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Download The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama Audiobook, by Gwen Ifill Click for printable size audiobook cover
2.9 out of 52.9 out of 52.9 out of 52.9 out of 52.9 out of 5 2.90 (21 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Gwen Ifill Narrator: Gwen Ifill Publisher: Highbridge Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: January 2009 ISBN: 9781598878806
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A veteran journalist illuminates the evolution of the African-American politician and the future of American democracy. Ahe offers incisive profiles of prominent black leaders including President Obama, Newark Mayor Cory Booker, Massachusetts Governor Dev Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Julie Johnson | 2/5/2014

    " I found this to be a very well researched & unbiased book on modern politics by this journalist. I learned a lot, esp. about some of the new upcoming figures, and particularly one who may be running for governor in AL. where I live. Written shortly before Obama was elected, it gives one a better understanding of the fine line that politicans and voters face when it comes to race/gender issues and differences between the civil rights generation and current one. Leaves the reader with questions only the future can answer. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ginny | 2/4/2014

    " Interesting book on the rise of President Obama and sections, chapters on other African-American politicians. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jeremy | 1/31/2014

    " This book was a great disappointment. It failed to teach me much of any utility or freshness. Written almost entirely from journalistic sources, and based on a lot of interviews, it is a staid, standard, static analysis of racial politics, lacking originality and courage, as well as solid prose. Just to give you an example of what awaits you as a reader--her great analytic insight is "sandpaper politics". What's that? The friction that arises when one generation gives up power to the next, or one group takes power from another. Wow. Color me underwhelmed. If you have been reading magazine and newspaper coverage of the election of 2008, you will have nothing to learn from this book. The only virtue that this book has is the chapter length descriptions of some rising black politicians. These would make second tier Vanity Fair or New Yorker profiles, but you will learn somethings you don't know, I bet, about these figures. Also, you will find some astoundingly ignorant quotes from Andrew Young and Al Sharpton. The failure to distinguish (or even, aggressively critique their stupid comments) between a once-great like Young and a never-was like Sharpton is only one example of the lacunae herein. She never mentions the cynical exploitation of Sharpton's cupidity and narcissism by Republicans and Fox News, nor his execrable past statements and actions. This allows her to present him as a prominent voice in black politics without assessing what that says, and how it is figures like Sharpton who hold back mainstream black progress. She needn't agree with my conclusions, but there isn't even a mention of such issues. The Breakthrough is anything but an intellectual breakthrough. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Matthew | 1/30/2014

    " A good look at the achievements of breakthrough African American politicians, but leaves me wondering what's next. At the least, though, an excellent snapshot of current political leaders and their philosophies. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Paula | 1/18/2014

    " Very interesting narrative based on interviews and research about the changes in the political landscape for African Americans, including the generational shift. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alisha | 1/13/2014

    " Definitely a great read. Still, I was more interested in the chapters on race, gender, and legacy politics over the profiles of prominent African-American politicians. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sandy | 1/10/2014

    " Great reflective of race in politics - good and bad - over the last 50 years or so. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Steven | 1/5/2014

    " Great book. Ifill explores the issues clearly and explains cogently. She responds to a lot of the wonderings I've had in the past year or so about race and politics and where we are now. Excellent book, very well written. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sylvie Fox | 1/5/2014

    " The introduction was better than the book. Despite that, it's an interesting exposition on the old guard v the new guard in black leadership. It would have been better as a NYT Sunday Magazine piece. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Keith | 1/3/2014

    " An extended blog post masquerading as a book. So much more could have been done with this book but it again highlights the dangers of insta-history. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Aldafan | 12/24/2013

    " Ann loaned me this, probably wouldn't have picked it myself. The generation difference between the Civil Rights leaders and current leaders (preachers vs. lawyers/busines men/women) was interesting. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Peter | 12/19/2013

    " (1st Kindle book.) Useful as a survey of moderate African-American males rising in politics. Not much depth to looking at impact of change from prior generation of leaders, or if this wave may lack substance such as the "New Liberals" 20 years ago. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Patricia Baquero | 8/23/2012

    " Gwen's writing is matter-of-fact and a quick read. I didn't think she organized her thoughts well throughout her chapters but I did enjoy reading the upcoming African American public servants: Cory Booker and Arthur Davis. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jessica Gadsden | 5/3/2012

    " The introduction was better than the book. Despite that, it's an interesting exposition on the old guard v the new guard in black leadership. It would have been better as a NYT Sunday Magazine piece. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Milette | 11/4/2011

    " It was a a book to skim through. It gave a racially motivated persective on ploitics. We are not "post-racial" in this country as predicted. I read it now to see if her predictions were correct. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Leslie | 10/21/2011

    " A good intro book on black politics and it's main actors. This is a safe and mild discussion on "Race" politics in the USA. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Marianne V | 10/10/2011

    " Interesting discussion of the changing role of African Americans in the U.S. political system. Ifill interviewed many of the current and former heavy weights in politics and governance and sketches the careers and focus of many of the "new" players. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ralph | 7/11/2011

    " Not really a book but a who's who of the next wave of African American politicians. Unfortunately it only dedicates a few pages to each one and remains a rather shallow analysis. It also seems a bit out of date despite being published this year. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ronnie | 2/25/2011

    " This book attempts to demonstrate how current African American political leaders differ from the leaders of the civil rights movement. It reads like a who's who of current and up-and-coming African American politicos. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ruth | 11/2/2010

    " This book was interesting but not stunning. I listened to the author reading it and though I really like her on TV, I didn't love her as narrator. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 SweetPea | 7/30/2010

    " Quick read with some interesting insights into how Obama's election impacted politics. "

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