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Download Guest of Honor: Booker T. Washington, Theodore Roosevelt, and the White House Dinner That Shocked a Nation Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Guest of Honor: Booker T. Washington, Theodore Roosevelt, and the White House Dinner That Shocked a Nation Audiobook, by Deborah Davis Click for printable size audiobook cover
4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 4.00 (113 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Deborah Davis Narrator: Karen White Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: June 2012 ISBN: 9781452678573
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In 1901, President Theodore Roosevelt invited Booker T. Washington to have dinner at the executive mansion with the First Family. The next morning, news that the president had dined with a black man—and former slave—sent shock waves through the nation. Although African Americans had helped build the White House and had worked for most of the presidents, not a single one had ever been invited to dine there. Fueled by inflammatory newspaper articles, political cartoons, and even vulgar songs, the scandal escalated and threatened to topple two of America's greatest men.In this smart, accessible narrative, one seemingly ordinary dinner becomes a window onto post-Civil War American history and politics, and onto the lives of two dynamic men whose experiences and philosophies connect in unexpected ways. Deborah Davis also introduces dozens of other fascinating figures who have previously occupied the margins and footnotes of history, creating a lively and vastly entertaining book that reconfirms her place as one of our most talented popular historians. Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • A well-researched, highly [listenable] treatment of an important era in racial relations, encapsulated in the meeting of two of the era's most significant men. Kirkus Starred Review
  • “Provide[s] a panoramic view of America at the turn of the twentieth century…Davis’ book is a marker of how far the country has come.”

    Washington Post

  • “A well-researched, highly readable treatment of an important era in racial relations, encapsulated in the meeting of two of the era’s most significant men.”

    Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

  • “In fluid prose and with clear respect for her subject matter, Davis paints a vivid picture of race relations at the turn of the twentieth century—a story resonating with today’s fraught political and racial landscape.”

    Publishers Weekly

Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Marilyn | 2/18/2014

    " A fairly dry accounting of an important slice of history, but filled with fascinating facts and little known incidents. I liked Davis's compare and contrast method with her two characters who, interestingly, had much in common. That, in itself, was a testimony to the bond between people that has no racial overtones. Washington and Roosevelt were vastly different people who had similar personal experiences that forged their lives. There were some interesting political machinations which resounded loud and clear in this particular year's presidential race -- I guess history keeps repeating itself. I was not crazy about the writing style -- but it did not keep me from enjoying this fascinating book. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tim | 1/23/2014

    " Interesting review of the diner encounter between Theodore Roosevelt and Booker T. Washington - the first African American invited to dinner at the White House. TR and Booker T. are characters that become more fascinating with time, and how TR solicited Washington's views was groundbreaking. I think it says a lot about both men that they did not think the dinner invitation was such a big deal. Of course, once it became public it was debated and critiqued for years. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Cathy Doyle | 1/5/2014

    " A very clear easy to read comparison of the lives of Booker T. Washington and Theodore Roosevelt, leading up to the event in question, when Roosevelt invited Washington to dinner, making him the first African American to dine in the White House. Davis writes in an interesting manner, the book was a quick read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jonathan | 12/30/2013

    " Not bad, but if you are only interested in the meal, you could save yourself a lot of time by reading the chapter in Edmund Morris'Theodore Rex on the event. A vast majority of Guest of Honor is a joint biography of Roosevelt and Washington, that any minimally well-read student of the era will find too elementary to be informative. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kela | 12/18/2013

    " This was a very interesting book. I admit when I brought it home from the library, I wasn't sure if I'd actually read the whole thing. I wondered how Davis would turn one dinner into an entire book and keep it interesting. She managed to do just that tho. The book is really a mini biography of both Washington and Roosevelt. This book is proof that we have made progress in race relations. I found the public outcry of one informal dinner amazing. The remarks/behavior by supposed leaders of the time are enough to make your stomach turn. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kathie | 12/6/2013

    " Interesting biographical information about Booker T. and T.R. and where the country was in race relations at the turn of the century. Booker T. was born a slave and become one of the nation's leading African American leaders. T.R. was born into wealth and was very outspoken. The Republican party thought they were getting him out of the way by making him Vice President. Then McKinley was assassinated. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Gail | 11/18/2013

    " A fascinating expose of Theodore Roosevelt and Booker T. Washington. I thought the book was well written and just a marvelous read. There's fascinating bits of trivia scattered throughout which shapes the text even more so. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Pat Mitchell | 10/13/2013

    " Interesting historical account of relationship between Teddy Roosevelt and Booker T Washington and their impact on politics. Provided much better understanding of both men's lives and their impact on the United States. Very good read! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Edward Sullivan | 7/4/2013

    " A vivid, completely engaging portrait of these two giants of American history and their times. Davis does an excellent job of explaining how and why the single dinner between the two opened up "a Pandora's box of racism." "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Longbeverly | 5/15/2013

    " Fascinating! This is the way to make history interesting! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Frances | 4/28/2013

    " Fascinating and thorough... kept me very engaged and brought that time period to live. A small slice of history that had so much to tell. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Pgirty | 2/6/2013

    " Booker T Washington is one of the unsung heroes in American History. He once dined at the White House with Theodore Roosevelt and a firestorm of racism erupted in the South. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Susan | 2/1/2013

    " Well written and easy to read. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nancy Slocum | 1/9/2013

    " Wonderful book! A fascinating look at many social issues that still face us today. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Mark | 12/24/2012

    " A little known event involving two immensely well known men serves as the basis for this lively, well-written, and highly entertaining book about America at the dawn of the 20th century. Enthralling, eye-opening, and full of things you didn't know and should! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dotty | 8/15/2012

    " Learned a lot about two historical figures I hadn't read about before. Author did a great job of intertwining there lives. "

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About the Author
Deborah Davis is the author of eight books, including Strapless, Party of the Century, and Guest of Honor, which won the prestigious Phillis Wheatley Award for best work of history in 2013.
About the Narrator

Karen White is a classically trained actress who has been recording audiobooks since 1999. An Audie Award finalist, she has earned eight AudioFile Earphones Awards. Her reading of The Hemingses of Monticello by Annette Gordon-Reed was named one of AudioFile’s Best Audiobooks of 2009.