Extended Audio Sample

Download Hiroshima Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Hiroshima Audiobook, by John Hersey Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (17,548 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: John Hersey Narrator: George Guidall Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: August 1985 ISBN: 9781436125765
Regular Price: $24.99 Add to Cart
— or —
FlexPass™ Price: $12.95$5.95$5.95 for new members!
Add to Cart learn more )

A journalistic masterpiece. John Hersey transports us back to the streets of Hiroshima, Japan on August 6, 1945—the day the city was destroyed by the first atomic bomb. Told through the memories of six survivors, Hiroshima is a timeless, powerful classic that will awaken your heart and your compassion. In this new edition, Hersey returns to Hiroshima to find the survivors—and to tell their fates in an eloquent and moving final chapter. Download and start listening now!

BK_RECO_004308

Quotes & Awards

  • “Nothing can be said about this book that can equal what the book has to say. It speaks for itself, and in an unforgettable way, for humanity.”

    New York Times

  • “To this day nothing tells better the horror of Hiroshima…One of the most powerful writers of modern times.”

    Washington Post

  • “Everyone able to read should read it.”

    Saturday Review of Literature

  • “Whether you believe the bomb made the difference in the war or that it should never have been dropped, Hiroshima is a must-read for all of us who live in the shadow of armed conflict.”

    Amazon.com, editorial review

  • “One of the most important books to come out of World War II…Compelling, unforgettable, and more timely than ever, this is absolutely essential.”

    Library Journal

  • “Brilliant…In its clean, classic restraint, its simplicity, its severity by implication, this is an artistic achievement as well as a threat to this still unsettled world…What they saw, what they felt what—through satiety of terror and suffering—they did not feel, what they had and what they lost, is all told here. No one can remain unconcerned or unmoved. Hersey has risen to the heights of impartial recording that makes this a human document transcending propaganda.”

    Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Amy | 2/20/2014

    " This book was definitely part of historical journalism and made famous for it, but I wasn't personally ecstatic about it. It was honest about the personal accounts of survivors of the bombing of Hiroshima, yet I found myself wandering mentally while reading it on multiple occasions. Possibly the reason for this was because I felt compelled to do so for my student (who had to read this for his history class), but I felt like the writing was somewhat dry and lacking emotion in parts, especially since this would be such an emotionally-charged subject. Writing in the journalistic style probably led to this lack of emotional involvement, as they are focused on telling the story and not necessarily how the story should make you feel. I do recommend it as an interesting historical account of the bombing incident and its aftermath, as John Hersey actually returned to Japan 40 years after the incident and tracked down his original subjects in order to track how the bomb affect the lives of these individuals. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tony | 2/20/2014

    " "Hiroshima" is such a captivating book reflecting all the horrible events during World War 2. Although I usually don't like reading history books, something about this book made me pick it up. It's disturbing events are serious that sometimes I feel as if I was living during that time period. John Hersey made this book even more universal by taking the accounts of what other people said. This book is just one of the few World War 2 books that uses the drama of the explosion taken from the people who have lived during the time period. It also explained how deadly the effect a bomb set of can cause. Bombs are deadly whether they are fission bombs or fusion bombs. Both are dangerous but fusion bombs consist of Hydrogens combined together which can be ten times more damaging then fission bombs. Nevertheless the bomb was dropped whether viewers liked it or not and that changed the world forever. This difference make some Americans feel ashamed that they did so much damage without meaning to. I liked how this book opens up peoples' eyes into seeing the different perspectives of the people involved during this time period. This book clearly demonstrates how Gandhi's saying of "Nonviolence will lead to victory". Sometimes people and groups of people just have to comprehend each others opinions, ideas and thoughts about what actions should be taken. If organizations are created this way, why do people seldom choose the path of violence? Violence will only inflict damage and hurt people. Even after people die, the next generation will come out and seek revenge creating a cycle that is endless. Nonviolence on the other hand helps create and influence peace between two groups. I recommend this book to anyone to see the power the governments and authorities have over the people and also to view the consequences of taking a wrong turn. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 K.D. Oliveros | 2/16/2014

    " Very informative! I was not yet born (of course) when the bombing in Hiroshima happened and what I read so far are cold fact history books. In this novel, John Hersey effectively used 6 characters to describe without any bias what happened in Hiroshima the day before the bombing up to a year after. I read most parts while waiting for my family roaming around Fort Santiago one Sunday afternoon and the surrounding was perfect! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Margaret | 2/11/2014

    " This is one of the best books I have ever read. It is disturbing and often gruesome, but it is a history we should know, even in the gut. If you have never read it, do! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Summer | 2/11/2014

    " Disturbing. But a book everyone should read. I hope a nuclear weapon is never used again. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Janine | 2/5/2014

    " A great way to learn about the effects of that terrible event and the time afterwards. The author managed to leave the politics behind and concentrate solely on the people who actually experienced it.Written in a matter-of-fact style without overt sentimentalities which I would suppose mirrored the actual way people dealt with it at the time since they were all deeply in shock and uncomprehending of what had happened although the writing feels a little old-fashioned now.Overall a very quick read - just a few hours - and well worth it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Hendo | 1/31/2014

    " I read this during study hall a couple years back and snatched the school's copies for my kids who HATED it. I think they simply had a hard time with the Japanese names, but I was disappointed. I've always liked this one. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gregory Herschler | 1/24/2014

    " Basically the book version of Grave of the Fireflies. Will make you hate humanity, 100% "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Amy C. | 1/21/2014

    " I started reading this book over the summer because it was one of the choice for our summer reading. At first, it interested me because I like to read about Asian stories and non-fiction. However, I abandoned the book half way and didn't finish it until now was because I think the book contains too much detail. I understand why John Hersey did that because showing all the details can emphasize the change on the people's life after the bombing incident. But I didn't like it too much because it bored me with all the details. Overall, John Hersey is still a great writer because he can illustration a character's life in words soo lively as if I was seeing the character living he/she live. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Selena | 1/13/2014

    " A quick history lesson of the bombing of Hiroshima. If you like history, this is a quick read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Gwenda | 1/11/2014

    " True story of the human aspect of the United States' dropping the atom bomb on an innocent population at the end of World War II. Gripping and tragic; it will make you think. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Justin Howe | 1/10/2014

    " This relatively short book is one of those books that bears more weight than its page count would suggest. Heart-wrenching and moving, while simultaneously matter-of-fact, Hersey's "dispassionate" prose recounting the experiences of a half dozen survivors of the bombing conveys more by how it shows than by what it says. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Loraine | 1/4/2014

    " This book vividly paints a picture of what it was like to withness an atomic bomb explosion and survive its effects, through the personal story of six survivors of the Hiroshima attack. As with many disasters -- though somehow I did not expect it from this one -- more people died and suffered from the aftermath (fires, starvation and thirst, untreated injuries, not to mention radiation sickness) than from the explosion itself. The stories of the camps that formed spontaneously, the attempts of ordinary citizens to scavenge for food and water and understand what had happened to them, and the absence of help from authorities are remarkable. I am stunned to hear how long it took for information to travel; it was days before the survivors even knew of the trajedy at Nagasaki, much less what it was exactly that they shared. This story is also enlightening for the six survivors' very different perspectives on the war, the US, and the bomb. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shoebox22 | 1/4/2014

    " Compelling. Chilling. An awesome story that had to be told. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kristen Neville | 12/30/2013

    " I thought that this was an amazing piece of journalism. The way in which John Hersey depicts the individuals effected by the atomoic bomb is simply amazing. It takes your breath away. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Annette | 12/28/2013

    " Why no country should have nuclear weapons.... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeff Bjorgan | 12/14/2013

    " The book put words to unspeakable events, and provided a glimpse into the lives impacted most by the atomic bomb. Painful to read, yet still paints a picture of the power of the human spirit. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Andrea Fortwendel | 11/25/2013

    " I wish I would have read this earlier. Six accounts of survivors of the A-bomb dropping on Hiroshima written in an engaging reporting style. Forces the reader to forget all the political reasons why the bomb was dropped and consider the humanitarian injustices of war. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Jes | 11/11/2013

    " Very serious. It was a requirement for an English class I took. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sara Belleperche | 10/1/2013

    " This story was about the first atom bomb dropped on a city. Their were some surviors that lived to tell there story of what happened in the city that day. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Rose | 5/30/2013

    " This was such a powerful book, and I was spellbound by the true life stories of the survivors. And you wonder why I attend peace rallies! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kirshaq | 5/15/2013

    " I learned a lot about the consequences of the daily lives of those that survived the bomb. A very fast read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Vladi:) | 5/2/2013

    " i learned about the many sufferings of poor innocent civilians in the aftermath of the dropping of the Hiroshima bomb "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Don | 12/22/2012

    " One of the most terrifying books you will ever read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Celeste | 11/27/2012

    " Interesting read on six people who survived the atomic bomb on Hiroshima during WWII. Written like a novel so it is wasy to follow and not just facts thrown at you. Lots of interesting facts that I had never heard before. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Caroline Alicia | 11/22/2012

    " What really got me (i read this back in undergrad over 6yrs ago) is this long descriptive part about people's eyeballs oozing out of their heads. Yet despite horrific injury the Japanese still stuck to tatemae and endured with grace and civility "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tracie | 6/9/2012

    " A look inside the lives of people affected by the bombing of Hiroshima. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Robin | 4/27/2012

    " A book club selection that was better than any history class. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ann | 2/15/2012

    " This book mak "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Allan | 1/14/2012

    " Filled with fascinating firsthand tales of people's experiences in Hiroshima when we dropped the bomb. Makes you think..... "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Carol | 1/14/2012

    " A classic. I read this many years ago and re-read it recently with the epilogue. Powerful stuff. You can see why the New Yorker dedicated an entire issue to the original work. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 dead letter office | 11/10/2011

    " i forget what this book is about. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Bill Michaud | 11/4/2011

    " This book is simply amazing...It's an easy read and one that everyone, no matter your interests, should read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nick | 9/8/2011

    " A heart-wrenching story told from multiple vantage points. The logic behind the attacks continue to befuddle me, simply because there is no rationality behind them. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kaethe | 9/4/2011

    " For some reason I didn't really connect with this, I don't know why. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Amanda | 8/27/2011

    " This book is hard and important. Survivors' accounts of the Hiroshima bombing are woven together to recreate the day of the attack and the year following it. I wish this had been included in the conversations about the Second World War when I was in school. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Vanessa Martinez | 8/24/2011

    " hiroshima is about 5 different people that survived the Hiroshima bombing.They face obstacles in their lives because of it.i thought this book was kinda boring and confusing at times because the characters story kept switching "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Chris | 5/14/2011

    " My second reading of the book. The first was back in the sixties. An amazingly straightforward account-
    ing of hell on earth delivered by the United States government. "Day of Trinity" would be a good accom-
    paniment. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Tooms1121 | 5/11/2011

    " you will view WWII differently after reading this... "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Wanda | 5/6/2011

    " It go boom! Couldn't have happened to a nicer bunch. Since I read Iris Chang first.... "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Katie | 4/27/2011

    " Devastatingly detailed. One of my favorite pieces of literary journalism. This is an important read for anyone who wants to truly understand what happened at Hiroshima. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Joshua | 4/18/2011

    " The two books that bookend my conception of what it means to be a journalist. Though these books would seem to be complete opposites, both convey this message very clearly: practice empathy. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Shoebox22 | 4/17/2011

    " Compelling. Chilling. An awesome story that had to be told. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kevin | 4/13/2011

    " a very moving book, that everyone should read, about the beginning of the Atomic age and the death and then rebirth of a city "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kristina | 4/13/2011

    " A non-biased look at six survivors of the atomic weapon dropped on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. The book tells the story of these six survivors from the moments before the bomb, to the lives they had many years later. "

Write a Review
What is FlexPass?
  • Your first audiobook is just $5.95
  • Over 90% are at or below $12.95
  • "LOVE IT" guarantee
  • No time limits or expirations
About the Author
Author John Hersey

John Hersey (1914–1993), a prolific and acclaimed writer of both fiction and nonfiction, won a Pulitzer Prize for A Bell for Adano. Yet throughout his life, he was most respected for Hiroshima. According to the New Yorker, “[It] remains his crowning achievement. Though it is imbued with a profound moral sense, it does not preach. It does not hector. It simply tells. The power of it, and of its author, is in the reporting.”

About the Narrator

George Guidall, winner of eighty-eight AudioFile Earphones Awards, has twice won the prestigious Audie Award for Excellence in Audiobook Narration. In 2014 the Audio Publishers Association presented him with the Special Achievement Award for an audiobook narrator of exceptional stature and accomplishment. During his thirty-year recording career he has recorded over 1,100 audiobooks, won multiple awards, been a mentor to many narrators, and shown by example the potential of fine storytelling. Among Guidall’s narration achievements are Crime and Punishment, The Iliad, and John Irving’s A Widow for One Year, which earned him an Audie Award for best unabridged narration of a novel, an honor he captured again for his rendition of Wally Lamb’s I Know This Much Is True. Guidall’s forty-year acting career includes starring roles on Broadway, an Obie Award for best performance off Broadway, and frequent television appearances.