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Extended Audio Sample Love and Summer Audiobook, by William Trevor Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (1,557 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: William Trevor Narrator: Jim Norton Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 2009 ISBN: 9781440779909
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It’s summer and nothing much is happening in Rathmoye. So it doesn’t go unnoticed when a dark-haired stranger appears on his bicycle and begins photographing the mourners at Mrs. Connulty’s funeral. Florian Kilderry couldn’t know that the Connultys are said to own half the town: he has only come to Rathmoye to photograph the scorched remains of its burnt-out cinema.

A few miles out in the country, Dillahan, a farmer and a decent man, has married again: Ellie is the young convent girl who came to work for him when he was widowed. Ellie leads a quiet, routine life, often alone while Dillahan runs the farm. 

Florian is planning to leave Ireland and start over. Ellie is settled in her new role as Dillahan’s wife. But Florian’s visit to Rathmoye introduces him to Ellie, and a dangerously reckless attachment begins.

In a characteristically masterly way, Trevor evokes the passions and frustrations felt by Ellie and Florian, and by the people of a small Irish town during one long summer. 

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Quotes & Awards

  • “A delicate sort of drama—there is no corpse in the basement, no bomb lies hidden in any drawer—but even so, a reader will have his heart in his mouth for the last fifty pages. And when the heart settles back down, it will be broken and satisfied…A thrilling work of art.”

    New York Times Book Review

  • “When Trevor chooses to leave the inner mind of a character, he lingers on aspects of the physical world, and in this way we live where these people do. He lingers over the way that Miss Connulty prepares food for her overnight lodgers. He lingers on Ellie’s own domestic duties, and on the dogs that are part of the Dillahan farm. He lingers on the moments that tell us the summer is moving by. Mostly, and most important, what Trevor does is make us believe and care…This is what we feel in Trevor’s strong, able, and exquisitely gentle storytelling hands.”

    Washington Post

  • “It’s from the subtle yet ferocious specificity of this story that its power rises…The ordinary throughout is presented as instances of paradise just about to be reached. That Trevor allows his characters so much is not only due to the innate generosity for which he is justly worshipped as a writer, but to a new grace again, something further, that marks this book as particular, miraculous; in it old matters are made new, transformed, redeemed.”

    Guardian (London)

  • “Masterful…His prose precisely nuanced and restrained, Trevor depicts a society beginning to loosen itself from the Church’s implacable condemnation of sexual immorality.”

    Publishers Weekly (starred review)

  • “Jim Norton captures the ache and longing that permeate William Trevor’s marvelous new novel…Trevor has written a timeless tale of love found, lost, and perhaps found again. Set in rural Ireland among farmers of few words and watchful shopkeepers, the story is sharp, sweet, and painfully perceptive. Norton uses just enough vocal variations for us to keep the characters straight and narrates in an accent subtly influenced by the Emerald Isle. His tone, at once gentle and solemn, would suit the recitation of a myth, which of course, this is.”

    AudioFile

  • “Trevor…matches an exquisite but never precious prose style with wise psychological understanding of the fluster beneath the surface of ordinary lives…Extraordinary.”

    Booklist

  • “Trevor’s latest is rich in dazzling imagery, especially variations on light, illumination, and reflection, and unforgettable character…Another masterly work from one of our greatest contemporary novelists.”

    Library Journal

  • “The poignancy of life worn down at the elbows, Trevor’s signature note, gently animates another masterpiece…An archetypal Irish love story and a perfect novel—sweet, desperate, sad, unforgettable.”

    Kirkus Reviews (starred reviews)

  • A New York Times Bestseller
  • Longlisted for the 2009 Man Booker Prize
  • Shortlisted for the 2011 International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award
  • One of the 2009 New York Times Book Review 100 Notable Books for Fiction

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Daniel | 2/5/2014

    " Sigh. Do books like this get more or less painful as you grow older? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anne | 2/3/2014

    " I have always enjoyed William Trevor's writing. He has a real ability to flesh out characters. This is a gentle slow moving tale but full of small inspirations "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mary Beth | 2/3/2014

    " I am very fond of his writing and his style. Having said that, this was not one of his finest efforts. Worthwhile though. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Jessica | 1/31/2014

    " horridly boring, torturous even. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Shawn | 1/30/2014

    " Beautiful writing. I was previously unfamiliar with Trevor's work. Although it is a slight novel at 220+ pages, reading this book for me became a gentle, quiet pleasure. Trevor is an elegant, evocative writer...his prose sweeps you gracefully up and carries you along with its finely observed, poetic specificity. It's a bittersweet tale. Melancholic, Post-War Irish. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Carolyn | 1/23/2014

    " an enjoyable, quiet little book. basic plot concerns a love affair (left unconsummated until the very end --again, think quiet) in a small irish village. trevor makes great use of "will-the-husband-find-out" tension and manages to resolve a story of passion and betrayal in a fresh way. a great read if you're sick of over-the-top storylines and prose. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sarah | 1/17/2014

    " This was a quiet little book-- should the woman follow the man she falls in love with, or stay with her husband, a man of quiet grief? It was well written but didn't really capture me. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Corey | 1/11/2014

    " A quiet, meditative book about love and memory. Trevor builds his subtle story with silence and illuminated small moments hiding hidden depths. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Eric | 12/17/2013

    " Sadly beautiful. In just over 200 pps Trevor weaves several moving strands of loss and regret. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Grace | 12/13/2013

    " Beautifully written book that has left me with some lingering questions. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jen | 11/6/2013

    " Excellent, another fine one from trevor. He can say so much with so few words. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Hank | 11/2/2013

    " I found this book to be so boring that it's a miracle that I managed to finish it. I guess my hate for not finishing a book that I've started got the better of me. The story has a few emotional moments but, mostly, I just didn't get it. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shelley | 11/1/2013

    " What beautiful prose, what painterly attention to detail and emotions. I wanted it to go on and on. An exquisite portrayal of a vanished Ireland. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Lacey | 6/11/2013

    " This was alright. Large portions that were useless. Editted down, this would have made a much better short story. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jennifer | 5/6/2013

    " I adore everything William Trevor writes, and while this wasn't my favorite of his work, it was beautifully written. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 June | 1/14/2013

    " Such a simple, genuine friendship turned to love, and written with such insight into the hearts and minds of small town villages--a beautiful and tender suprise ending. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Debra Dannheisser | 12/2/2012

    " Love William Trevor. I moving story of a small town and forbidden love. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kathy Bringardner | 8/17/2012

    " I liked this book, it is a gentle, beautifully written love story. I don't think it has quite the punch that Lucy Gault had, but still a pleasant read "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Sandra Lawson | 6/16/2012

    " Another elegaic tale that leaves you wondering what could have happened if William Trevor had taken different turns in his narrative. He beautifully evokes summertime rural Ireland in the middle of the last century and leaves you with a sad ache when you put the book down. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jane Button | 1/31/2012

    " It took a while for me to warm up to this book, and I had to set it aside and start it again but it was a nice (albeit a little sad) story about love. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Sheila | 3/19/2011

    " A gem. It is very short and beautifully written. The Irish scenery is so well described that you feel you are there. The characters are so sympathetic you want to meet them. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anna | 2/25/2011

    " I read this in one afternoon. It was a great afternoon. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Theresa | 12/27/2010

    " Exquisite understanding of the human heart. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Hannah | 11/28/2010

    " Subtlety is lost on me. And so was most of this book. If something happened, just TELL me it happened already! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Jennifer Reininger | 11/21/2010

    " After everything I read about this book, I felt very let down. While I found it to be very beautifully written, I could not get excited about any aspect of the story. It reminded me a lot of Carson McCullers...I know it's great literature, I know I should love it, but I really have no interest. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Laurie Lemson | 8/23/2010

    " I LOVE this man's writing! I wish he were more prolific. The Story of Lucy Gault, Felicia's Journey and this one were all beautiful. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Katie | 6/28/2010

    " I love William Trevor. This story is so sad, and beautifully written, though not his most polished. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Karen | 6/15/2010

    " William Trevor. A class by himself. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lauren Albert | 4/30/2010

    " I didn't love this book at first. But it came together for me as it drew to a close. Trevor's portrayal of Miss Connulty and her regret, and her love and fear for Ellie who she hardly knows, is masterful. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kathryn | 4/24/2010

    " Winner of the 1983 Whitbread Award. A sad lyrical tale about the tragedies suffered by an Ango-Irish family in the years following World War I. I am glad to have discovered the remarkable William Trevor. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tuck | 9/21/2009

    " great old style novel of ireland and england after WW1. in style of banville, mcguane, and gardam, slow, steady, but poignant. (really, the precedding are in the style of william trevor) "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Eileen | 3/30/2008

    " The first William Trevor I read. Now I will read anything this author writes. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jean | 1/27/2008

    " Beautiful writing. Terribly sad story. The short novel is rather demanding and requires patient reading, but its themes and ideas are worth pondering. Set in Ireland, it concerns an Anglo-Irish family affected in a tragic way by the "troubles" of the uprising against British rule. "

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About the Author
Author William Trevor

William Trevor is the author of nearly thirty books, including Felicia’s Journey, which won the Whitbread Book of the Year Award and was made into a major motion picture. In 1996 he was the recipient of the Lannan Award for Fiction, and in 2001 he won the Irish Times Literature Prize for Fiction. Two of his books were chosen by the New York Times as best books of the year, and his short stories appear regularly in the New Yorker. In 1997 he was named Honorary Commander of the British Empire. He lives in Devon, England.

About the Narrator

Jim Norton, one of Ireland’s leading actors, has worked regularly on Joycean topics—and particularly Ulysses—during his long career. Born and brought up in Dublin, he spent his early acting years in Irish radio and quickly moved on to film, television, and theater. Norton won a 2007 Olivier Award and a 2008 Tony Award for The Seafarer and has appeared in The Weir, for which he was nominated for a Tony; Finian’s Rainbow; Juno and the Paycock; Dublin Carol; and Port Authority, among many others acclaimed stage productions. Film appearances include Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, Water for Elephants, Straw Dogs, Hidden Agenda, Driving Lessons, and The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas. Norton has also recorded many audiobooks and the complete works of James Joyce for Naxos AudioBooks, which won a Sony Award.