2/9/2014

    " I thought Ha Jin's Waiting was a work of genius. Again this time it's a book set in communist China where there's little action, and the main character has trouble taking charge of his life, but this character & the other main characters are less appealing & the dialog more stilted. The Tinanamen Massacre plays a role in the story, though a much more incidental one than in The Sons of Heaven. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Liza | 2/3/2014

    " Huh? I remember nothing about this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Larissa | 1/28/2014

    " As of 1/26 reading on my (new) Nook! 1/27 Finished. I liked this. As I read I liked it more. I recalled Lu Xun's "Diary of a Madman." Who was crazed? It is set during the student movement in 89, though only a small part occurs in Beijing. Still, there is a madman calling a warning for the children - and "children" - the next generation - was being manipulated by party members and officials or being mowed down by tanks or gunned down by the army. The author goes so far as to have one of the characters say: China is eating her young. Interesting. One thing I did not like was to switch the names around. I get that there author is an American, writing in English - but I think it is entirely appropriate to use Chinese conventions when writing about China. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mel | 1/21/2014

    " Will definitely be reading more of Ha Jin's work. An enjoyable work that opened my eyes to a subject that I had hitherto never thought much of, the fate and scholarship of Chinese professors under Communist rule. As a bonus, this book features a great explantion of the difference between Chinese poetry and most Western poetry (hint: guess what, the narrator isn't the center of the world). "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Michaelmonson84 | 1/15/2014

    " Ehh. The last two chapters are really good. There were some interesting insights into Chinese culture as well. But I was never really able to connect with the main (or any other) character. There were several unnecessary descriptions of female anatomy too. Nothing too blatant, but certainly not needed to advance plot or establish character and therefore disappointing to find it included. I'd give this one a pass if you're considering it unless you're locked in a room and your only other choices are the Hunger Games or Twilight. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jeffrey | 1/9/2014

    " Not one of his best efforts I'm afraid, but still interesting. A university student is attending the bedside of his professor who is very ill. The professor is lucid only at intervals. There is a peripheral love story that is interesting. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lorraine | 1/6/2014

    " If you want to know how the government of China can control and manipulate people's lives, read this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Beverly | 1/5/2014

    " Indictment of life in Communist CHina; describes the horrs of Tienamen Square. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Liz | 1/2/2014

    " i actually enjoyed this book more than his more famous "waiting." i think i have a soft spot for professors and grad students as characters.... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Courtney | 12/5/2013

    " It took awhile to get into this...slow going, but not bad. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jennifer | 11/28/2013

    " Rather depressing. Not my favorite by Ha Jin. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chrystal | 11/27/2013

    " I love Ha Jin. I read this title in one sitting (um, I was up until 3 am) His works are very straightforward and simple, but filled with insight. This story is about a chinese professor who goes insane and the fallout for those around him. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Christina | 10/20/2013

    " I read this book while travelling through China. What a dissapointment! The book that is, not China. A painfully slow read. Needless to say the book did not make it home with me. I left it for some unlucky traveller to pick up. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Brian | 5/30/2013

    " Some troubled and interesting characters in this one. I think it was one of the first books I've read by a Chinese author, and I really enjoyed learning about some of the social turmoil of China in the late 20th century. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Manavi Chakravarthy | 11/10/2012

    " This was the first one I read by the author I gave it the high rating because he painted such a picture of the place and people that It was like I lived their lives for not just the duration of the read but also years after . "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Carrie | 11/4/2012

    " A strange little book. Not much "happens" until the end, and even then you think, "that's it?" I'm interested enough to read Ha Jin's most celebrated book, Waiting, though. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tom | 8/21/2012

    " Fictional account of a participant in the Tianenman Square riot in Bejing. Interesting to get the POV of a person from the Chinese culture, and get a picture of the event from the inside. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 shui | 9/25/2011

    " This book only started getting good on the last page. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Valerie | 8/26/2011

    " intriguing...not as good as Waiting... "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 bbbbbbrr | 6/5/2011

    " Its good, if a little bland. Picks up toward the end. Plenty of existential brooding. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Walter | 5/22/2011

    " Well-written but not very interesting. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Cathy | 4/24/2011

    " I could not get into this at all. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Karen | 7/4/2010

    " I enjoyed War Trash more, but I thought this was another excellent book. I love how he gets so close to the characters, that you can understand the society they live in. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Yeti | 3/3/2010

    " A brilliant book. Set at the time of the crisis at Tianemen. It's rather simplistic compared to other texts - simplistic structure wise. But the themes he deals with are applicable to everyone. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Speakswithbears | 12/14/2009

    " This book only started getting good on the last page. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Chrystal | 10/27/2009

    " I love Ha Jin. I read this title in one sitting (um, I was up until 3 am) His works are very straightforward and simple, but filled with insight. This story is about a chinese professor who goes insane and the fallout for those around him. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Roger | 9/16/2009

    " The first book I read by Ha Jin. I will read more.

    "Seek not material gain, but something more significant to your being - something that can make you feel your life is properly used and fulfilled." "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Rebbycarey | 9/12/2009

    " A particularly timely book since the Olympics are happening now and they are in Beijing. This book was pretty small but fascinating - and then took a political turn at the end "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jeffrey | 8/13/2009

    " Not one of his best efforts I'm afraid, but still interesting. A university student is attending the bedside of his professor who is very ill. The professor is lucid only at intervals. There is a peripheral love story that is interesting. "

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About the Author
Author Ha Jin

Ha Jin left his native China in 1985 to attend Brandeis University. He is the author of eight novels, four story collections, a book of essays, and six books of poetry. He received the National Book Award, two PEN/Faulkner Awards, the PEN/Hemingway Award, the Asian American Literary Award, and the Flannery O’Connor Award, among others. His novel War Trash was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. In 2014 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He is director of the creative writing program at Boston University.

About the Narrator

Norm Lee is an actor and producer, known for Badder Up, A Whale for Jonah, and Survivor, Season 74: The Outhouse.