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Download Art & Fear: Observations On the Perils (and Rewards) of Artmaking Audiobook

Extended Audio Sample Art & Fear: Observations On the Perils (and Rewards) of Artmaking, by David Bayles, Arthur Morey, Ted Orland Click for printable size audiobook cover
3.00036549707602 out of 53.00036549707602 out of 53.00036549707602 out of 53.00036549707602 out of 53.00036549707602 out of 5 3.00 (10,944 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: David Bayles, Arthur Morey, Ted Orland Narrator: Arthur Morey Publisher: Tantor Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date:
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Art & Fear: Observations on the Perils (and Rewards) of Artmaking is one of those books that exemplifies the saying, "brevity is the soul of wit." In print, the book is a scant 130 pages while, as an audiobook, it can be devoured in three hours. However, the prose is beautifully composed, almost poetic in its sense of flow. It's obvious that many hours were spent revising this book until it reached this polished final phase. So the artistry that went into the book contrasts with its ultimate message which is very pragmatic.

Bayles and Orland, the two authors, go into the issues that artists face when producing artwork, the major one being fear. Artists are afraid of many things—of being misunderstood, of producing bad work, of not being worth much as human beings or as artists. Often, the fear gets to be too much, and the artist stops making art altogether.

However, Bayles and Orland believe that it's the process of making art which holds all the answers. If you're dedicated and you pursue the art with all that you have, it will give you the answers you're looking for. You'll discover who you are as a person and as an artist by actually doing the work. They insist that the majority of work that most artists do is actually not that good. Only a small portion of it is good, and by working more, you learn to do more of that kind of work.

Overall, this is a gem that belongs on the bookshelf of every artist, whether s/he is already established or just beginning his/her career. It's an inspiration for when you're feeling blocked and provides some time-tested techniques to get past that feeling. It is full of encouragement as well as good advice.

David Bayles grew up in Colorado and Texas, going to school at the University of Colorado where he studied Sociology and Philosophy. He also went to graduate school for Sociology but realized that he wanted to be an artist and took up photography. He was greatly influenced by Ansel Adams, using his books to teach himself to shoot and spent the 80s doing commercial photography. He is currently a conservationist working for the Pacific Rivers Council.

Ted Orland went to USC where he studied Industrial Design. Like Bayles, he was greatly influenced by Ansel Adams; he took a workshop with Adams and ended up working as his workshop assistant. He also got a Master's in Interdisciplinary Creative Arts from San Francisco State University and started teaching. He has taught at Stanford, the University of Oregon and a number of workshop centers.

Art & Fear explores the way art gets made, the reasons it often doesn’t get made, and the nature of the difficulties that cause so many artists to give up along the way. The book’s coauthors, David Bayles and Ted Orland, are themselves both working artists, grappling daily with the problems of making art in the real world. Their insights and observations, drawn from personal experience, provide an incisive view into the world of art as it is experienced by artmakers themselves.

This is not your typical self-help audiobook. This is a title written by artists, for artists—it’s about what it feels like when artists sit down at their easel or keyboard, in their studio or performance space, trying to do the work they need to do. First published in 1994, Art & Fear quickly became an underground classic. Word-of-mouth response alone—now enhanced by internet posting—has placed it among the bestselling books on artmaking and creativity nationally.

Art & Fear has attracted a remarkably diverse audience, ranging from beginning to accomplished artists in every medium, including an exceptional concentration among students and teachers.

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Listener Opinions

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 by Old Man Parker | 10/17/2016

    " AMAZING BOOK! I'm a working "Low-Brow" Fine-Artist. I hit a wall in mid-career. This book talked to me - told exactly what I was going through. It saved my career, and maybe my life. Thank you David & Ted! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 by Old Man Parker | 10/17/2016

    " AMAZING BOOK! I'm a working "Low-Brow" Fine-Artist. I hit a wall in mid-career. This book talked to me - told exactly what I was going through. It saved my career, and maybe my life. Thank you David & Ted! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 by Kate | 2/20/2014

    " I will always be reading this book. This has helped me through some dark dark times as an artist. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 by Kristi Willard | 2/17/2014

    " The best book on the development of art from an emotional perspective. Why are we afraid we are not good enough to produce art? Amazing questions and answers. "

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About the Author

David Bayles is an accomplished photographer, author, workshop leader, and conservationist. He has studied with Ansel Adams and Brett Weston, among others, and has taught and written extensively in the arts for over thirty years. Bayles is coauthor, with Ted Orland, of Art & Fear, the perennial bestseller on issues of artistic development, and Notes on a Shared Landscape: Making Sense of the American West. He lives in the woods just outside Eugene, Oregon, and spends part of his time on the Monterey Peninsula.