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Download Mythologies: The Complete Edition, in a New Translation Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Mythologies: The Complete Edition, in a New Translation Audiobook, by Roland Barthes Click for printable size audiobook cover
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (5,493 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Roland Barthes Narrator: John Lee Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: March 2012 ISBN: 9781452676197
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What is astrology? Fiction for the bourgeoisie. The Tour de France? An epic. The brain of Einstein? Knowledge reduced to a formula. Like iconic images of movie stars or the rhetoric of politicians, they are fabricated. Once isolated from the events that gave birth to them, these "mythologies" appear for what they are: the ideology of mass culture. When Roland Barthes's groundbreaking Mythologies first appeared in English in 1972, it was immediately recognized as one of the most significant works in French theory—yet nearly half of the essays from the original work were missing. This new edition of Mythologies is the first complete, authoritative English version of the French classic. It includes the brilliant "Astrology," never published in English before.Mythologies is a lesson in clairvoyance. In a new century where the virtual dominates social interactions and advertisement defines popular culture, it is more relevant than ever. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “[Mythologies] illustrates the beautiful generosity of Barthes’ progressive interest in the meaning (his word is signification) of practically everything around him.”

    Edward W. Said, literary theorist, author of Orientalism

  • “John Lee provides superb narration…As a narrator, he is one of the most intriguing elements of this audiobook.”

    Publishers Weekly Audio Review

  • [Mythologies] illustrates the beautiful generosity of Barthes's progressive interest in the meaning (his word is signification) of practically everything around him. Edward W. Said

Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jessica Fure | 2/3/2014

    " I've been terrified of this book for years, and I've been wrong to be afraid. This is intuitive theory; easy to read, easy to understand - almost an articulation of thoughts you haven't quite fully formed. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rosie | 1/27/2014

    " Oh, my. Just read the part about soap/detergent. Such lucid tiny analyses of the particles of material stuff that make up our daily reality. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Linda Sunderland | 1/19/2014

    " Barthes demonstrates the deconstruction of the cultural artifacts of everyday life, illustrating the way that power relationships are perpetuated in society. This is an important book, influential in all fields that have to do with communication and culture. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Corinne Wahlberg | 12/20/2013

    " A friend of mine bought this for my 22nd birthday. 3ish years later I finish. I love reading essays on pop culture, even if the culture is past. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brendan | 12/12/2013

    " Good, apart from the socialism. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Stacie | 12/12/2013

    " I found that many of Barthes insights in the 1950's are very relevant today. I have never in my life enjoyed reading any type of theory as I did these essays. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lucy | 12/1/2013

    " Barthes dissects the bourgeoisie. These essays are absolutely amazing. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Fernando Chaves | 11/26/2013

    " Although too centered on France, these reflections on the myths that abound in our pop culture are very interesting. Some of Barthes' observations apply to contemporary phenomenons in other countries. A necessary reading for pop culture lovers like myself :P "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 John Spillane | 9/13/2013

    " Wow, what a whole bunch of nothing. I could elaborate, but won't. How this got a new edition is beyond me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Maximillian | 7/19/2013

    " I read the translation version, and It's not so good. But when I tried the review from genuine version, it's nice book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 M. Suliman | 7/2/2013

    " Three stars and a half "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 StrangeBedfellows | 6/9/2013

    " If you're interested in some thoughtful reading, this is a good choice. Barthes' ideas are relevant, intriguing, and very useful for literature studies. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kate | 6/1/2013

    " This was assigned reading for my English class and it has opened up the whole world to me. Now I am analysing everything and it is a superb existence. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Angus | 3/2/2013

    " I always knew that wrestling was fake but now I know why. Awesome! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tom | 2/4/2013

    " Read about half of it and the final major essay in Fosso's Lit theory course (Fall 2010). Intersesting stuff "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Meg | 1/10/2013

    " french philosophers are my favorite because they anticipate your counter-argument, and propose a refutation even in text. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Xio | 1/10/2013

    " I just think it's such fun to read this & Lovers Discourse. In my perfect (ha) World (in my mind) there could be people with whom you might communicate but using the language-meaning specific to a single book... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jennifer | 1/8/2013

    " More brilliant, interesting, readable essays...on popular culture-ish topics! Fun! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Geraldine Kim | 10/25/2012

    " i think this should be under poetry "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Richard | 5/23/2012

    " Has not aged well. Worth reading for Einstein's Brain though "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Alan | 4/27/2012

    " read at college so many years ago, but remember the esays on steak and chips etc.. semiotics can be fun. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Verbaladventure | 4/22/2012

    " not just a theory book, a life book. barthes has revolutionized the way i view the world "

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About the Author
Author Roland Barthes

Roland Barthes (1915–1980) was a French literary theorist, philosopher, and critic. He influenced the development of a variety of schools of thought, including structuralism, semiotics, existentialism, social theory, Marxism, and post-structuralism. His best-known works include Writing Degree Zero, The Pleasure of the Text, and Elements of Semiology.

About the Narrator

John Lee has read more than 100 audiobooks. His work has garnered multiple Earphones Awards and won AudioFile‘s Best Voice in Fiction & Classics in both 2008 and 2009. He also narrates video games, does voice-over work, and writes plays. He is an accomplished stage actor and has written and co-produced the feature films Breathing Hard and Forfeit. He played Alydon in the 1963–64 Doctor Who serial The Daleks.