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Download Celebrated Cases of Judge Dee (Dee Goong An): An Authentic Eighteenth-Century Chinese Detective Novel Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Celebrated Cases of Judge Dee (Dee Goong An): An Authentic Eighteenth-Century Chinese Detective Novel Audiobook, by Yuri Rasovsky Click for printable size audiobook cover
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (568 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Yuri Rasovsky Narrator: Mark Bramhall, Lorna Raver, Stefan Rudnicki Publisher: Craig Black Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: May 2009 ISBN: 9781455194575
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Long before Western writers had even conceived the idea of writing detective stories, the Chinese had developed a long tradition of literary works that chronicled the cases of important district magistrates. One of the most celebrated of these was Judge Dee, who lived in the seventh century AD.

This book, written anonymously in the eighteenth century, interweaves three of Judge Dee’s most baffling cases: a double murder among traveling merchants, the fatal poisoning of a bride on her wedding night, and the suspicious death of a shop keeper with a beautiful wife. The crimes take him up and down the great silk routes, into ancient graveyards where he consults the spirits of the dead, and through all levels of society, leading him to some brilliant detective work.

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Quotes & Awards

  • Dee Goong An is artfully narrated by Mark Bramhall…He pronounces the Chinese names with assurance. His full-voiced reading is especially good with querulous old men and the stern Judge Dee. Highly recommended.”

    SoundCommentary.com

  • “Offers a glimpse of ancient Chinese society, illustrating the importance of rank and authority. Mark Bramhall reads with an appropriately formal air but relaxes when he portrays roadside ruffians and guilty widows.”

    AudioFile

Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 2/7/2014

    " Thank you Ken Fagan! I loved this book. The authenticity (it being a direct translation) was fascinating. And the authors prologue, discussing the format of the Chinese Murder Mystery and the role that the judge played in the cases was equally fascinating as well as refreshing. I would read this one again. Can't wait to pick up the original Judge Dee works from Van Gulik. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Charlene | 12/12/2013

    " This is a translation from Chinese of a detective story. The time frame is the seventh century A.D. while the stories were written in the 18th century by some one well versed in Chinese legal code. It is well worth the time to read and refer to the translator's postscript. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Randy Hollenbach | 11/22/2013

    " A solid Confucian work. The Daoist and Confucian methods of investigation implemented by Judge Dee are impressive. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ben | 11/4/2013

    " An Authentic Eighteenth-Century Detective novel from China!! Does a pretty awesome job describing the justice system in traditional China. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Thomas S | 10/7/2013

    " Not bad, maybe 3 1/2 stars. A collection of short stories from the Judge Dee series. Dee is actually based on a real character from the Tang Dynasty (7th and 8th centuries, I think)--kind of an Imperial Chinese Sherlock Holmes. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bethany | 4/29/2013

    " One of my most enjoyable required readings. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Kathryn | 1/13/2013

    " I liked this book. It is interesting, and you won't want to put it down until you find out who the criminal was. The author is creative, and it is a good insight into Chinese culture concerning criminals and the judicial system. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Amy | 12/27/2012

    " Not my favorite of the Judge Dee books, but still good. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Jose Moreno Cortes | 11/23/2012

    " ok is not that exciting like other mystery but have several twist, the only thing that I didn't like are the titles at the beginning of the chapter, because they are kind of spoilers, (skip them!) but interesting to read different things from long time ago. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Danica | 7/2/2012

    " didn't expect it, but this is basically unmitigated AWESOME. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Dave | 3/18/2012

    " Thrilling. Amazing as to what a Chinese judge of that era was permitted in the name of justice and the terrible consequences to him if he was wrong. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Penny | 10/26/2011

    " 18th century Chinese detective novel with lots of translator supplemental information. The main character Judge Dee uses questionable means to obtain evidence, as he says "...I employed threats, torture, and persuasion..." which is predominate throughout the story. Overall an interesting read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rohan | 10/13/2011

    " Really, really good detective novel. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Adam Lewis Schroeder | 5/18/2011

    " Supremely satisfying. Martial arts. Horrific tortures as a legal means of gathering evidence. Impersonating underworld deities. The interweaving cases are great, though we don't learn much about Judge Dee himself except that he has both ninjas and doddering old men in his employ. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Don | 3/16/2011

    " This book is interesting from a historical view point but the writing is awkward and doesn't flow, maybe because it's a translation. Also, the plots were pretty obvious. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rohan | 9/15/2010

    " Really, really good detective novel. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Danica | 2/21/2010

    " didn't expect it, but this is basically unmitigated AWESOME. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Bethany | 2/24/2009

    " One of my most enjoyable required readings. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Ben | 11/22/2008

    " An Authentic Eighteenth-Century Detective novel from China!! Does a pretty awesome job describing the justice system in traditional China. "

  • 1 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 51 out of 5 Lisa | 7/23/2008

    " I wish I liked this book but it was pretty bad. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Michael | 5/23/2008

    " weird ancient chinese detective drama.

    I read this for world history II. "

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About the Author
Author Yuri Rasovsky

Yuri Rasovsky (1944–2012) won wide critical acclaim during his forty-year career as an audio dramatist, writer, producer, and director. His numerous honors included two Peabody Awards, nine Audie Awards, and a Grammy. In 2011, his production for Blackstone, The Mark of Zorro, was nominated for a Grammy. His final production for Blackstone before his death was Die, Snow White! Die, Damn You! He has left behind an incredible legacy.

About the Narrators

Mark Bramhall has won thirty-four AudioFile Earphones Awards and has twice been a finalist for the Audiobook Publishers Association’s prestigious Audie Award for best narration. He has been named by Publishers Weekly and AudioFile magazine among their “Best Voices of the Year” in 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013. He is also an award-winning actor whose acting credits include off-Broadway, regional, and many Los Angeles venues as well as television, animation, and feature films. He has taught and directed at the American Academy of Dramatic Art.

Lorna Raver, named one of AudioFile magazine’s Best Voices of the Year, has received numerous Audie Award nominations and fifrteen AudioFile Earphones Awards. An experienced stage actress, she has also guest-starred on many top television series and starred in director Sam Raimi’s film Drag Me to Hell. Her numerous audiobook credits include The Age of Innocence, Up from Orchard Street, The Lodger, Selected Readings from the Portable Dorothy Parker, and Diamond Ruby.

Stefan Rudnicki first became involved with audiobooks in 1994. Now a Grammy-winning audiobook producer, he has worked on more than three thousand audiobooks as a narrator, writer, producer, or director. He has narrated more than three hundred audiobooks. A recipient of multiple AudioFile Earphones Awards, he was presented the coveted Audie Award for solo narration in 2005, 2007, and 2014, and was named one of AudioFile’s Golden Voices in 2012.