Download Meet You in Hell: Andrew Carnegie, Henry Clay Frick, and the Bitter Partnership that Transformed America Audiobook

Meet You in Hell: Andrew Carnegie, Henry Clay Frick, and the Bitter Partnership that Transformed America Audiobook, by Les Standiford Extended Sample Click for printable size audiobook cover
Author: Les Standiford Narrator: John H. Mayer Publisher: Random House Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: May 2005 ISBN: 9781415925621
3.0062441314554 out of 53.0062441314554 out of 53.0062441314554 out of 53.0062441314554 out of 53.0062441314554 out of 5 3.01 (426 ratings) (rate this audio book)
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Two founding fathers of American industry. One desire to dominate business at any price. “Masterful . . . Standiford has a way of making the 1890s resonate with a twenty-first-century audience.”—USA Today “The narrative is as absorbing as that of any good novel—and as difficult to put down.”—Miami Herald The author of Last Train to Paradise tells the riveting story of Andrew Carnegie, Henry Clay Frick, and the bloody steelworkers’ strike that transformed their fabled partnership into a furious rivalry. Set against the backdrop of the Gilded Age, Meet You in Hell captures the majesty and danger of steel manufacturing, the rough-and-tumble of the business world, and the fraught relationship between “the world’s richest man” and the ruthless coke magnate to whom he entrusted his companies. The result is an extraordinary work of popular history. Praise for Meet You in Hell “To the list of the signal relationships of American history . . . we can add one more: Andrew Carnegie and Henry Clay Frick . . . The tale is deftly set out by Les Standiford.”Wall Street Journal “Standiford tells the story with the skills of a novelist . . . a colloquial style that is mindful of William Manchester’s great The Glory and the Dream.Pittsburgh Tribune-Review “A muscular, enthralling read that takes you back to a time when two titans of industry clashed in a battle of wills and egos that had seismic ramifications not only for themselves but for anyone living in the United States, then and now.”—Dennis Lehane, author of Mystic River  Download and start listening now!

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Listener Reviews

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  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Karen | 2/20/2014

    " This book had been on my Amazon WishList for a while, but I was really pushed to read it by watching "The Men Who Built America" on The History Channel. Either I wasn't paying close attention or the script writers for History only got the Cliffs Notes version, because this book told quite a different story of the eventual falling out between Carnegie and Frick. There's quite a bit of insight into character and motivations, as well as highlights of the early years of the labor movement (quite timely). Interesting that, considering their treatment of employees, both men spent substantial sums for the public good; Carnegie through his libraries (my hometown had one) and institutes, and Frick with his museum and gifts to universities and hospitals. Kind of reminds me of the Charles Schulz quote - "I love mankind; it's people I can't stand." "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brian | 2/15/2014

    " Good. like AC/DC gets lost in the chronology at the end. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nancy | 2/6/2014

    " A great companion to any biography of Carnegie or Frick. I felt like I was watching a soap opera. A really enjoyable book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tom | 1/19/2014

    " Mo money, mo problems, mo exploited workers. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amanda | 12/17/2013

    " Andrew Carnegie, you complicated figure. Inspired to read because of History channel's Men Who Built America series. I appreciate that the author strove for a balanced account of the events of Homestead and Carnegie and Frick's partnership, more so than the TV show. A rather important time that gets overlooked being sandwiched between the Civil War and WWI. Well researched and a solid narrator. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Patrick | 12/16/2013

    " A good easy read for basic knowledge of the relationship between two of the most powerful business men from the gilded age. A must read for those living in the rough blue collar Mon River Valley. Carnegie's first mill, Edgar Thomson Works, continues to make steel today. The book gives the reader a look into "the best and worst of times." "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jennifer | 12/3/2013

    " This book was SLOW!!! Interesting story but the author did a poor job...too wordy. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Lori | 11/26/2013

    " Wonderful read - although the author was not a historian, I felt it was well written and accurate. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rich | 11/26/2013

    " Spoiler Alert: Neither of them were particularly nice guys. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gail | 11/3/2013

    " This book is for anyone who wants to know more about the titans of business in the late 19th C. They became as rich as Bill Gates today! Very interesting. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Melissa | 9/9/2013

    " Facinating story, one that I had never heard. The author does a pretty good job staying neutral, not siding with the workers, or the owners. The writing was a little dry, but hey its a book about business. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Erin | 8/21/2013

    " Stalled on this one when I picked up other things for book club, but really was enjoying the look at two of America's greatest industrialists. Will just finished it and really liked it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ann | 8/18/2013

    " What a great book about the tycoons of that era and their ruthless pursuit for power and money. Strong recommendation from me. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Scott | 1/12/2013

    " Well researched and intriguing story between 2 powerful men, but lacks a certain lasting punch. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Christine | 12/7/2012

    " Really concise account of Carnegie's rise in the business world, the making of steel/iron, the workingman's conditions, and the strike at Homestead works in Pittsburgh. I didn't know ANY of this history, besides knowing Carnegie's name, so this was really insightful and interesting. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gail | 10/28/2012

    " One book by Les Standiford will lead you to another book by Les Standiford. One can't resist his quirky call. A nice small-scaled study of these two outsized characters -- bastards both, though Carnegie managed to do a lot of postumous mopping up of his mess. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Robert | 10/18/2012

    " This book was a little anticlimactic in regards to the Carnegie/Frick relationship but the story of the strike was well done. If I could, I would give this book 3.5 stars. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Converse | 11/21/2011

    " Oddly bad, in that the writing is good but the point that the author is trying to make unclear. At points he seems to say that the Homestead strike caused the falling out between Carnegie & Frick, but his own chronology of the partnership suggests otherwise "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jpavalock | 8/16/2011

    " Growing up in Pennsylvania, I know the names Carnegie and Frick, but had no idea they were connected in business. I think I'm going to like it. I'll let you know! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Joe | 6/13/2011

    " Excellent profiles of two of the richest, most powerful men who rode the crest of America's "Golden Age" right over the bodies of the Homewood strikers, among others. Portrait of unbridled greed and its rationalizations. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Barry | 5/29/2011

    " nonfiction reading lie a novel. interesting picture of robber barons. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Dan | 4/28/2011

    " Incredibly well written. It really paints a vivid picture of the complex relationship between Carnegie and Frick, and how these two great business titans created the Steel industry in America, and the American Economy as a world power. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Coleen | 3/21/2011

    " An interesting discussion of the mergers that became US Steel and the men who made them and what ha[[ened to their relationship. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jpavalock | 1/27/2011

    " Growing up in Pennsylvania, I know the names Carnegie and Frick, but had no idea they were connected in business. I think I'm going to like it. I'll let you know! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Barry | 11/26/2010

    " nonfiction reading lie a novel. interesting picture of robber barons. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Marcy | 9/28/2010

    " Very interesting topic.
    Writing was good, but not great. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 William | 9/26/2010

    " Carnegie vs Frick vs steel workers. An engaging overview of the wild days of American capitalism and how greed has its consequences. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Bernie | 8/28/2010

    " Enlightening but should be contrastd to the story of George Westinghouse and his treatment of the workers who contributed to the progress and success of this era. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kelly | 7/6/2010

    " Continued fuel for my distaste with Corporate America. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chris | 5/9/2010

    " Standiford links the events of the late 19th century to today. As someone originally from western Pennsylvania, this book is all the more relevant. Both the facts and the human side of the early steel and coke industries are part of this story. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Converse | 4/8/2010

    " Oddly bad, in that the writing is good but the point that the author is trying to make unclear. At points he seems to say that the Homestead strike caused the falling out between Carnegie & Frick, but his own chronology of the partnership suggests otherwise
    "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tom | 11/22/2009

    " Mo money, mo problems, mo exploited workers. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Barbara | 7/19/2009

    " I enjoy history, that's why I chose this book but I found it a little dry. Didn't really go into the personal character of Carnegie or Frick. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Gail | 4/22/2009

    " One book by Les Standiford will lead you to another book by Les Standiford. One can't resist his quirky call. A nice small-scaled study of these two outsized characters -- bastards both, though Carnegie managed to do a lot of postumous mopping up of his mess. "

About the Author

Les Standiford is the author of several critically acclaimed books, including Last Train to Paradise, Meet You in Hell, and Bringing Adam Home. His book, The Man Who Invented Christmas, was a New York Times ‘Editors’ Choice’ and was made into a feature film starring Christopher Plummer and Dan Stevens in 2018. He is a professor of English and founding director of the creative writing program at Florida International University and holds a MA and PhD in literature and creative writing from the University of Utah. He attended the US Air Force Academy and Columbia School of Law and is a former screenwriting fellow and graduate of the American Film Institute in Los Angeles.

About the Narrator

John H. Mayer, author and Earphones Award–winning narrator, is a character actor whose voice has been heard on numerous commercials, animated programs, audiobooks, and narrations including E! Entertainment’s Celebrity Profiles. He was a five-year member of the Groundlings comedy theater company in Los Angeles. He is also the co-author of Radio Rocket Boy, an award-winning short film.