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Extended Audio Sample Lies, Inc. Audiobook, by Philip K. Dick Click for printable size audiobook cover
2.74 out of 52.74 out of 52.74 out of 52.74 out of 52.74 out of 5 2.74 (31 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Philip K. Dick Narrator: Luke Daniels Publisher: Brilliance Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: October 2011 ISBN: 9781455832194
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When catastrophic overpopulation threatens Earth, one company offers to teleport citizens to Whale’s Mouth, an allegedly pristine new home for happy and industrious émigrés. But there is one problem: the teleportation machine works in only one direction. When Rachmael ben Applebaum discovers that some of the footage of happy settlers may have been faked, he sets out on an eighteen-year journey to see if anyone wants to come back. Lies, Inc. is one of Philip K. Dick’s final novels, which he expanded from his novella The Unteleported Man shortly before his death. In its examination of totalitarianism, reality, and hallucination, it encompasses everything that Dick’s fans love about his oeuvre. Download and start listening now!

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ian | 2/13/2014

    " The narrative sort of breaks down in the middle. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Sara Elice | 2/11/2014

    " I hate to say I really didn't like this book, but it's the honest truth. The book was written in two pieces, with the second piece being shoved into the middle two-thirds of the original and providing half the text of the book as a whole. The later addition is incredibly hard to follow, if only because it's boring to read and I found myself reading a whole paragraph just to get through it and not internalizing any of it. But also, it starts discussing things in Dick's sort of made-up drug terminology - paraworlds and the like, in a way that is never clearly defined and fairly unintelligible. The timeline is also such that it's very hard to tell what is happening in what order and what if anything is real or not for several of the characters. What is interesting, is that although there is a reference to someone being dosed with LSD, for the most part, what may or may not be hallucinations are not necessarily linked to drugs. Except with his other novel dealing with hallucinations and confusion, A Scanner Darkly, you understand why the characters are experiencing weird visions and occurrences, even if you don't understand the particulars of the visions. Here, there is no understanding of why the visions exist or why they are what they are - or who is behind it and why exactly. The existence of a garrison state meant to create supersoldiers, which seems to be the actual reality on Whale's Mouth (but I don't know, is it?) has nothing to do with this small group of people living in an enclosed space experiencing different realities...who are these few, why are they there, why should we care? It's all so irrelevant to the emotional plot of the book I just couldn't wait for it to end and for the "real" story to continue. The original story, taken without the addition is written in a much clearer style and is easier to take in and much more enjoyable to read. You actually care about the characters here. Except, that things are still shifted in timeline and it's unclear to me exactly what happened in what order - what were the causal relationships between the scenes...I wish I understood. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Phil | 1/21/2014

    " PKD should have left well enough alone and not attempted to expand the "Unteleported Man", a fine novella, into a full-scale novel. But of course, Dick was pretty much stark raving mad by the time he finished this project. The expanded book is worthwhile if one is willing to gloss over chapters 8-15, which is one half of the end product. I'm not sure there is a lot to be gained by poring over the middle 100 pages of outright psychotic thought. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Keysersoze | 1/4/2014

    " The version I read has the original story (title The Unteleported Man), along with 100 pages inserted that PKD wrote after he went insane. Very disconcerting seeing the two combined that way, made me wonder what it must've been like for people who knew PKD throughout his life. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Byron 'Giggsy' Paul | 12/27/2013

    " good, but I definitely prefer the original novella this was based on, Unteleported Man "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Mark | 12/25/2013

    " Disappointing. The afterword, which I wish had been the foreword, explained that this was Dick's expansion of an earlier novel, The Unteleported Man. The original novel, a mere 100 pages, was the part I liked. The added-on section (another 100 pages), which Dick inserted into the middle of the book, started exactly where I started to lose interest in the book. His obsession with LSD, hallucinations, and subjective experience--usually interesting in books like A Scanner Darkly, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, UBIK, etc.--didn't work here. I can see why the original publisher of The Unteleported Man wasn't interested in republishing it with Dick's added material. He was creative, and prolific, but he did write a few duds. Lies, Inc., as an expansion, is one of those duds. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 John | 12/19/2013

    " Police state. Narcotics. Entire chapters that make no sense. This could have been fairly interesting, but it came from related two books, was cobbled together, and no one bothered to add all the missing cobbles. Read electtric sheep or a scanner darkly instead. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tom | 10/8/2013

    " This is one of Dick's trippier novels, particularly about halfway through when an LSD dart comes into play. Wild ride if you're willing to take the trip. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lucas | 9/10/2013

    " The best part of this book is the very well done and vivid LSD scene, very well done. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kristin | 5/22/2013

    " This book started out awesome and then it just lost me. I really thought it was going to be better. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Jillian | 4/18/2013

    " got lost and eventually bored "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ned | 4/3/2013

    " really twisted. definitely hard reading for me, but definitely a Phil Dick novel. the LSD section is especially mind-bending (nyuk, nyuk). "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Colin | 1/24/2013

    " Most of the Philip K Dick books I've read have had a number of strange occurrences within them but without giving anything away, this one goes really weird about three quarters of the way through. Characters end up in strange places and I'm still not sure I understand who went where :) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Zach | 6/17/2012

    " Chilly sci-fi. Really ambigous literature; reminiscent of Heart of Darkness, but much more disorienting. Is the protaganist psychotic? Great read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tedb0t | 5/14/2012

    " I would like to have met Philip K. Dick, just to get a feel for how fucking insane he really was. And maybe to have tripped with him. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Brenna | 5/10/2012

    " I would have enjoyed this book more if I could have used the middle section to kindle a fire by which to warm my lost and confused self upon reading it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ralph McEwen | 10/18/2011

    " This book was written in two parts and it reads like it. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bridgett | 8/28/2011

    " Another strange book by Philip K. Dick. I liked it, but got confused in parts. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jamie | 8/19/2011

    " This book is a trip. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 sid | 8/7/2011

    " Interesting enough for a 'listening in the car' book, but not as good as some of his other ones. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Zachary | 8/4/2011

    " The disjointed method of writing shows. There is more unnecessary confusion than the standard PDK novel, and that is saying something.



    Of course, there are some very interesting ideas. If you are a PDK fan, read it, but then again, you would anyway. Hold on to your eyes. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Deb | 7/6/2011

    " Confusing and just not very good. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Ryan | 4/14/2011

    " The writing was decent enough.
    It was too confused on what it was trying to achieve.
    The plot was confusing and more than once I had no idea what was going on. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Jason | 3/20/2011

    " I can't believe I'm going to say this about one of my favorite sci-fi authors: This is one of the most BORING novels he has ever written. Avoid at all costs. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Patrick | 2/28/2011

    " Middling PKD, can't really blame him though because he died before he could successfully link the middle half of the book with the beginning and the end. Lots of loose ends -- the whole rat/Abba, time travel, and identity-switching things remained unresolved/unexplored. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ned | 1/2/2011

    " really twisted. definitely hard reading for me, but definitely a Phil Dick novel. the LSD section is especially mind-bending (nyuk, nyuk). "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 John | 11/15/2010

    " Police state. Narcotics. Entire chapters that make no sense. This could have been fairly interesting, but it came from related two books, was cobbled together, and no one bothered to add all the missing cobbles. Read electtric sheep or a scanner darkly instead. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Zach | 11/11/2010

    " Chilly sci-fi. Really ambigous literature; reminiscent of Heart of Darkness, but much more disorienting. Is the protaganist psychotic? Great read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jason | 10/9/2010

    " I'm not sure I know exactly what happened in this book. Reading it is like taking a Timothy Leary-sized dose of psychedelics. A total mind-melter! "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Mrecker | 9/15/2010

    " God awful. What a waste of time. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Benjamin | 8/20/2010

    " This book, published posthumously and made up of material from three different attempts to write this novel (as I understand it), it totally amazing. "

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About the Author
Author Philip K. Dick

Philip K. Dick (1928–1982) was a writer of extraordinary vision and imagination whose works reflected a strong interest in metaphysics, theology, and speculative politics. In his work, the individual is often pitted against authoritarian governments or monopolistic corporations. He also drew from his own experiences of altered states, paranoia, and mystical reveries. In 2007, Dick became the first science fiction writer to be included in the Library of America series. In addition to his dozens of published novels, he wrote over 120 short stories, many of which appeared in science fiction magazines. At least eight of his stories have been adapted for film.

About the Narrator

Luke Daniels is a narrator whose many audiobook credits range from action and suspense to young-adult fiction, including works by Philip Roth and John Updike. He has been a finalist for the prestigious Audie Award in 2012 and 2014 and has earned thirteen AudioFile Earphones Awards. As an actor, he has performed at various repertory theaters around the country, with an emphasis on Shakespeare.