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Download Freedomnomics: Why the Free Market Works and Other Half-Baked Theories Don't Audiobook

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3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (290 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: John R. Lott Narrator: Brian Emerson Publisher: Blackstone Audio Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: November 2007 ISBN: 9781455187294
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Freedomnomics is everything you wanted to know about the world but didn’t know economics could tell you.

As the blockbuster bestseller Freakonomics demonstrated, economics can explain everything, from why people behave the way they do to how governments and businesses organize themselves. But are the basic assumptions and conclusions in Freakonomics true? Does the free market usually lead to unintended and negative consequences? Quite the opposite, says John Lott, who holds a PhD in economics.

In fact, says Lott, a wide range of fascinating and peculiar case studies prove the simple adage that if something is more costly, people will do less of it. And, in a refutation of Freakonomics’ most controversial idea, Lott shows why legalized abortion leads to family breakdown, which leads to more crime.

Extending its rigorous economic analysis even further to our political and criminal justice systems, Freedomnomics reveals:

–How the free market creates incentives for people to behave honestly

–How political campaign restrictions keep incumbents in power

–Why affirmative action in police departments leads to higher crime rates

–How women’s suffrage led to a massive increase in the size of government

–Why women become more conservative when they get married and more liberal when they get divorced

–How secret ballots reduce voter participation

–Why state-owned companies and government agencies are much more likely to engage in unfair predation than are private firms

Entertaining, persuasive, and based on dozens of economic studies spanning decades, Freedomnomics not only shows how free markets really work but proves that, when it comes to promoting prosperity and economic justice, nothing works better.

Download and start listening now!

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Quotes & Awards

  • “Lott demonstrates how free market principles produce the greatest success…This book is essential to those who seek to understand liberty.”

    Edwin Meese III, former US attorney general under President Reagan

  • “Truly, this is a perspective that is enlightening and worthy of presentation…John Lott has meaningfully contributed to the necessary vigilance toward the preservation of freedom with the tales of his professional journey.”

    John Raisian, Director and Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University

  • “Brian Emerson delivers this work as an enthusiastic and inspired economics professor might. It is lively and paced at a smooth tempo. Emerson transports listeners to the classroom and provides meaty ideas to ponder. His voice gives the work both the authority and vision the author intended…Freedomnomics is an easy listen as well as an interesting ideology.”

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Listener Opinions

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Greg Powers | 2/19/2014

    " This is a response to Freakanomics and explains a lot of the weird things that people normally think are either economic anomalies or are just people being greedy. A large portion of it is devoted to pricing. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Tom | 2/14/2014

    " A sobering answer book to the breathless Freakonomics. Read both and triangulate the truth from there. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Void lon iXaarii | 2/4/2014

    " A quite cool book! I was wondering if it's related to my beloved Freakonomics books... and indeed it is, in a roundabout way: it seems to be even correcting them... very cool! The book may not be as entertaining as those but the data analysis seems sound and the solid thinking reminds me of my absolute favorite in the field: Thomas Sowell. I'm off to search for other books by the author! "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kevin | 1/23/2014

    " Counter to some of the arguments in Freakonomics. Based on how the free market works. Very biased book. Lacks good references to back up statements and many points made are not backed up at all yet very conclusive-sounding. There was even some small contradictions. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Angie | 1/17/2014

    " Scary! It's actually making me question or at least rethink my liberal views. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jennifer | 1/3/2014

    " Not just a rebuttal to Freakonomics, though he does address some of its "fuzzy math," this book defends Free Markets, and gives examples of how different kinds of incentives motivate people for better or worse. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Northman 737 | 12/29/2013

    " This was a really interesting book obviously centered around economics but with real world examples and statistics. Everybody should be required to read this in high school or at least in college. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Allison | 12/17/2013

    " Utterly forgettable. I cannot stand authors with such a blatant agenda. At least let me figure out the agenda for myself! He lost me when he tried to assert that children are safer in homes with guns. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sherri | 11/14/2013

    " My husband who is an economist thought this book had great economic explanations. I found it a bit dry and not as interesting to read as Freakonomics. I recommend that you read this only if you are required to read it for a class. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 James | 10/30/2013

    " Great book. Read my review of Freedomnomics by clicking here. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Joel Massey | 8/15/2013

    " Conservative when it comes to money, I suggest this book for those wanting a counter argument to socialism. Some of the claims seem naive but still an ok read. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Melissa Henderson | 7/14/2013

    " Very informative and fact-filled, but I still found "After America" a lot more engaging. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Aaron | 5/18/2013

    " A response to Freakonomics. Some good insight. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Atchisson | 2/2/2013

    " While "Freakonomics" gets all the press, this book by John Lott spells out what REALLY goes on. If you want a fun take on he skewed perspective of "Freakonomics", this book offers it. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 BLACK CAT | 12/6/2012

    " Various freakonomics examples and other possible explanations to the ones proposed by freakonomics authors. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kenny | 7/8/2012

    " Meh. Very one-sided. If you want a more balanced "economic libertarian" point of view, I suggest listening to Russ Roberts podcasts at econ talk. He is always willing to listen to opposing arguments. Lott seems very closed-minded. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Troy | 2/17/2012

    " Great book, good for all you Marxists out there to learn a thing or two "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kristi Willard | 10/9/2011

    " A conservative twist on Freakonomics, and makes more sense. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 James Bencivenga | 7/8/2011

    " An interesting read. Not a true retort to freakonomics. I enjoyed reading both books. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Brandon | 7/7/2011

    " While I didn't agree with everything Lott argued for (and against), I did appreciate his perspectives on issues. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 C.W. | 3/19/2011

    " Lott takes complex subjects and breaks them down so they are trivial to understand.

    A good light read. Very informative.

    Lott is not afraid to discuss politically incorrect topics, and prove his point devastatingly. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Slobodan | 8/14/2010

    " Great overview of the market successes. The market failures exists but the government intervention makes things worse. I disagree about the chapter regarding smoking everything else is well written. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Aaron | 3/27/2010

    " A response to Freakonomics. Some good insight. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Allison | 11/8/2009

    " Utterly forgettable. I cannot stand authors with such a blatant agenda. At least let me figure out the agenda for myself! He lost me when he tried to assert that children are safer in homes with guns. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Greg | 10/19/2009

    " This is a response to Freakanomics and explains a lot of the weird things that people normally think are either economic anomalies or are just people being greedy. A large portion of it is devoted to pricing. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Sherri | 9/22/2009

    " My husband who is an economist thought this book had great economic explanations. I found it a bit dry and not as interesting to read as Freakonomics. I recommend that you read this only if you are required to read it for a class. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Kristi | 9/11/2009

    " A conservative twist on Freakonomics, and makes more sense. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kenny | 7/14/2009

    " Meh. Very one-sided. If you want a more balanced "economic libertarian" point of view, I suggest listening to Russ Roberts podcasts at econ talk. He is always willing to listen to opposing arguments. Lott seems very closed-minded. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rnlockett | 6/26/2009

    " John Lott is a brilliant guy. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 James | 5/11/2009

    " An interesting read. Not a true retort to freakonomics. I enjoyed reading both books. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 mostunexpected | 3/20/2009

    " This book was written as a defense of capitalism and a counter argument to freakomnomics.

    I loved booth books, probably because I love a good debate. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Kevin | 3/19/2009

    " Counter to some of the arguments in Freakonomics. Based on how the free market works. Very biased book. Lacks good references to back up statements and many points made are not backed up at all yet very conclusive-sounding. There was even some small contradictions. "

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About the Author

John R. Lott Jr. received his PhD in economics from UCLA in 1984. He has held positions at the University of Chicago, Yale University, Stanford, UCLA, Wharton, and Rice. He is the author of The Bias against Guns and the bestselling More Guns, Less Crime and has published numerous articles in academic journals.

About the Narrator

Brian Emerson is an actor and technical director with a long career in the Washington, DC, and Baltimore areas.