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Download Free Lunch: How the Wealthiest Americans Enrich Themselves at Government Expense (and Stick You with the Bill) Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Free Lunch: How the Wealthiest Americans Enrich Themselves at Government Expense (and Stick You with the Bill) Audiobook, by David Cay Johnston Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (546 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: David Cay Johnston Narrator: David Cay Johnston Publisher: Penguin Random House Format: Abridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 2007 ISBN: 9781429592284
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Free Lunch answers the great mystery of our time: How did our strong and growing economy give way to job uncertainty, debt, bankruptcy, and fear for millions of Americans? Acclaimed reporter David Cay Johnston reveals how government policies and spending have reached deep into the wallets of the many to benefit the top 1 percent of the wealthiest.

He shows exactly who has been getting free lunches from the government—from $100 million to Warren Buffett, to $1.3 billion to the owners of the Yankees and Mets. But of course there’s really no such thing as a free lunch. The taxpayer always picks up the bill. With his in depth reporting, vivid stories, and sharp analysis, Johnston reveals the forces that shape our everyday economic lives—and shows us how we can finally make things better.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Mollie | 2/13/2014

    " My husband brought this book home from the library. The title caught my eye and I picked it up and couldn't put it down. Johnston discusses the ever growing problem of corporate welfare in our country and how our economic story is under-reported. When you see the stats whether you're conservative or liberal it will make your blood boil. The only problem is that I don't feel completely satisfied after reading "Free Lunch". I feel like the ball is rolling and it's up to us to stop it. But how??? "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Alain | 2/1/2014

    " This book did a lot to shape my view of politics in this country. I can't drive past a Super Walmart or a BassPro or some other devlopment, or go to a game at the local sports arena without thinking about the things I learned from this book. If you want to understand why people are upset about the direction events seem to be taking in this country, you should read this book. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Sherman | 1/29/2014

    " A very depressing book about the middle class of today(?.....the rich and the poor, the have's and the have not's. About the rich oil companies like Halliburton and the influence of lobbyists with our government.Bottom Line: There is NO Free Lunch! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Vilo | 1/22/2014

    " This was a pretty sobering look at a serious topic. I kept trying to remember that this is just one side of the issue. Unfortunately what I read in the newspaper correlated pretty strongly with the assertions that certain companies demand concessions from cities, thus not paying taxes for local services, schools, etc. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Anne | 1/17/2014

    " As somebody who falls into one of the most taxed income brackets, I have to say my blood is still boiling after reading this book. It was well-written in that it was a quick, interesting read that didn't get too bogged down in the nitty-gritty. But I wish the author had given us more in the way of possible solutions. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bill | 1/17/2014

    " Any individual chapter in this book is sufficient to piss me off, taken as a whole, I was to look up instructions on guillotine construction. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nosocialize | 1/17/2014

    " This book was hugely informative about government hand outs to big corporations. After hearing the author speak about a few chapters on NPR i was sold, and I have to say I enjoyed reading it more than I thought i would. That said my enjoyment came more out of a, dear lord I'm glad I know now those fucking wanker politicians should die, but it was still interesting. If gov stuff bores you it may still tickle your fancy since you learn about the history of things like health care in America and how baseball stadiums are being bought with your money. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Eugene | 12/31/2013

    " An excellent explanation of why we're not in the middle of a socialist state but, rather, in the middle of a corporate welfare state. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Kenny | 12/4/2013

    " Everyone should read this book! Whether you are Republican or Democrat it is important to see how both parties have contributed to a system where the uber-rich use the government to get themselves more of our money. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Patrick Farr | 9/1/2013

    " Great explanation of social welfare for the upper class. This is what is wrong with our current system of government... "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Shanelle | 7/10/2013

    " This book had a hard time keeping my attention... or maybe I had a hard time paying attention. It is a fascinating book, but boring, boring, boring. (that's why I gave it only 2 stars) "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Remontoire Joris | 4/1/2013

    " It is not justice, it is just-us. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julie | 2/8/2013

    " Convoluted games people play to bilk taxpayers of billions. How exactly DID George W. Bush get rich? "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Scott Jensen | 1/20/2013

    " Wow! This guy's a bit confused. He jumps from the far right to the far left and then back again as he complains about government subsidies giving a free ride to the richest Americans. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Nick | 7/14/2012

    " Still reading this sequel to Perfectly Legal, and it is perhaps more disturbing than that book. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Randi | 6/14/2012

    " The information is convoluted and hard to follow - not as in difficult to understand, but difficult to get excited about. It seems like a fascinating topic, but the writing gets in the way. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jc | 8/26/2011

    " Maddening. Interesting. Makes you want to do something immediately to stop it. Writing not bad, can get repetitive. Information is mind-boggling. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Paul | 5/26/2011

    " How can Americans be encouraged to be moral and financially responsible and encourage/check others simultaneously? It's hard to think the teachings of the bible will be enough to create real respectful reform in the financial world. Book will make you angry but excellent info. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Julie | 5/11/2011

    " Convoluted games people play to bilk taxpayers of billions. How exactly DID George W. Bush get rich? "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Bill | 4/7/2011

    " Any individual chapter in this book is sufficient to piss me off, taken as a whole, I was to look up instructions on guillotine construction. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Robert | 3/8/2011

    " I would highly recommend this book to anyone. It was very enlightening and also extremely enraging. Rich people are dragging us all down. Vive la revolution! "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Cliff | 1/3/2011

    " The author makes plenty of great factual points, but he also incorrectly extrapolates many of those facts to suit his own idealogical arguments and arrive at his own preconceived conclusions.

    Great facts, though! Read it for the factual insight, but be wary of the author's logic. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Sherman | 9/21/2010

    " A very depressing book about the middle class of today(?.....the rich and the poor, the have's and the have not's. About the rich oil companies like Halliburton and the influence of lobbyists with our government.Bottom Line: There is NO Free Lunch! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Toni | 6/16/2010

    " Excellent book. A must read for anyone interested in how big corporations take advantage of "taxpayer" money. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jc | 1/5/2010

    " Maddening. Interesting. Makes you want to do something immediately to stop it. Writing not bad, can get repetitive. Information is mind-boggling. "

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About the Author

David Cay Johnston, a Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter, has been called the “de facto chief tax enforcer of the United States.” He is the author of the New York Times bestsellers Perfectly Legal and Free Lunch. Johnston was a reporter for the New York Times for thirteen years and now teaches at Syracuse University College of Law.