Extended Audio Sample

Download The Closing of the American Mind Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample The Closing of the American Mind (Unabridged), by Allan Bloom
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (2,078 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Allan Bloom Narrator: Christopher Hurt Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc. Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 1999 ISBN:
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In one of the most important books of our time, Allan Bloom, a professor of social thought at the University of Chicago and a noted translator of Plato and Rousseau, argues that the social and political crisis of 20th-century America is really an intellectual crisis. Bloom cites everything from the universities' lack of purpose to the students' lack of learning, from the jargon of liberation to the supplanting of reason by so-called creativity. Furthermore, he shows how American democracy has unwittingly played host to vulgarized Continental ideas of nihilism and despair, of relativism disguised as tolerance, while demonstrating that the collective mind of the American university is closed to the very principles of spiritual heritage that gave rise to the university in the first place. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Benjamin | 2/11/2014

    " A book that was probably more resonant in it's time. Bloom has a lot of interesting critiques for the American society of the 80's (which in many ways have not changed, or intensified to his dislike), but the book seems to ramble at times, detracting from the message. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Carlos Anderson | 2/5/2014

    " Even if you don't buy Bloom's ultimate message, his examinations of a wide variety of political and philosophical thought are worth the book's price alone. One chapter is pretty much a cogent summary of Locke's second treatise on government. His commentary on certain moments in history are also worthy reads.jjhik "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Doug May | 1/30/2014

    " One of the most influential books I ever read. A bit distressing in its indictment of modern academia nonetheless better to have your eyes and mind open than to stick them in the sand. This book is definitely a game changer. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John Peebles | 1/25/2014

    " I need to go back and read this book. It was profound when I read it in the late 80's, on the way it attacked the US education system. I would like to see if it still stands up since the whole world has changed with the age of the Internet. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Scott Hayden | 1/17/2014

    " I read this when I was around 20 and didn't get most of it. Since then I've learned that this author is the same name that to educators is a household word. Think, "Bloom's taxonomy." "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Steven Powell | 1/5/2014

    " great satire! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sara | 12/26/2013

    " This was a great, eye-opening book! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jackie Simpson | 12/10/2013

    " pompous "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Troy Parfitt | 11/30/2013

    " Perhaps instead of picking on college kids and their rock and rolling ways, Mr. Bloom should have focused his attention on the dearth of brain power exhibited by educators and rulers, i.e. adults. Young people would be better off if they read more Plato; so would grown ups. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Garrett | 11/23/2013

    " This book is less impressive to me now than it was when I read it as a student, and, as with many conservative arguments, parts of it seem silly in retrospect, but other parts have held up and Bloom makes his arguments better than almost anyone else on the same topics. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Shawn | 8/28/2013

    " Insightful, but prone to gross generalizations, especially when talking about the character of American university students of the 1980's, of whom he has an all-to-idealistic vision. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Eric K. | 7/6/2013

    " From the Foreward: Professor Bloom's book makes me fear that the book of the world, so richly studied by autodidacts, is being closed by the "learned" who are raising walls of opinions to shut the world out. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Dave | 4/7/2013

    " Dated in 2011, though accurately retelling the 80's. Could have been shorter, something like "Kids today...grumble, grumble etc." "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Towens23 | 12/22/2012

    " This book probably did more to define the way I think about americans than any other book I've read. It's very good. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Adrienne Bagnato | 8/12/2012

    " This was a slow read but very interesting. I very much agree with his position but do not see a solution. Incredible that this book sold so many copies - I have to believe that many more copies were sold than were actually read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Charles | 6/24/2012

    " I enjoyed this quite a bit, although it irritated me in places. Maybe that's part of the appeal of such books. There is a lot of good food for thought here though. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Steven | 6/10/2011

    " Yes, yes, and yes. Bloom comes correct. And the sad thing is, many of our post-conservatives are carrying on the liberal legacy of abandoning The True, The Good, and The Beautiful for sociology. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Michael | 5/5/2011

    " This book didn't just change my mind... it shaped it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Eddie | 5/2/2011

    " His main thesis is that the intellectual base of our best college students is being narrowed and needs to be restored by a classical liberal education. He goes on to show how the impact of philosophy has caused this narrowing of the mind. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bill | 4/19/2011

    " Read this when it came out. At the time I was very impressed by Bloom's ideas. Haven't gone back to look at them since. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 James | 4/1/2011

    " Great writing, but it's difficult to read all the way through. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Troy | 3/3/2011

    " Perhaps instead of picking on college kids and their rock and rolling ways, Mr. Bloom should have focused his attention on the dearth of brain power exhibited by educators and rulers, i.e. adults. Young people would be better off if they read more Plato; so would grown ups. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rick | 2/15/2011

    " I think American intellectual life is in worse condition than it was in 1987 when this book came out. We are not thinkers; we are Facebookers and digital heads. We'd rather watch American Idol than read a classic novel. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jafar | 1/13/2011

    " How tiresome and pompous you are, Allan Bloom. You make me feel ashamed of agreeing with you occasionally. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Donna | 11/19/2010

    " OUTSTANDING!!! A must read for every American. "

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