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Download Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins of the Internet Audiobook (Unabridged)

Extended Audio Sample Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins of the Internet (Unabridged) Audiobook, by Katie Hafner
3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 3.00 (604 ratings) (rate this audio book) Author: Katie Hafner Narrator: Mark Douglas Nelson Publisher: Katie Hafner Format: Unabridged Audiobook Delivery: Instant Download Audio Length: Release Date: December 2012 ISBN:
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Twenty-five years ago, it didn't exist. Today, 20 million people worldwide are surfing the Net. Where Wizards Stay Up Late is the exciting story of the pioneers responsible for creating the most talked about, most influential, and most far-reaching communications breakthrough since the invention of the telephone.

In the 1960s, when computers where regarded as mere giant calculators, J.C.R. Licklider at MIT saw them as the ultimate communications devices. With Defense Department funds, he and a band of visionary computer whizzes began work on a nationwide, interlocking network of computers. Taking listeners behind the scenes, Where Wizards Stay Up Late captures the hard work, genius, and happy accidents of their daring, stunningly successful venture.

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Listener Opinions

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 David Hurst | 2/18/2014

    " Excellent account of technologies that underpin the internet. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Brian | 2/17/2014

    " this was a good book. i liked reading about the processes to start networking and such. it was a bit too technical for me to grasp everything, and i kind of wished that it would have gone into more recent history as well, but so many more people got involved as it snowballed i am sure that a comprehensive history would look like the OED! "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tommy /|\ | 2/14/2014

    " The story of the various interlocking aspects of the internet isn't readily understood by the average user of its technologies. In fact, it would probably be safe to assume that most users believe that the origins of the internet came about in the late 1990s. Even with the often misrepresented quote from then-Presidential candidate Al Gore, the underlying technologies that comprise the internet remain a solid mystery to the typical internet denizen. "Where Wizards Stay Up Late" provides a wide-arching overview of where the technologies of packet-switching and TCP/IP came from, as well as that of the collaborative mainstay of business today - Electronic Mail. Furthermore, the book chronicles how the Internet of today evolved from a collaborative research tool (ARPANET) under the control of a small office in the Pentagon (ARPA, and then DARPA) into the commercial entity it has become today. Stripped of a lot of the technical concepts, Hafner and Lyon bring the compelling story of the pioneers of this wonderful collaborative communications tool that has come to be so fully integrated into our daily lives today. The last two chapters -- "Email" and "A Rocket on Our Hands" -- as well as the final Epilogue make the effort of reading the entire storyline worthwhile. I gladly set this book next to "Fire in the Valley" and "What the Dormouse Said" as excellent historical treatises on the developments during the pioneering phases of today's technological revolution. Very well worth the read. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Harry Hackney | 2/8/2014

    " I really enjoyed this historical tale of the invention of the Internet. Some myths get busted along the way. For one thing, the Internet has nothing to do with what you've been told was the reason for its invention. The decisions made many years ago with much simpler computers and on a trusted network still affect the Internet today. If you enjoy stories about the Internet and computing, you'll certainly enjoy this book. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Mike | 2/5/2014

    " A nice (if sometimes a little boring) run-through of the history and personalities that brought packet-switching and the Internet into being. So many inventions are created when people ignored those who said something couldn't be done and just decided to try it out. Perhaps that explains why so many graduate students (who have not yet grown a protective layer of cynicism) are able to create new things (and they certainly created them during this period!). Make no mistake, this is NOT "Hackers" or "Soul of New Machine", which are top-notched Pulitzer books. And since this is written only for the layman it is accessible, but I would like to read something more substantial. However it is thoroughly researched and this will certainly do if you're interested in this period of history. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 John | 1/28/2014

    " Technical, but an excellent overview of the very early origins of the Internet from late 50s to early 70s. it's based on a lot of interviews, so everyone is portrayed as a genius. but hell, if you develop the greatest invention in human history, maybe that treatment is deserved "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 John Hoag | 1/6/2014

    " The definitive Internet history, recommended to my by the last subject interviewed - Mark Pullen, then at NSF, now at Mason. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jeff Shattuck | 1/5/2014

    " If you want to know how the Internet came to be, read this. You will be dropped off way in the past before computers and taken all the way to near-present-day, and when you're done you will have a deep respect for the people who made the Internet possible and just how damn hard it was. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Tiff | 12/29/2013

    " Fascinating narrative--a little too detailed at times but hey, what an amazing set of brains working together on such massive concepts such as FTP, IP, hosts, etc. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Lance Wiggs | 11/16/2013

    " My goodness this was good. An excellent description of the characters and events involved in the early days of the internet. Read it. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 I | 10/30/2013

    " Short, relatively complete history of the development of ARPAnet. A bit too sober: short on much interesting anecdote or anything else that makes the engineering problems compelling for a lay reader. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Jeana | 10/16/2013

    " Interesting history of the events and people behind the Internet. Worth the read if you're interested in the topic. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Rianna | 10/7/2013

    " liked it a lot . . . more please! Need a new edition! "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Audrey | 8/7/2013

    " yeah, I read geeky techie stuff. It's good! and helps at THE J.O.B. "

  • 3 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 53 out of 5 Ian | 7/31/2013

    " As far as I know, a thorough but fairly dry history of the origins of the ARPANET. Later developments like Ethernet and TCP/IP are sort of tacked on at the end. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Jacob | 7/7/2013

    " Great account of the development of the internet. This one stands alongside Tracy Kidder's Soul of a New Machine as essential reading for people who live in the present, in a culture that is fundamentally shaped by the computer and the network. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Nathan Campos | 2/17/2013

    " A incredible and extremely detailed book about the origins of the internet. Really interesting and a great read. Recommended for all the geeks, and everyone that is interested to know more about how the service they use everyday was invented and how it works. "

  • 5 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 55 out of 5 Ben Klaasen | 2/13/2013

    " An excellent overview of the personalities and organisations who shaped the nascent Internet. An excellent read, even for the non-technical. "

  • 4 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 54 out of 5 Eric Brosch | 2/3/2013

    " The author does a fantastic job of following the development of the early Internet from inception to the development of the World Wide Web. The material is adequately technical to satisfy an engineer's curiosity, but not out of reach for a non-technical reader. "

  • 2 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 52 out of 5 Ted Moisan | 12/30/2012

    " Meh. Someone out there will love this book. It was kind of lost on me. "

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